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Best Cherry MX switch for hunt and peck typing? - Page 7

post #61 of 65
Alright, so I'm also a hunt-and-peck typer, I actually do hunt for my keys even though I know mostly where they all are by memory. I type pretty fast as long as I am thinking the words rather than copying what I'm seeing on the screen (Obviously, since I have to look at the screen to copy it which means I can't see the keys).

I enjoy both gaming and typing, and most of my typing is on forums for games or etc. I also don't plan to use (m)any macros for gaming, my gaming will be simple WASD and mouse for anything not UI based (Such as opening the map or inventory). If I start typing I tend to type for a very long time as I like to share my opinions and have discussions, just the type (Pun) of person I am.

So, all-in-all, I am a keyhunter that enjoys simple function gaming (No ridiculously over the top macros) and typing for extended periods of time. I've decided to share my opinions here since the thread got pretty off topic and there aren't a whole lot of answers to the OP that involve evidence and etc. I'll now post my thoughts on each of the four major switches, blue, black, brown, and red.

Warning: Cherry MX Blue Switches (Click to show)

Type: Tactile-Clicky Switch
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: Yes
Actuation Force: 50g (60g Peak Force)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
My thoughts: Blue switches seem to be the worst for our needs. They are known as the "typing" switches as the noise and feel of them give a great indication of when you have pressed the key far enough for the keyboard to recognize the press. This is wonderful for anyone not looking at the keyboard, since now you can really on sound as well as touch and muscle memory to get the job done. You'll begin to type lighter and exert less energy while using these switches. However, for keyhunters like myself, you are already using sight to identify keys, and so the extra bump and click are completely wasted. Not only that, but since keyhunters are almost definitely going to bottom out on each key press, it won't be saving you any energy at all. Also these are probably the most useless keys for gaming as they can be distracting/annoying and aren't easy to press multiple times in a short period (such as double tapping). Speaking personally, these keys are nearly designed to thwart my entire keyboard usage.
Warning: Cherry MX Brown Switches (Click to show)

Type: Tactile Switch
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 45g (55g Peak Force)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
My thoughts: Brown switches seem okay. They are tactile just like the blue switches, which means they have that bump that lets you know when the keyboard has recognized the press. Again, this is great for a typer who doesn't hunt, but really does nothing for those of us that do. The good news is that the brown keys are lighter and easier to doubletap with. They are also quieter than their blue cousins, but only if you DON'T bottom out. Bottoming out on brown keys is very loud for some reason, and since keyhunters tend to do so, this would be slightly distracting/annoying. These keys are better than blues, but still have elements that are useless for keyhunters or hurt more than they help.
Warning: Cherry MX Black Switches (Click to show)

Type: Linear Switch
Tactile: No
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 60g (40g-80g overall)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
My thoughts: Black switches are pretty nice. They are linear, which is the best type of switch for us keyhunters. The key becomes easier to press as there is no resistance from the bump and it actually encourages bottoming out (Something we do all the time while gaming or typing). The black keys are more resistant to presses though, due to the type of spring. This means that you will use more effort to press the key, but you'll be making typos and etc. less often (However, you shouldn't be making many typos as a keyhunter since you are literally watching your hands hit each key). This is the switch for a gaming keyhunter that makes a lot of mistakes for some reason.
Warning: Cherry MX Red Switches (Click to show)

Type: Linear Switch
Tactile: No
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 45g
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
My thoughts: Red switches are great for us. They are linear and provide the same benefits there as the black switches, no wasted effort and it encourages bottoming out. The only real difference between the red and black switches are the type of spring used. The red switch uses a weaker spring, meaning it is much easier to push than the black switch. Being linear and resisting presses less means that you will be able to lightly dance around your keyboard when typing, rather then slamming each key with your finger. In gaming these keys are less good at double tapping than blacks, but not by much, and they are certainly better than blues or browns. The lack of much resistance means it will also take less effort to hold down keys such as WASD or press keys quickly when you need them. However this also means that you will be making typos more frequently as the keys will be pushed by accident easier (If you are bad at watching where your hands go). This is the switch for a gaming keyhunter that is accurate and wants to expend less effort.


All-in-all, the Cherry MX Reds seem to be the best key switches we can get as gaming keyhunters. Cherry MX Blacks are in for a second place, and you should use them if you like more resistance to your keys or make a lot of mistakes when typing. I personally will be using the reds as they fit everything I need perfectly; no wasted effort, easy to hit, tap well, and allow me to dance quickly around my keyboard lightly tapping away while scanning my keyboard for each one that I need.

Also, no matter which switches you pick, you are going to want to invest in some O-ring sound dampeners. Keyhunting is much louder than normal typing since you will almost always bottom out, and it is especially loud with a mechanical keyboard. The O-rings come in a few different types and fit under your keycap to suppress the noise your keys make when bottoming out without hurting their efficiency (It will actually raise efficiency slightly, as the key wont have to go down as far and you'll save some effort).

Thanks for reading, I made this account specifically for this post so I hope it helps out the OP and others. Credits to Manyak here for some of the technical information and Lethal Squirrel at Geekhack for the images.
Edited by ArdentSun - 6/21/13 at 4:16am
post #62 of 65
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArdentSun View Post

Alright, so I'm also a hunt-and-peck typer, I actually do hunt for my keys even though I know mostly where they all are by memory. I type pretty fast as long as I am thinking the words rather than copying what I'm seeing on the screen (Obviously, since I have to look at the screen to copy it which means I can't see the keys).

I enjoy both gaming and typing, and most of my typing is on forums for games or etc. I also don't plan to use (m)any macros for gaming, my gaming will be simple WASD and mouse for anything not UI based (Such as opening the map or inventory). If I start typing I tend to type for a very long time as I like to share my opinions and have discussions, just the type (Pun) of person I am.

So, all-in-all, I am a keyhunter that enjoys simple function gaming (No ridiculously over the top macros) and typing for extended periods of time. I've decided to share my opinions here since the thread got pretty off topic and there aren't a whole lot of answers to the OP that involve evidence and etc. I'll now post my thoughts on each of the four major switches, blue, black, brown, and red.

Warning: Cherry MX Blue Switches (Click to show)

Type: Tactile-Clicky Switch
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: Yes
Actuation Force: 50g (60g Peak Force)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
My thoughts: Blue switches seem to be the worst for our needs. They are known as the "typing" switches as the noise and feel of them give a great indication of when you have pressed the key far enough for the keyboard to recognize the press. This is wonderful for anyone not looking at the keyboard, since now you can really on sound as well as touch and muscle memory to get the job done. You'll begin to type lighter and exert less energy while using these switches. However, for keyhunters like myself, you are already using sight to identify keys, and so the extra bump and click are completely wasted. Not only that, but since keyhunters are almost definitely going to bottom out on each key press, it won't be saving you any energy at all. Also these are probably the most useless keys for gaming as they can be distracting/annoying and aren't easy to press multiple times in a short period (such as double tapping). Speaking personally, these keys are nearly designed to thwart my entire keyboard usage.
Warning: Cherry MX Brown Switches (Click to show)

Type: Tactile Switch
Tactile: Yes
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 45g (55g Peak Force)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
My thoughts: Brown switches seem okay. They are tactile just like the blue switches, which means they have that bump that lets you know when the keyboard has recognized the press. Again, this is great for a typer who doesn't hunt, but really does nothing for those of us that do. The good news is that the brown keys are lighter and easier to doubletap with. They are also quieter than their blue cousins, but only if you DON'T bottom out. Bottoming out on brown keys is very loud for some reason, and since keyhunters tend to do so, this would be slightly distracting/annoying. These keys are better than blues, but still have elements that are useless for keyhunters or hurt more than they help.
Warning: Cherry MX Black Switches (Click to show)

Type: Linear Switch
Tactile: No
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 60g (40g-80g overall)
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
My thoughts: Black switches are pretty nice. They are linear, which is the best type of switch for us keyhunters. The key becomes easier to press as there is no resistance from the bump and it actually encourages bottoming out (Something we do all the time while gaming or typing). The black keys are more resistant to presses though, due to the type of spring. This means that you will use more effort to press the key, but you'll be making typos and etc. less often (However, you shouldn't be making many typos as a keyhunter since you are literally watching your hands hit each key). This is the switch for a gaming keyhunter that makes a lot of mistakes for some reason.
Warning: Cherry MX Red Switches (Click to show)

Type: Linear Switch
Tactile: No
Clicky: No
Actuation Force: 45g
Key Travel: 2mm to actuation, 4mm to bottom
My thoughts: Red switches are great for us. They are linear and provide the same benefits there as the black switches, no wasted effort and it encourages bottoming out. The only real difference between the red and black switches are the type of spring used. The red switch uses a weaker spring, meaning it is much easier to push than the black switch. Being linear and resisting presses less means that you will be able to lightly dance around your keyboard when typing, rather then slamming each key with your finger. In gaming these keys are less good at double tapping than blacks, but not by much, and they are certainly better than blues or browns. The lack of much resistance means it will also take less effort to hold down keys such as WASD or press keys quickly when you need them. However this also means that you will be making typos more frequently as the keys will be pushed by accident easier (If you are bad at watching where your hands go). This is the switch for a gaming keyhunter that is accurate and wants to expend less effort.


All-in-all, the Cherry MX Reds seem to be the best key switches we can get as gaming keyhunters. Cherry MX Blacks are in for a second place, and you should use them if you like more resistance to your keys or make a lot of mistakes when typing. I personally will be using the reds as they fit everything I need perfectly; no wasted effort, easy to hit, tap well, and allow me to dance quickly around my keyboard lightly tapping away while scanning my keyboard for each one that I need.

Also, no matter which switches you pick, you are going to want to invest in some O-ring sound dampeners. Keyhunting is much louder than normal typing since you will almost always bottom out, and it is especially loud with a mechanical keyboard. The O-rings come in a few different types and fit under your keycap to suppress the noise your keys make when bottoming out without hurting their efficiency (It will actually raise efficiency slightly, as the key wont have to go down as far and you'll save some effort).

Thanks for reading, I made this account specifically for this post so I hope it helps out the OP and others. Credits to Manyak here for some of the technical information and Lethal Squirrel at Geekhack for the images.
Thanks for the help and welcome to Overclock!biggrin.gif
post #63 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by KKvantas View Post

Thanks for the help and welcome to Overclock!biggrin.gif
No problem and thanks, though I doubt I'll be active in this community. Also, for you personally the Brown keys might be the best. Since you have mentioned that you do in fact look at the screen while typing, the tactile bump should help a lot once you get used to it. The Brown switches are the keys meant for hybrid gamer/typists, but only if you watch the screen while typing. The reason I stressed red switches in my post was to help anyone who found this thread via google search (Such as myself) and was looking for some actual information regarding the thread name. Since your typing style is slightly different than what is expressed in the topic name, you may want browns over reds.
post #64 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by KKvantas View Post


Christ, if you aren't denying it until I post a video, you're predicting future wrist problems, aren't you?

Sounds like a cut-and-dried case of "haters gonna hate".
post #65 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by KKvantas View Post





HERE'S WHAT YOU'VE ALL BEEN ASKING FOR

Thats awesome. I wanted to see a video, not because I doubted you, but because I was curious as to what it would look like typing that fast with only two fingers.
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