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post #31 of 96
Always be sure to check the main ( news feed ) archlinux page tongue.gif

https://www.archlinux.org/

If manual intervention is required it will be posted there first.
post #32 of 96
oh goody. More breaking changes to look forward to wth.gif
post #33 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

oh goody. More breaking changes to look forward to wth.gif

The glibc/filesystem incident last year wasn't THAT bad... it only had half the community breaking their installs and a riot on the forums...

Who would ever think another filesystem change would go wrong rolleyes.gif
post #34 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

The glibc/filesystem incident last year wasn't THAT bad... it only had half the community breaking their installs and a riot on the forums...

Who would ever think another filesystem change would go wrong rolleyes.gif

it's getting to the point that I dread every -Suy (which wouldn't be so bad if there wasn't so many bloody updates every week).

Honestly, if it wasn't for AUR, then I don't think I'd use Arch on any of my PCs again.
post #35 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

it's getting to the point that I dread every -Suy (which wouldn't be so bad if there wasn't so many bloody updates every week).

Honestly, if it wasn't for AUR, then I don't think I'd use Arch on any of my PCs again.

Between that and the whole attitude over their this past year or so now, I really don't see a reason to use Arch other than the AUR as well. Mainly why I've not gotten around to reinstalling it on my new rig lately... just wanted something that works for the time being until I can find time to really get back into another distribution comfortably. Right now I'm just thinking about going with either plain old Debian or Fedora / Cent ( or other RPM based ). I can't really be bothered with Gentoo or Slack these days either.

I think I've gotten to the point where I just want the computer to work with as little effort as possible, and not have to manage yet another computer when I get home. It would be nice to have an AUR or ABS for other distributions, but meh, if I absolutely need to I can just patch and/or compile myself. Or write up a .deb or .rpm to save for later use.

I do like having FreeBSD and OpenBSD on my system, but then it comes back to not feeling like doing all that just for a simple personal desktop...

Not like I use my desktop for much other than writing simple scripts, browsing the web, media type stuff and games. I do all my work related stuff on my laptop.
Edited by Shrak - 6/3/13 at 3:35pm
post #36 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Between that and the whole attitude over their this past year or so now, I really don't see a reason to use Arch other than the AUR as well. Mainly why I've not gotten around to reinstalling it on my new rig lately... just wanted something that works for the time being until I can find time to really get back into another distribution comfortably. Right now I'm just thinking about going with either plain old Debian or Fedora / Cent ( or other RPM based ). I can't really be bothered with Gentoo or Slack these days either.

I think I've gotten to the point where I just want the computer to work with as little effort as possible, and not have to manage yet another computer when I get home. It would be nice to have an AUR or ABS for other distributions, but meh, if I absolutely need to I can just patch and/or compile myself. Or write up a .deb or .rpm to save for later use.

I do like having FreeBSD and OpenBSD on my system, but then it comes back to not feeling like doing all that just for a simple personal desktop...

Not like I use my desktop for much other than writing simple scripts, browsing the web, media type stuff and games. I do all my work related stuff on my laptop.

I'm 100% the same. Been there, done Slackware. Now I just want a binary distribution for ease but with some community managed source based extension for those extra things. I load so much from AUR but I'm already decided my home server is going to be fully FreeBSD come my next upgrade and seriously considering Debian Unstable for my laptop. (I just wish I liked apt-get frown.gif )
post #37 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

I'm 100% the same. Been there, done Slackware. Now I just want a binary distribution for ease but with some community managed source based extension for those extra things. I load so much from AUR but I'm already decided my home server is going to be fully FreeBSD come my next upgrade and seriously considering Debian Unstable for my laptop. (I just wish I liked apt-get frown.gif )

Yeah, apt-get/dpkg really do annoy me. I really do love pacman for it's simplicity while still maintaining so much power. That's really been my only put off from going Debian and why I was considering an RPM base as I do like the tools better than Debian, but they still aren't quite like Pacman.

And my god is it really so hard to make a clean human readable output for package managers? Another reason I love Pacman, absolutely the easiest output to read, proper indentations, line breaks and symbols...

Apt-get is just a wall'o'text and #'s, lol.
post #38 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Yeah, apt-get/dpkg really do annoy me. I really do love pacman for it's simplicity while still maintaining so much power. That's really been my only put off from going Debian and why I was considering an RPM base as I do like the tools better than Debian, but they still aren't quite like Pacman.

And my god is it really so hard to make a clean human readable output for package managers? Another reason I love Pacman, absolutely the easiest output to read, proper indentations, line breaks and symbols...

Apt-get is just a wall'o'text and #'s, lol.

Totally - though I really don't like RPMs at all, but I do agree that some RPM distros have nicer package tools than Debian (yum is quite nice from what I recall).

The main thing I hate about apt-get is how crappy it's search is (or rather, apt-caches). Half the time I'm having to grep the results, and the other half the time I end up googling for the answers. Considering how evangelical Debian users are over apt, it does amaze me at just how crappy it is.
post #39 of 96
I'm liking FreeBSDs new pkg tool, I'm just waiting for the PC-BSD repository to stabalise. FreeBSD as a desktop takes a bit of configuration (same as Arch imo) but once you have it configured it will stay that way.
post #40 of 96
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

it's getting to the point that I dread every -Suy (which wouldn't be so bad if there wasn't so many bloody updates every week).

Honestly, if it wasn't for AUR, then I don't think I'd use Arch on any of my PCs again.

If you use the machine on nearly a daily basis and run -Suy then, there shouldn't be too many problems unless the binaries are moved or other manual intervention.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Yeah, apt-get/dpkg really do annoy me. I really do love pacman for it's simplicity while still maintaining so much power. That's really been my only put off from going Debian and why I was considering an RPM base as I do like the tools better than Debian, but they still aren't quite like Pacman.

And my god is it really so hard to make a clean human readable output for package managers? Another reason I love Pacman, absolutely the easiest output to read, proper indentations, line breaks and symbols...

Apt-get is just a wall'o'text and #'s, lol.
In the short time that I have used pacman I have quite liked it, and only gotten a glimpse of how powerful.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Between that and the whole attitude over their this past year or so now, I really don't see a reason to use Arch other than the AUR as well. Mainly why I've not gotten around to reinstalling it on my new rig lately... just wanted something that works for the time being until I can find time to really get back into another distribution comfortably. Right now I'm just thinking about going with either plain old Debian or Fedora / Cent ( or other RPM based ). I can't really be bothered with Gentoo or Slack these days either.

I think I've gotten to the point where I just want the computer to work with as little effort as possible, and not have to manage yet another computer when I get home. It would be nice to have an AUR or ABS for other distributions, but meh, if I absolutely need to I can just patch and/or compile myself. Or write up a .deb or .rpm to save for later use.

I do like having FreeBSD and OpenBSD on my system, but then it comes back to not feeling like doing all that just for a simple personal desktop...

Not like I use my desktop for much other than writing simple scripts, browsing the web, media type stuff and games. I do all my work related stuff on my laptop.

While I do want to get a lot of experience with Arch, I would like for things to not break down if I personally didn't break it (and even then I don't want it to break smile.gif )

Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

Totally - though I really don't like RPMs at all, but I do agree that some RPM distros have nicer package tools than Debian (yum is quite nice from what I recall).

The main thing I hate about apt-get is how crappy it's search is (or rather, apt-caches). Half the time I'm having to grep the results, and the other half the time I end up googling for the answers. Considering how evangelical Debian users are over apt, it does amaze me at just how crappy it is.
euhh...apt-get those were the ubuntu days, nice that they are behind, for now.
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PAIN
(11 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 3930K P9X79 PRO GIGABYTE G1 Gaming GeForce GTX 970 Samsung  
RAMHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung  Crucial M4 64GB SSD Seagate Barracuda 1TB ASUS 24x DVD Burner 
CoolingOSOSMonitor
NH-D14 Windows 7 Ultamite 64 bit Arch Linux ASUS VW246H Glossy Black 24" HDMI Widescreen LC... 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech Combo mk520 Seasonic X Series 650W NXT Phantom 410 Logitech Combo mk520 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 2600K P8Z68-V PRO GEN3 NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti  Samsung  
RAMHard DriveHard DriveCooling
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