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Offset OC HELP!

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
3770K CPU

I am trying to understand offset voltage overclock. Currently I have a stable manual voltage OC of 4.7ghz @ 1.260v.

However I have tried so many different ways to get an offset OC working it's starting to get really frustrating. Basically I first set my multiplier to 47x, set voltage mode to offset and left it on auto and changed LLC to 75% on Sabertooth Z77. What I was expecting to see with the auto setting was a lower voltage at idle than under load. However what I ended up seeing was the voltage significantly lowering when running P95 than when idling.

E.g.

idle Volt: 1.384v
P95 Volt: 1.304v

Anyway I am fully aware this isn't how you are meant to do offset overclocking, I just wanted to test with auto settings. So anyway from what I've gathered in guides I need to find out my processors stock voltage for the given multiplier.

So for me at 47x the stock voltage was 1.180v. I can boot into windows and browse with this voltage but p95 causes BSOD, so I assume this is the voltage my CPU can run at when idling.

Then, from what I've gathered, you are meant to take your manual OC voltage under load, which in my case was 1.275v.

Then you are meant to take your load voltage away from the stock voltage leaving you with the offset value.

so for me 1.275v - 1.180v = 0.095v

So I entered my BIOS and put a positive 0.095v offset in. Booted up and it worked fine however the voltage reading in CPU-Z was showing slightly higher (at idle) than it was before on manual setting (at idle).

I thought the point of this offset voltage thing was to reduce idle voltage but allow the voltage to increase to the needed voltage when the CPU calls for it.

Basically I was expecting to see with my +0.095v offset OC:

idle voltage = 1.180v and increasing up to 1.275v as CPU usage increases...

1.
I really want to understand where I'm going wrong and how to achieve offset OC :-(

2.
I want to understand why auto offset actually reduces voltage under load??
post #2 of 28
Thread Starter 
no takers?
post #3 of 28
Yes I can help you. It is a bit different from board to board but the idea is generally the same process. What you need to understand about offset is this. You don't want to use auto, just like to forced manual voltage you need to turn LLC to standard or low , i'm not sure how it's labeled in your motherboard. Also that voltage for 4.7 seems skeptical. That might be really good for 4.5 but i doubt its stable for long periods of time, but i'm not one to judge if that is your voltage for 4.7 you have one hell of a chip. For 4.5 i need 1.28 to about actually 1.3 to be stable properly. Once you have offset mode enabled turn LLC off or to standard mode. You then need to think of offset as addition or subtraction.For example if you know 4.7 is stable with 1.30. You at normal might get a voltage on normal with no llc of maybee 1.28. You can then add positive values like 0.010 and see where this brings your voltage. Or in your case if you know it does 1.27 subtract 0.005 or some small number. What I can tell you is be careful to not go too low because both your power settings idle and load are both affected by offset values. What you also want to know is if you're using offset make sure power saving is enabled to even take advantage of it.
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post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 
Is it worth it?
post #5 of 28

You don't want to take the load voltage away from the stock voltage, you want to take the VID away from the load voltage.  So you need to know two things - your desired load voltage (1.260V) and your VID at load (which you can get from Realtemp).  Then take the load voltage minus the VID (1.26 - 1.20 (for example) = 0.06V).  That's your offset. 

 

You also need to enable C1E and EIST in the BIOS - the fact that your voltage is so high at idle makes me think you have C1E disabled.

 

And the reason the voltage is dropping so much at load is Vdroop, which happens when there is a large current draw under heavy load.  You can couteract that with Loadline Calibration (LLC) - normally set something in the middle of the available range - for the Sabertooth I would set High and see how that does.


Edited by Forceman - 5/21/13 at 12:31pm
post #6 of 28
Yes but he also have auto voltage enabled. I know on my motherboard offset doesn't quite work the way you explained. Same idea different process. I have choices of LLC and I set mine to standard i don't want massive LLC because my voltage raises each LLC level. For my offset voltage for cpu is set to normal. I choose offset value , for instance cpu set 1.25 on normal with LLC to standard., but I know my chip can only be stable at 1.3 for my 2500k @ 4.5 ghz so i need a positive offset voltage. I add about .0010, and my voltage is about 1.3. You have to play with the values a bit I don't know the exact formula its not as simple as just adding or subtracting 10 digit numbers because if you think .010 would add .10 volts. might make that 1.35 but it doesn't. And i do know that from learning and even forums in here. i know on my board if i choose 0.010 i have to take in account the idle voltage as well because it will add or subtract 0.010 just like it does at load. So if I went to low I might get bsod on idle but not load, because on idle it might dip to low and be unstable.
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post #7 of 28
Yes offset is worth it for both temps and not having your cpu 24/7 overclocked. More of a green overclocking approach. I love offset voltage.
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post #8 of 28

He said he tested it with Auto to see how it worked, and then used a +0.095V offset.  So he wasn't using Auto the whole time, at least not the way I read his post.

 

You are correct that the initial offset usually isn't quite right, because of LLC and motherboard variations, and you'll need to fine-tune it to get it just right.  I should have mentioned that, but I was more focused on the idle voltage part of his problem.

post #9 of 28
O ok agreed i misread part of it and 0.095 + is a nightmare that is where his problem lies, dude you don't want to go over + or - 0.030 in my experience. Play with LLC and find your balance , just like with voltage manual setting would you set a voltage of 3.0, that is nuts. 0.095 is way too high plus or minus. Back that way down, and lower LLC and enable power settings. Remember idle and load are affected by your choiced plus or minus. The whole plus or minus thing is up to you, before you even play with off set you need to know where your cpu is stable at. This is so you know how much to add or subtract when you set off set mode Voltage I know on my board is not set to auto It is set to normal mode then offset mode is unlocked. I choose a small LLC level, most will tell you to turn it off. Then you can play with values by subtracting or adding values to get to or around the voltage you know its stable at.
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post #10 of 28
Thread Starter 
You don't want to take the load voltage away from the stock voltage, you want to take the VID away from the load voltage. So you need to know two things - your desired load voltage (1.260V) and your VID at load (which you can get from Realtemp). Then take the load voltage minus the VID (1.26 - 1.20 (for example) = 0.06V). That's your offset.


Regarding this, I found my VID (RealTemp) under load did not increase when running P95 @ 1.260v manual. Am I getting the correct VID? Do I need to go auto offset and read the VID then?
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