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Quick question about grip styles

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
This has probably been answered before, but I don't know what the answer is. I'm sure most people here are familiar with palm, claw, and fingertip grip. My question is what's the terminology for this difference in grip style:

Style 1:
-middle finger rests on right click button (if you're right handed)
-ring finger + pinkie finger rests on right side of mouse

Style 2:
-middle finger rests on scroll wheel
-ring finger rests on right click button
-pinkie finger grips right side of mouse


How do you refer to as Style 1 and Style 2? Is there even a term for this? I feel like this is a very important distinction in talking about mice ergonomics, as if you're one of the unfortunate bastards like me who use Style 2, it totally changes which mice can be appropriate.
Edited by chilledinsanity - 5/30/13 at 5:52pm
post #2 of 15
I don't think there really is a specific term for that. I do the same thing though and I love ambidextrous mice, so maybe take a look at some of those.
post #3 of 15
Style 1 is pretty much how your fingers are arranged with any mouse grip. The shape of your hand and your fingers'/hand's contact points with the mouse "define" the grip then.

Style 2 is a variation of palm grip I'd say. But to be honest, while it is hard to change from say palm to fingertip, getting used to a different arrangement of your fingers is only a matter of a few hours of focused mouse usage.
post #4 of 15
I refer to those finger positions as the "2 finger" or "3 finger" ____ grip. As in, two fingers on top of the mouse or three.

I use the 3 finger palm grip.

It is true these types of finger placements do change how the shape of a mouse feels / performs for the user. The Zowie EC2 is pretty good for my 3 finger palm grip, but when I use the 2 finger palm grip it is to small (gives me cramps when I grasp tightly). Same could be said for the Zowie AM.

So a thin or wide mouse could work for the 3 finger grips, but the same cannot be said for the 2 finger grips. That is why it is great Zowie has 2 sizes for the EC mice. Steel Series offers more sizes, with a similar shape, but the mice are not the same.

If I ran a mouse company, I would make two sizes of a mouse (at least in width) when it makes sense to do that for the particular shape/design, that way each type of finger placement has a choice. Although, like I said, a wider mouse works for both finger positions.

I would have made two sizes for the Zowie FK and two coatings. The current size, also, one that is taller and wider. A glossy and a non gloss -- or maybe a grainy plastic type mouse instead of two coatings.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phl0w View Post

Style 2 is a variation of palm grip I'd say. But to be honest, while it is hard to change from say palm to fingertip, getting used to a different arrangement of your fingers is only a matter of a few hours of focused mouse usage.
It's not that I'm actually married to one style or the other. What it comes down to for me is comfort and functionality. You simply have access to more buttons more rapidly with style 2 that you do with style 1. So far the only mouse I've seen that could actually give me as much functionality with style 1 as I get with style 2 has been a prototype mouse:



I really prefer having at least one button for each finger. Having only the thumb and two fingers at my disposal feels much more limiting. This tends to steer me towards ambidextrous mice since they're one of the few that allow it (Zowie frustratingly forces you on one side). Also also it's nice not having to swap back and forth between the same finger constantly for things like scrolling on web pages. Before the scroll wheel died on me, I was using a Steelseries Xai. I found the shape so-so, but with it, I was able to easily access 6 buttons in gaming (I disabled one for my pinky, but could hit the other pinky one fine). It can really help for complex games when you need to access several functions frequently. I find it infinitely more intuitive than crazy MMO mice that have a dozen or so buttons all devoted to the thumb.

So while I COULD adapt to style 1 easily and it would probably be more comfortable, in terms of functionality, it would be like cutting off two of my fingers, which I don't see as something to strive for.
post #6 of 15
The Razer Taipan lets you configure all 9 buttons (lmb+rmb+wheel+2 on each side+2 vertically aligned behind wheel) in any way you like including macros. Also, it's really ambidextrous not like Zowie that restrict you to one side or the other.
Sounds Perfect?Well, iIf you're into fps then avago's 9800 sensor will drive you crazy.
For anything else a mighty fine mouse. I use it for Photo editing and general desktop work.
Don't think you asked for mice advice though, but just wanted an answer to your question, right?

I get what you want to achieve with your style 2. However, isn't it really unstable to hold your mouse with pinky and use it to press buttons at the same time? Can't imagine playing high paced games like this.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by phl0w View Post

I get what you want to achieve with your style 2. However, isn't it really unstable to hold your mouse with pinky and use it to press buttons at the same time? Can't imagine playing high paced games like this.

I think you misunderstand them. I use mainly "style 2" palm grip to play games like Quake. The point is not using all fingers to press buttons, but to not waste any fingers. My pinkie only holds the mouse. My thumb, index, middle and ring finger all get assigned high usage functions which may need to be activated idependently. That way I can take a big work load off my keyboard hand without compromising my aim. Provided I have a suitable mouse.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
The Razer Taipan lets you configure all 9 buttons (lmb+rmb+wheel+2 on each side+2 vertically aligned behind wheel) in any way you like including macros. Also, it's really ambidextrous not like Zowie that restrict you to one side or the other.
I've considered this mouse, but wasn't sure of the shape, plus I thought it might be too small for someone with larger hands. Also while not a dealbreaker, I'm not fond of the idea of what I've heard about having software DRM for their mice now, it sounds insane.

Quote:
Don't think you asked for mice advice though, but just wanted an answer to your question, right?
Ah it's fine, I don't mind suggestions, though I've probably heard of them. Right now I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the Avior 8200 will have a good shape; waiting for reviews on that.

Quote:
I get what you want to achieve with your style 2. However, isn't it really unstable to hold your mouse with pinky and use it to press buttons at the same time? Can't imagine playing high paced games like this.
No, I think it really depends on your grip and style. The way I do it, it's no more unstable than using your thumb. When I press the right side button, I'm not pressing it with my fingertip, but the inside of my pinky knuckle, it's a very short move. Also I just checked as a test, my thumb will sometimes tense up slightly on the other end to provide support, it keeps the mouse stable, I never have problems aiming using style 2.

I use mostly in between a palm and claw grip however, it's the inside of my hand that holds the mouse, not my fingers. If someone was using a fingertip grip, I could see where this wouldn't be practical at all.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
plus I thought it might be too small for someone with larger hands.
Actually it's more on the larg side. WMO ballpark (plus dented sides), and quite heavy too. I think though, its side buttons are positioned too high to be pressed comfortable without losing a stable grip. IIRC it was even mentioned in one of the many reviews.
Still, if it wasn't for the sensor, it would make for an amazing mouse. Build quality, weight, size, materials, coating are all excellent (the exception being its small feet, but I like high friction, so that's fine), and Razer's latest Synapse update is fine too imo. And it's not like as if the mouse wouldn't work without the software. For full customization though, you need Synapse ofc.
post #10 of 15
Sensor isn't my concern with that mouse. It's more or less the flared front end. Kills my specific grip.

I didn't have an issue w/ button placement. That was quite nice actually.
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