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post #81 of 111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Im Batman View Post

Seems to be the correct method as specified by acrylic manufacturers. Check out the Finishing Guide PDF. Perhaps try the coarser grit and then the finer grit over the same area as they specify.

"All methods of sanding will result in the removal of machining marks, and produce a matte finish. The choice of hand, palm, random orbit, disc, belt, or drum sanding, depends on the quantity, size and shape of the acrylic sheet. Like sanding wood, work from coarse to fine paper. Use light pressure, and keep the part or sander moving to avoid heat build up (See Fig. 11). After sanding, the edge is ready for buffing or flame polishing."

http://www.plaskolite.com/Fabrication/Acrylic/Finishing

Should I use 'wet or dry' sandpaper? Because I see alot of modders use this type of sandpaper, but I don't know why. Sometimes they use water and soap to sand something down, sometimes they don't, what's the difference between these two methods?
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post #82 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liradon View Post

Should I use 'wet or dry' sandpaper? Because I see alot of modders use this type of sandpaper, but I don't know why. Sometimes they use water and soap to sand something down, sometimes they don't, what's the difference between these two methods?


The idea is that 'wet-sand paper' will reduce the amount of filings (dust) clogging up between the grit of the sand paper therefore the sand paper will be usable for longer etc, also it can be particularly useful when your about to apply your final coat so that dust wont get into the air and settle on your finish. I can only reference this to houses but I imaging it would be applicable to your case when you do your final paint job if you happen to sand immediately prior and given you do so within a relatively confined space.

Reasons it might not be 'wet' is because whatever you might be sanding might be affected by the water e.g. plaster filler and/or sand 'papers' that bond the grit to the paper with glue don't work when wet. Water degrades the paper quickly, and it will also debond the girt. You end up with a layer of grit on the surface you are sanding.

So yeah if your going to use wet sand paper you need to get one that wont degrade in water.
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post #83 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Im Batman View Post

The idea is that 'wet-sand paper' will reduce the amount of filings (dust) clogging up between the grit of the sand paper therefore the sand paper will be usable for longer etc, also it can be particularly useful when your about to apply your final coat so that dust wont get into the air and settle on your finish. I can only reference this to houses but I imaging it would be applicable to your case when you do your final paint job if you happen to sand immediately prior and given you do so within a relatively confined space.

Reasons it might not be 'wet' is because whatever you might be sanding might be affected by the water e.g. plaster filler and/or sand 'papers' that bond the grit to the paper with glue don't work when wet. Water degrades the paper quickly, and it will also debond the girt. You end up with a layer of grit on the surface you are sanding.

So yeah if your going to use wet sand paper you need to get one that wont degrade in water.

Right now, I don't see any advantages of wet sanding as I'm going to do all the dirty work outside.
Is wet-dry sandpaper more expensive as normal sandpaper?
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post #84 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liradon View Post

Right now, I don't see any advantages of wet sanding as I'm going to do all the dirty work outside.
Is wet-dry sandpaper more expensive as normal sandpaper?

No idea but you would have to imagine that it would be.
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post #85 of 111
Thread Starter 
Normal sandpaper it is smile.gif
We'll see how that works out. Probably going to buy from 100 up to 2000, to test this matte acrylic method wink.gif
Thanks for the guide btw Im Batman!
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post #86 of 111
I usually use 220 grit standard sandpaper on a wood block for frosting acrylic. Light pressure and move in small circles, random pattern. Keep going until you can't see any more glossy surface. It takes a little while with 220. I wouldn't recommend anything like 1000 grit, or really anything above 400. Wet sanding not necessary.
post #87 of 111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TLHarrell View Post

I usually use 220 grit standard sandpaper on a wood block for frosting acrylic. Light pressure and move in small circles, random pattern. Keep going until you can't see any more glossy surface. It takes a little while with 220. I wouldn't recommend anything like 1000 grit, or really anything above 400. Wet sanding not necessary.

But I did something similar with 240 grit, and it was still too rough for what I want.
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post #88 of 111
Yes, but you're going in a straight line pattern with too much pressure. Use a block to even out the pressure on your piece, and stick to small ~2" circle sanding motion. Switch it up to 400 grit if you're still being too heavy handed. But it'll take a lot longer to get to the point where you've hit everything with the paper.

Occasionally, I'll blast everything with the hand orbital sander first just to get it down flat, then work it by hand to get the orbital marks out. Smaller pieces it's just faster to do the whole part by hand.
post #89 of 111
Thread Starter 
Just tried it with a hand sander and 120 grit paper, but it only grinds away the edges. The middle of the sandpaper is almost intact and seems unused. Even though I apply little force and use circular motions. Maybe 400 grit will do, but I can't try that right now
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post #90 of 111

Nice ideas you have going on here.thumb.gif I love the cell window in particular. I would personally not do the goggles unless you can add more of the helmet with them somehow, they just look a little out of place Imo.

You could use one of these, if you had a air compressor. I would use crushed walnut shells ad the blasting media and lay the acrylic flat on a flat surface, such as plywood. You would have to make just a few really quick passes at a time from about 12"-18" away so you wouldn't over heat or warp the panel. I would recommend testing on a  scrap piece first. If I still had mine I would test this out. I might pick one up when I ever decide to start my project.

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