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Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra Thermal Paste question

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Hi everybody,

I am just about to build my first custom water loop on my gaming rig and I've been debating whether to try out Coollabs Liquid Ultra Thermal Paste as I've read some great things about it: This stuff

So I was just wondering if anyone has used this before and could offer any info about it. Such as is it true that you can remove and reseat your heatsink without having to reapply the paste as it doesn't set or cure???

I would be using for between the CPU IHS and Water Block (XSPC RayStorm Copper) not for de-lidding.

Thanks guys, appreciate any info or advise.
Cheers
post #2 of 17
I myself have not used it but anywhere I have seen people talking about this rather them
using it on a Video card are under the IHS of a 3770K it has been noting but great for them
so really I would go for it and try it!!!


-ROG
post #3 of 17
Its probably not worth the hassle for between the IHS and waterblock imo. Normal thermal paste will perform similarly and be much easier to clean up as well as being much cheaper.
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My System
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 3570k Gigabyte Z77X-UD5H MSI TF3 7950 Tri-fire Samsung 30nm 4x4GB 
Hard DriveOSMonitorKeyboard
Intel 320 160GB and a few samsung platters Windows7 x64 Catleap Q270 Rosewill mechanical 
PowerCaseMouseMouse Pad
Corsair AX850 Xigmatek Elysium Razer Deathadder Puretrak talent 
Audio
Xonar Essence STX 
  hide details  
Reply
post #4 of 17
My macbook pro was severely throttling due to overheating.
After being sick and tired of my poor little C2D hitting 100 degrees (and GPU 110) when stressing with both fans maxed out I decided to tear the poor little bugger apart and replace the old stock paste with liquid ultra. The CPU temps have never gone above 70 degrees since, and the GPU can be held below throttling levels without the fans on 4000rpm instead of 6000.

Amazing stuff if you ask me.

However if you use it between the IHS and waterblock you'll void your CPU's warranty (since removing the liquid ultra will also remove the lettering)
So you might want to reconsider it, since normal thermal paste (when properly applied) still does very well.
post #5 of 17
I use CLU between my IHS and die on 3770k and on the cores of both of my 7950. IMO it's not worth the hassle of getting it off (IF you don't touch your water block that often). If you do fidget with your stuff then I say go for it, but before you jump head first there are a couple things you should know.

The scientific name for this stuff is called Gallium. Do yourself a favor before you mess around with the stuff and look up a video about it. This stuff literally MELTS aluminum. Don't let that scare you though. You will be fine putting it on copper or nickel. Another warning. This stuff is conductive!! Be very careful and take your time. Lastly, I'm not sure what the person above me is talking about, but I'm pretty sure he used the scruff pad that came with his CLU. DON'T use the scruff pad. It is not necessary and will just make you unknowingly lap you IHS a little bit. To take it off you should get some paper towels wet with isopropyl alcohol. Just fold them up so it makes a thick layer and put them against the top of the alcohol bottle and flip it upside quickly. Now this part is important. We are pretty much dealing with dried metal. Dried metal will scratch. So what you want to do is dab the entire area that you are trying to get the CLU off. DON'T rub. Dab. You will see black on the paper towel. Now use a clean are of the paper towel to repeat it. Do this a couple more times and then with another section of the paper towel covered with isopropyl alcohol you can now start rubbing it off and it should come off fine if you take your time. Hope this helped!
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RavageTheEarth View Post

I use CLU between my IHS and die on 3770k and on the cores of both of my 7950. IMO it's not worth the hassle of getting it off (IF you don't touch your water block that often). If you do fidget with your stuff then I say go for it, but before you jump head first there are a couple things you should know.

The scientific name for this stuff is called Gallium. Do yourself a favor before you mess around with the stuff and look up a video about it. This stuff literally MELTS aluminum. Don't let that scare you though. You will be fine putting it on copper or nickel. Another warning. This stuff is conductive!! Be very careful and take your time. Lastly, I'm not sure what the person above me is talking about, but I'm pretty sure he used the scruff pad that came with his CLU. DON'T use the scruff pad. It is not necessary and will just make you unknowingly lap you IHS a little bit. To take it off you should get some paper towels wet with isopropyl alcohol. Just fold them up so it makes a thick layer and put them against the top of the alcohol bottle and flip it upside quickly. Now this part is important. We are pretty much dealing with dried metal. Dried metal will scratch. So what you want to do is dab the entire area that you are trying to get the CLU off. DON'T rub. Dab. You will see black on the paper towel. Now use a clean are of the paper towel to repeat it. Do this a couple more times and then with another section of the paper towel covered with isopropyl alcohol you can now start rubbing it off and it should come off fine if you take your time. Hope this helped!

RavageTheEarth you are a star, thank you thumb.gif

I had seen some pics of this stuff being applied to alloy stun.gif Bad idea lol! But as you already said, using it on a copper block would be fine.
Well I would be installing my new loop then hopefully only removing the block once every 6 months or when I'm upgrading something. So I shouldn't be messing around with it too much. But I just want to clarify something with you, although you have kind of covered this already but I'm getting conflicting info. I was told by a couple of people that LU doesn't dry/cure! So one could remove the block, say for draining and cleaning, but reinstall the block on the CPU without having to clean it and reapplying even after it's been on there a few months. But it sounds like you're saying it DOES dry/cure, is that right???

Thanks again for your informative and in-depth post, really appreciate it pal.
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by euphoria4949 View Post

RavageTheEarth you are a star, thank you thumb.gif

I had seen some pics of this stuff being applied to alloy stun.gif Bad idea lol! But as you already said, using it on a copper block would be fine.
Well I would be installing my new loop then hopefully only removing the block once every 6 months or when I'm upgrading something. So I shouldn't be messing around with it too much. But I just want to clarify something with you, although you have kind of covered this already but I'm getting conflicting info. I was told by a couple of people that LU doesn't dry/cure! So one could remove the block, say for draining and cleaning, but reinstall the block on the CPU without having to clean it and reapplying even after it's been on there a few months. But it sounds like you're saying it DOES dry/cure, is that right???

Thanks again for your informative and in-depth post, really appreciate it pal.

Yes it DOES dry/cure after a certain period of time. You may even need to apply a little pressure to the block to get it off the CPU depending on how long it is on there, but nothing serious. If you take your time cleaning it off, you will be fine. Have fun!!!
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RavageTheEarth View Post

Yes it DOES dry/cure after a certain period of time. You may even need to apply a little pressure to the block to get it off the CPU depending on how long it is on there, but nothing serious. If you take your time cleaning it off, you will be fine. Have fun!!!

Oh right, ok thanks.
Really appreciate all your help.

Cheers thumb.gif
post #9 of 17
No problem man!
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RavageTheEarth View Post

No problem man!

Hi rolleyes.gif Sorry to bother you again.

I forgot to ask, is it correct that you only get enough Liquid Ultra in each tube for 1 application???
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