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[Info] - Intel 3570k/3770k Overclocking Tips

post #1 of 40
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Howdy all!

I have decided to do a follow up to my 2500k/2600k overclocking thread aimed at the Ivy bridge 3570k and 3770k respectively. I will be doing this guide on my Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H motherboard, I will include screenshots of my bios too!

What you'll need for overclocking the 3570k/3770k are...

CPU-Z (To monitor cpu speed/voltage) - http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html
Realtemp (To monitor cpu temperature) - http://www.techpowerup.com/downloads/SysInfo/Real_Temp/
Prime95 (To stability test the cpu) - http://www.mersenne.org/freesoft/
Piece of paper and a Pen to write down your progress and settings! Comes in handy to write down your progress and settings used so that you dont end up going 1 step forward 2 steps back!

Disclaimer: Please ensure you have the appropriate hardware in your pc before following this guide, i.e dont use a cheap stock intel cpu cooler or a cheap power supply/motherboard etc etc. This guide pushes your cpu hard and you need good quality parts in your system before overclocking the cpu! Overclocking is your responsibility, I accept no liability for any hardware damaged through the use of this overclocking guide.

No two CPUs are the same, just because CPU A can do 5ghz at 1,4v doesnt mean CPU B will do the same. Please bear this in mind when overclocking your cpu. Any changes made to your system after passing 12 hour prime95 test may mean it is no longer stable, in which case you may need to rerun the 12 hour prime 95 test.


Righto onto overclocking!

Basic concept of cpu overclocking: The cpu core speed is determined by the base clock of 100mhz and the cpu multiplier. A 4.0Ghz overclock would be base clock 100mhz x cpu multiplier of 40 to give the total 4ghz. We dont ever change the base clock speed during this guide. The main concept of overclocking a 3570k/3770k is to increase the cpu multiplier and stress test until the test fails, at which point you increase cpu multiplier then cpu voltage (cpu vcore), and repeat until you reach your target speed or thermal/voltage limit.

Differences between Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge overclocking: Many of you will remember from my old 2500k guide that I set out several settings to be changed prior to overclocking the cpu. All this has changed with Ivy Bridge overclocking and we now only need to change a couple of settings in the bios.

To be set before starting overclock

On Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H Motherboard (hopefully the names for voltage settings etc wont be too different across motherboards.)

M.I.T\Advanced Frequency Settings

CPU Clock Ratio - 40
System Memory Multiplier - 16 or change to your stock ram speed determined by 100mhz x value. I.e for 1333mhz ram type 13.33

M.I.T\Advanced Frequency Settings\Channel A Timing Settings

DRAM Timing Selectable - Quick
CAS Latency - 11 or change to your stock ram timings
tRCD - 11 or change to your stock ram timings
tRP - 11 or change to your stock ram timings
tRAS - 11 or change to your stock ram timings

M.I.T\Advanced Voltage Settings\CPU Core Voltage Control

CPU Vcore - 1.070v Stock setting

M.I.T\Advanced Voltage Settings\DRAM Voltage Control

DRAM Voltage - 1.50v or your stock RAM voltage

And thats it! These are the only settings we need to change so far. All we have done is changed the cpu multiplier to 40 to give us an overclocked speed of 4.0Ghz at stock voltage, most if not all cpus should be able to run 4ghz at stock voltage. We have also set the stock ram settings so as to ensure the ram doesnt become overclocked and interrupt getting the cpu overclock stable. Remember to put your own RAM speeds/voltages in at this point in the bios.
Overclocking to 4.0Ghz

So with these settings in the bios go ahead and click F10 to save and exit the bios. Once your pc has restarted and booted up into Windows we need CPUZ, Realtemp and Prime95 so make sure you install all three programs. Once you have done this you can go ahead and open up cpuz and ensure the 4.0ghz and 1.070v is showing up. Dont worry if it shows cpu speed 1.6, 3.4 or 3.7ghz this is normal and is the cpu underclocking itself to save power, we can disable this later. Open up Prime95 and enter the following:

Custom, Memory to use in MB - use all your ram but leave 1.5GB (1GB for windows and 500mb spare). So it should look like this:


So if I have 4GB ram total, i would use 2.5GB for this test If you have 8GB, use 6.5GB etc.

Go ahead and click OK which will start the stress test. Keep an eye on RealTemp temperatures whilst you run Prime95. You can keep this going as long as you want, I would run the test for 12 hours before I would assume my system is stable. Some people chose to run it longer which is fine. I have had prime95 fail after 6, 8, 10 hours aswell.

If you can run prime95 successfully without your pc crashing you can either go ahead and do an overnight p95 blend test if you want full stability, or increase the CPU multiplier.

Now there will be a point where you are no longer stable and either prime95 will crash, several workers will fail, your pc will BSOD or crash, for me I was able to get to 4.0ghz on stock volts with my 3770k, not bad at all considering i bought it at 3.5ghz yessir.gif

Whilst overclocking, dont forget to write down all your settings on a piece of paper or save them on a notepad document, it saves a hell of a lot of time when it comes to pinpointing your instability!

Overclocking 4.0ghz - 4.5Ghz

OK so by now you'll will have worked out your max overclock on stock volts by increasing only the CPU multiplier. Once you have found the max multiplier on stock voltages, All you do from now on is increase the cpu multiplier then up the cpu vcore until you can once again boot into windows and pass the 95 test. Keep increasing multiplier/vcore up until around the 4.5ghz mark. Obviously if you can keep going and still pass the p95 tests do that, but once you start getting BSOD's, your cpu starts locking up, or your processor becomes too hot its time to hold back because you will have found your limiting factor.

Unfortunately on normal 3570k and 3770k processors the limiting factor is often temperature due to either the poor TIM used or the glue inside the IHS increasing the gap between the cpu die and the IHS. Most people tend to find they can get up to the 4.5ghz mark with a decent aftermarket cooler which isnt too bad!

Nobody knows what safe limits are for Ivy Bridge overclocking but personally I would look to stay under 85c, so I would keep increasing cpu multiplier then cpu vcore until I saw 85c whilst stress testing. Obviously your mileage may vary!

Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H Motherboard Bios Template
Click to view (Click to show)




Common issues during overclocking

Q: Prime95 crashes during testing, X amount of workers fail during testing, I get Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD) code 0x124/0x101 while testing.

A:
X Amount of worker fails - Increase CPU vcore slightly, this is usually a sign of getting close to stability.
Prime95 crashes during testing - Attempt to increase CPU vcore, if not adjust PLL voltage.
BSOD 0x101 - Increase CPU vcore.
BSOD 0x124 - I hate this BSOD with a passion, easily the most difficult problem to overcome when overclocking Sandy Bridge CPU's due to the fact there's no easy answer. Firstly you need to establish if you have changed memory settings, PLL voltage or any power saving features. If you have changed or overclocked your memory, try putting it back to stock or underclock it whilst you stabilize your cpu. If you have changed the PLL voltage, unfortunately your gonna have to start from either the highest (1.9v) or lowest (1.5/6v) setting and work your way up or down and see if testing becomes stable. This can take a while as you should go up in single increments at a time. Lastly if you have disabled power saving features, try turning them back on or changing different combinations, i.e have C1e on but C3/C6 off.

Just to throw a spanner in the works...a 0x124 code can also be remedied by increasing cpu vcore. Sorry I cannot give a definitive answer here folks, but unfortunately this process can take some time. Stick at it and if you get problems post in this thread and we'll try get it sorted!

Q: What is the max safe temperature/CPU voltage I can run?

A: There is no definitive answer for either of these so to speak, Intel does state max cpu voltage of 1.52v,but most people don't run it that high. My recommendation is only run as high a voltage as your cpu cooler can handle. As mentioned above Ivy tends to run hot unfortunately and there will be a point where your temperatures will rocket up to and over 90c, this means you need to drop the voltage down until its at a safe point. I would try to keep under 85c personally during stress testing.

Q: Which voltage setting should I use? (offset, manual, auto)

A: NEVER use Auto! Use manual whilst stress testing, then if you wish switch to offset to save power and reduce heat. If your going to be folding with this cpu, you might aswell use manual voltage seen as how its never going to sit at idle.

Q: How do I use Offset voltage on my CPU?


A: Offset voltage is very simple. It uses your CPU VID amount and then depending on whether you set +0.XXX or -0.XXX it will either add or subtract this amount to give you your final cpu voltage. For instance my VID is 1.365 and I want my cpu to run at 1.400v, I would set offset to +0.035, giving me total of 1.400. Don't forget you still need to account for vdroop with offset, so depending on your LLC level you might need higher or lower amounts of offset to get your desired voltage. Example, Say my VID is 1.365, I want 1.40v so I set offset +0.035, however I get into windows and under full load im only getting 1.392v. I would then set offset to +0.040v. You may need to experiment with this a couple times in Windows, but remember check voltage when cpu is at full load, as this is the important amount of voltage to provide.

To find out your CPU's VID all you need to do is open up Realtemp v3.67 and click on the box in the top right corner, it will either be displaying 00:00:01 (amount of time its been running), 100W (CPU Power draw) or will say 1.365 VID.

Q: How does LLC work and which level/setting should I use?

A: Load Line Calibration adjusts the amount of cpu vdroop in windows, vdroop is the perfectly normal process wherein a certain amount of voltage is 'dropped' from the cpu in windows to protect it from damage caused by voltage spikes. VDROP - Basically in bios you might set cpu vcore to 1.400v, but in windows you might see 1.36v. You have a voltage drop of 0.04v. VDROOP - The difference in voltage in CPUz from load to idle. LLC can help to reduce the amount of vdroop in windows. With LLC the aim of the game is to get the cpu voltage in windows as close as possible to what you set in bios when the cpu is under full load. You will need to test each LLC level to determine which best helps you get as little voltage drop as possible. Fluctuations are normal when using LLC, and you can expect the voltage to jump by several increments at full load.

Hope this helps folks! All suggestions welcome! thumb.gif
Edited by $ilent - 5/21/13 at 11:09am
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post #2 of 40
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bump smile.gif
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post #3 of 40
Thread Starter 
Anyone still overclocking ivy these days? tongue.gif
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post #4 of 40
Hey $ilent
First thank you for the nice tutorial, I just bought my new Computer with a 3770k CPU and a Z77X UD3H Mainboard from Gigabyte so the tutorial is perfect for me..
Now I have one question because you may have experiences with that:

Do you think that a "be quiet! Dark Rock Advanced C1" is good enough for a 4,5GHZ overclock of the 3770k?

greetings, nitex
post #5 of 40
Thread Starter 
Hi NiTEX96, thanks for your post!

With regards to that cpu cooler I think it more depends on what voltage your 3770k needs for that 4.5ghz overclock. Generally there is a point on ivy voltage where the temps shoot up and the cpu cooler doesnt really make a difference. I would hazard a guess and say you should be ok so long as you dont need upwards of 1.3v to do it.
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post #6 of 40
Great job $ilent! Nice to see more and more guides here on OCN thumb.gif

+rep

EDIT:

If it is, and I'm sure it will be, as popular as the Sandy Bridge guide, I will link it in the Intel CPU Essentials Collected Guides as I have done with your previous guide.
Edited by munaim1 - 5/20/13 at 4:55pm
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i5 2500K [5ghz 1.44v 24/7] Asus Maximus IV Extreme SLI GTX 460 @ 920/1840/4100 [1.11v] 4GB Dominator GT @ 2133mhz CL8 [1.65v] 
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Sandy Transformed
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 2500K [5ghz 1.44v 24/7] Asus Maximus IV Extreme SLI GTX 460 @ 920/1840/4100 [1.11v] 4GB Dominator GT @ 2133mhz CL8 [1.65v] 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingOS
Intel X25-M G2 80GB 3x Samsung F3 500GB RAID 0 EK Supreme HF Full Copper Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit 
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LG42SL9500 42" 1080p [Surround Soon] XFX XXX Edition 650w Xigmatec Elysium JVC HA-RX700 [foam mod] 
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post #7 of 40
Do you guys find that upping BCLK say to 103 stabilizes the OC?
post #8 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by munaim1 View Post

Great job $ilent! Nice to see more and more guides here on OCN thumb.gif

+rep

EDIT:

If it is, and I'm sure it will be, as popular as the Sandy Bridge guide, I will link it in the Intel CPU Essentials Collected Guides as I have done with your previous guide.

Thanks Munaim biggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by SynchronicBoost View Post

Do you guys find that upping BCLK say to 103 stabilizes the OC?

No, if anything I would have thought doing that would put more stress on the OC.
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post #9 of 40
Hey, Thanks for the guide. Should be helpful when I am trying to push my CPU a bit more. Currently have it stable at 4.2 (not sure of voltage) but would like to get it about 4.5
post #10 of 40
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thanks! smile.gif
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