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Confused about Peak Level Meter.

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Hello, Overclock community.
I downloaded Peak Level Meter from http://www.darkwooddesigns.co.uk/pc2/meters.html a short while ago.
The software shows four bars, each with different character assigned: L, R, M, S. I understand L and R stand for Left and Right, and my mono microphone detects both having the same intensity.
I don't know why the M bar is taller than the other ones, nor what M stands for. Also, which is the "real" intensity? L and R, or M? The S bar is lower than the other three.
Is callibration required?
Thanks biggrin.gif.
post #2 of 4
L = Left Chanel
R = Right Chanel
M = Middle Chanel
S = Sub-woofer Chanel.

Since the graphs represent the relative volume levels of line level signals, calibration is not relevant, unless you want O db to relate to some actual loudness produced by the amp and speakers playing the sound.

What are you trying to accomplish?
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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Thanks, man, that was helpful.
My goal is to know the intensity produced by a LP under several different situations.
What I need is a way to measure the sound produced. Tried TrueRTA, but it gave many different amplitudes, each with different intensity.
Peak Level Meter gives three intensities, and I'm not sure which to consider for catching data. (Still, better than the complete mess of TrueRTA).
post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by TetePaqui View Post

Thanks, man, that was helpful.
My goal is to know the intensity produced by a LP under several different situations.
What I need is a way to measure the sound produced. Tried TrueRTA, but it gave many different amplitudes, each with different intensity.
Peak Level Meter gives three intensities, and I'm not sure which to consider for catching data. (Still, better than the complete mess of TrueRTA).

What you're trying to do is impossible. Why? Because God made it so when he designed the universe.

All sounds (other than a pure tome in a non-reverberant room) are made up of an infinite number of frequencies.
If you measure the loudness of, say Middle C on a piano (261 hertz) you can get a number representing it's loudness. But what about 262 hertz, or 261.00005 hertz? There are an infinite number of frequencies. so, you can't average them out because you can't divide by infinity. So you choose a finite number of frequencies (3, 5 100, 10,000, ???) to measure and average together. The more you measure the more accurate the average will be.

Then there's the issue of time. You mentioned a "Peak" level measurement. If you measured, again, only Middle C during, say, a half hour long live symphony there would be times when Middle C was only 1/2 as loud. If the orchestra moved to another hall, would, Middle C still be 1/2 as loud at the same time as in the other hall? or would it be 0.500001 times as loud, or 0.4 or 0.6 times as loud?

Another problem is that the "loudness" we hear is different that the loudness that we measure because our brains interpret different frequencies differently and meters don't. (see Fletcher–Munson curves).

An other problem is that the exact same sound source will produce different frequencies in different enviroments.



Perhaps if you could explain "My goal is to know the intensity produced by a LP under several different situations." a little more, I could offer some suggestions. Also, how much money do you want to spend on this?
Edited by billbartuska - 6/1/13 at 1:13am
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Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
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2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
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