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Computer doesn't start normally..

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
So I came home from school, ordered a new 7870XT video card, and I go to start my computer for the first time in forever, and it won't start. It will start for .5sec then shut off sometimes.


After troubleshooting I got it to start by jumping the PWR connector on the motherboard. It will still start up for .5sec sometimes before it actually starts.


So now it's down to the motherboard or case buttons....

PSU has been checked using a PSU checker.


So who is the culprit?


Case button
Case cable
Motherboard

Using a Fractal Design Arc Mini Case
ASUS M4A88TD-M/USB3 AMD 880G is the motherboard
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post #2 of 3
    Sounds like bad power (or a bad connection) to me.  Practically all PSUs and most motherboards will turn off the power supply if the voltages or ripple are significantly out of range.  Test the PSUs voltages while the computer is running (jumper start it if you have to, I wouldn't do this myself, but you already did) and make sure that the PSU's voltages are within spec during actual operation.

    I posted some pictures of a motherboard's 24-pin power connector here with pinout information.  However, don't follow the instructions on that page; you've got a different issue.  Instead, connect your meter's negative probe to a bare metal spot on your computers case, or to one of the Gnd pins coming from your PSU.
    Then, while the computer is running, measure the voltages on the 3.3v, 5v and 12v lines going into the motherboard.  This post will show you how it's done (you'll be gently poking your meter's positive probe into different pins on the back of the 24-pin ATX power connector).
    You should get 11.5v–12.5v on the 12v (yellow) wire, 4.8v–5.2v on the 5v (red) wire, and 3.1v–3.5v on the 3.3v (orange) wire.  Also, test the –12v (blue) wire and the CPU's special 12v connector.
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post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Techie007 View Post

    Sounds like bad power (or a bad connection) to me.  Practically all PSUs and most motherboards will turn off the power supply if the voltages or ripple are significantly out of range.  Test the PSUs voltages while the computer is running (jumper start it if you have to, I wouldn't do this myself, but you already did) and make sure that the PSU's voltages are within spec during actual operation.

    I posted some pictures of a motherboard's 24-pin power connector here with pinout information.  However, don't follow the instructions on that page; you've got a different issue.  Instead, connect your meter's negative probe to a bare metal spot on your computers case, or to one of the Gnd pins coming from your PSU.
    Then, while the computer is running, measure the voltages on the 3.3v, 5v and 12v lines going into the motherboard.  This post will show you how it's done (you'll be gently poking your meter's positive probe into different pins on the back of the 24-pin ATX power connector).
    You should get 11.5v–12.5v on the 12v (yellow) wire, 4.8v–5.2v on the 5v (red) wire, and 3.1v–3.5v on the 3.3v (orange) wire.  Also, test the –12v (blue) wire and the CPU's special 12v connector.

Well I already used a PSU tester thing I got awhile ago. It would've told me if any of the rails weren't within spec.

Another clue, using another case's PWR cable to connect to the mobo does the same thing. So my case is fine. It's either the PSU or the motherboard now. Pretty sure it's the mobo though. Maybe the contacts on the pins are just dirty?
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Ryzen 5 1600 Asrock B350 Fatal1ty ITX Asus GTX1060 G.Skill 8gb 3000mhz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
250gb Samsung 850 Pro SATA LG DVD Burner Windows 10 Pro X64 23" Asus 144hz 
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My System
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Ryzen 5 1600 Asrock B350 Fatal1ty ITX Asus GTX1060 G.Skill 8gb 3000mhz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
250gb Samsung 850 Pro SATA LG DVD Burner Windows 10 Pro X64 23" Asus 144hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Microsoft Ergonomic 4000 EVGA 500w Gold EVGA Hadron Air Logitech G Pro 
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