Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Windows › Interesting read on windows 8.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Interesting read on windows 8.

Poll Results: Do you find this accurate?

 
  • 25% (1)
    True?
  • 75% (3)
    Exaggerated?
  • 0% (0)
    Completely without merit?
4 Total Votes  
post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 
I found this comment on a yahoo article I was reading the other night. I cannot seem to find the article anymore but this was in the comments section. It's virtually an editorial and all makes sense quite well. Not posting for trollbait but am curious as to your thoughts. It was very well written and explains a great deal about windows 8 and the reasoning behind it. I wish I could find the article to properly credit this to the commenter.
Quote:
For every would-be Windows 8 user who asks himself, upon seeing Windows 8, “What hell was Microsoft thinking when they came up with Windows 8?”, the answer can be traced back to $$$. It goes something like this:
1. Microsoft was caught off-guard by Apple and Google with not only their mobile devices, but the app-store. Microsoft decided that it wanted some of this revenue.

2. Less Well Known – as with any large, mature company, Microsoft is suffering from “corporate bed sores”. You business types should understand what I mean by this: A company eventually starts to grow warts in the competency of its ranks. Those warts latch on to the organization and work it like a cancer. Rather than fire the the leeches regular (as Cisco reportedly did in the 1990′s), they are retained. The result is inability for true innovation.

3. Steve Ballmer is no Bill Gates. Like Steve Jobs said, his mentality is more like that of a used-car salesman. He would rather make a buck by gimmicky deception, because he is inherently less predisposed to doing so with real innovation. There are numerous people at the executive level at Microsoft who share this disposition. They are easy to find – they are the ones who ran off the world-class talent over the past decade from Microsoft.

4. There are some people who genuinely believe that the Fisher-Price interface is good for everyone. A kinder, gentler anti-elitist, digital experience is what they seek. Julie-Larson Green appears to be one of these people. Let us call these people, collectively, the Hegelian-Horde.
This strange combination of characters, Hegelian-Horded, mixed with rapaciously-minded executives, leads to Windows 8 – a dumbed-down Mickey Mouse user-interface that has the purpose of milking the good will of Windows users to no end.

Microsoft could have created a tablet, and stopped there, and fought with honor with Google and Apple, but Ballmer/etc. got greedy. Concerned that they had already missed the market, they decided that they would force acclimation with their tablet interface by forcing everyone on the desktop to use the same interface. Yes, some of them are aware that physically touching a desktop monitor every day with greasy fingers would not fly, but they figured that if they could “just get some momentum”, the sheep would eat it.
Let’s look at those tablets. Let’s talk about Metro in particular.

Microsoft currently has a monopoly on the OS for desktop PC’s. If I buy an OS, either directly, for via my PC OEM, I pay Microsoft a one-time fee. That is the end of my relationship with Microsoft, until I decide to buy, oh..say, an XBOX. Microsoft decided that it was time to start milking the good-will that the Windows OS has created over the past 20+ years. They would do this by moving to a “recurring revenue” model.
First, as hinted in this article, they would start charging for annual updates, to Enterprise as well as consumers. This does several things:

1. Gives them a reason to charge you more than $100 for what is essentially the same product, with some tweaks.

2. Get you psychologically congruent to the idea that that Microsoft will be in your wallet every month.

3. Creates customer “stickiness”, as everyone knows, once a company starts billing you for someone, whatever it is, it is a lot harder to leave that company.

4. Greases the financial processing pipe against your wallet for other services.

This is why Windows 8 is constantly asking you to sign-up for a Microsoft Account, over and over, when you install Windows 8, to the point of harassment. They want very badly to establish and account for billing from the beginning. This is also probably the reason that the Windows 8.1 update will only be available via Microsoft App Store – they will probably make you get a Microsoft Account, just to be able to get the update [Which is ironic, because if you are trying to download the update, you are trying to get away from these gimmicks.]

Once you have a Microsoft account, they will start charging you monthly fee for all kinds of things, even XBOX. No one needs to be told that the consumer’s payout to Microsoft will be far-greater than had the relationship been a one-off.

To migrate the sheep toward Metro, Microsoft would do gimmicks like

1. Eliminate the ability to play DVD’s, but offer video/music services.

2. Eliminate POP3 support, but bring it back as a service in the form of Outlook.com.

3. Give you “Live Tiles”, but push advertisements through them.

4. Re-offer games that were previously free in the form of vehicles for advertisement (Solitaire, etc.)

And now comes the biggest coup of them all: $25-$40 billion extra/ year in revenue for Microsoft:
Institute a 20-30% tax on all Windows applications sold.

First, to avoid having to have a sit-down with Department of Justice by trying to tax desktop applications, they would create an entirely knew programmer’s API that is different from the desktop API – Metro.
Next, they would launch a massive campaign to try to convince developers that this API is technological superior to the old API (it’snot – it’s horrifically poorly engineered).

Then, they would declare that any Metro app sold must be sold through their App Store.
The would inflate the number of Apps that they have available, even paying some “low-cost” developers to write “filler” apps to pad the store.
They would force all users to boot to Metro, whether they wanted it or not.

They would slowly do things to cripple desktop applications, and also start a psychological campaign to get developers to abandon it, using, for example, the world “legacy” against desktop API’s that are only a couple of years old.

They would cripple the programming language (C++) that professional third-party developers use to write portable applications so that the applications will only run in a Metro-like environment. [This effort got shut-down in its tracks by international standards bodies].

To mitigate the apprehension of OEM’s who, by their own instincts, where worried that the sheep would not eat the new grain, Microsoft told them to jack up the prices of their wares, since this was a new product, and they had a reason to make the prices high. The OEM’s, especially Dell (poor Dell), wanted so badly to go back to the glory days of fatter margins, they actually bought into it. Imagine the feeling that a sales group gets when they realize that, not only the the fat-margin-gravy-train return, but the product made things WORSE than they were before it arrived. That’s what Dell is dealing with right now.
So this is the plan. This is why, right now, Microsoft is trying exceedingly hard to figure out a way to make it appear that the START menu has come back, without actually bringing it back. They are hell-bent on getting everyone onto Metro, whether we like it or not. See this video of Steve Ballmer’s exuberance for Metro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CM1W_qFLZM.

Now I know what some of you business-types are thinking: You’re think, “Heck, if Microsoft can pull off fleecing their sheep in such a way that they get $25-$40 billion (mostly profit) / year extra, I’m all for that! That’s good business.”

I have some bad news for you. Things are not going to work out that way. Windows 8 has already failed, but that is not the real issue, since many of us knew 18 months ago that Windows 8 would fail.

The real issue is that, in pulling this stunt, Microsoft has offended the collective sensibilities of 10s’ of millions of their own customers. This is not a Vista situation, where the problem was bugs and a bit of sloppiness. This time is different. There is a bond, based on some modicum of trust, between producer and consumer in a market. Microsoft broke that bond. They revealed their character.

True, not everyone understands Microsoft’s motivation for Windows 8. Some people think that Microsoft simply has poor taste in UI design, and cannot link what they are doing with the $$$ that Microsoft hopes to get. But most people do feel that their wishes are not being honored. These people are furious, not at the OS, but at Microsoft itself. They are looking at Apple and Google even MORE than they did before Windows 8 came out.

Windows 8, without qualification, is THE most destructive strategic move that Microsoft has made in its entire existence.

Please do not start a flame war, just curious as to various opinions on this piece. Do you think it's true? Exaggerated? Completely without merit?
Edited by Tadaen Sylvermane - 5/20/13 at 11:40am
 
Micromachine
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 4500u Inspiron 15 7000 Integrated 8gb 
Hard DriveOSMouse
120gb Samsung EVO SSD Debian Logitech m705 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
AMD 5350 Kabini AsRock AM1H-ITX 8gb Gskill Ripjaws (2x4) Samsung 120 Evo 
Hard DriveHard DriveOSCase
WD 1tb 2.5 WD 2tb USB 3.0 Ubuntu Server 16.04 Antec ISK 
  hide details  
Reply
 
Micromachine
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 4500u Inspiron 15 7000 Integrated 8gb 
Hard DriveOSMouse
120gb Samsung EVO SSD Debian Logitech m705 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
AMD 5350 Kabini AsRock AM1H-ITX 8gb Gskill Ripjaws (2x4) Samsung 120 Evo 
Hard DriveHard DriveOSCase
WD 1tb 2.5 WD 2tb USB 3.0 Ubuntu Server 16.04 Antec ISK 
  hide details  
Reply
post #2 of 2

It certainly feels true to me. Naturally, time will tell, but for now I think that the author of this comment is probably dead on.

It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
It's a computer!
(19 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5-2500K @ 4.5GHz (1.368-1.384V fixed voltage) ASUS P8P67 EVO B3 (UEFI ver. 1850) GTX 780 ASUS DirectCU II (1228 / 6300, 1.180V) G.SKILL Ripjaws X 8GB (2 x 4GB) 1866MHz, CL9 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (C:\) 250 GB Samsung 840 EVO (D:\) 150 GB WD VelociRaptor Samsung SH-S243N 24x DVD Burner 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Samsung SH-S203N 20X DVD Burner Thermaltake Frio Win 7 Home Premium x64 SP1 Retail AOC G2460PG (24" 1920 x 1080 144Hz G-SYNC) 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Filco Majestouch 104-key Cherry MX Blues w/NKRO Corsair HX650 (Bronze, ordered on 12-12-2009) CM 690 Intellimouse Optical (1.1A) 1000Hz polling rate 
Mouse PadAudioAudio
Basic, but premium round X-Fi Titanium HD Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 (with 16 AWG Monster Cable... 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Windows
Overclock.net › Forums › Software, Programming and Coding › Operating Systems › Windows › Interesting read on windows 8.