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First 12Gb/s SSD review

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
This is a pretty neat article, the first review of a 12Gb/s SSD.

http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/5517/world-exclusive-toshiba-px02sm-series-12gb-s-enterprise-ssd-review/index.html
post #2 of 10
Nice Computurd
You should throw here some non-enterprise benchmarks.
That test system is definitely something i like to have man,those 128GB of DDR3.I dont understand that somebody cant invent how to install OS on those 128GB DDR3.
post #3 of 10
Nice read comp, about time for something new in ssd world. thumb.gif
post #4 of 10
Nice read comp, about time for something new in ssd world. thumb.gif
post #5 of 10
So are they saying that the 4k QD4 reads at reaching to ~78MB/s? Why no 4K QD1... I bet it still sucks.
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Just a 'puter
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 6700K ASUS Maximus VIII Hero iGPU thanks to Nvidia 970 3.5GB Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK8GX4M2B3200C16 
Hard DriveHard DriveCoolingCooling
Samsung 950 PRO 512GB Crucial M4 256GB RX360 V3 Koolance CPU-380I 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
Koolance RP-452X2 Reservoir Koolance PMP-450 12V Variable Speed Pump Windows 10 Pro x64 benq XL2411Z 
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logitech G510 Seasonic X-760 Corsair 800D Mionix Castor 
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Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium HD DT 990 Premium 250Ohm 
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post #6 of 10
Why no 4K QD 1? These are enterprise drives, tested and used at QD 256, they aren't just fooling around at a QD of 1.

Note that MB/s is barely mentioned in this review, as it is much to simple a metric in the enterprise environment. The simplistic measurements used for consumer SSDs won't reveal a SSD's performance in that situation.

If you want to see how consumer SSDs stand up in the same kind of testing, check this review:

http://www.tweaktown.com/articles/5392/consumer-samsung-and-ocz-vs-enterprise-smart-optimus-ssd-performance-analysis/index.html
post #7 of 10
Yes this is nice from Computurd,open thread with link to another page and then don't even bother to reply to guys that are interested in this story.I think they call it spamming or am i wrong?
Edited by Unit Igor - 5/31/13 at 11:32pm
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unit Igor View Post

Nice Computurd
You should throw here some non-enterprise benchmarks.
That test system is definitely something i like to have man,those 128GB of DDR3.I dont understand that somebody cant invent how to install OS on those 128GB DDR3.

That's an interesting idea, installing an OS on a RAM disk. With more boards and Windows versions that support even 32GB of memory, installing an OS on 24GB could be possible.

How about software that is run as an option in the BIOS/UEFI, or as an Option ROM during POST. RAID Option ROMs create RAID volumes from SATA disks, they aren't formatted but Windows formats them during the installation. Given the capabilities of UEFI firmware beyond BIOS firmware, that has 64bit addressing, and UEFI firmware's add ons or extensions features, that might be possible.

Here's part of the trick and problem with a RAM disk for an OS; a RAM disk is part of the Windows NTFS file system, correct? It has a drive letter, we can create folders and store files on it just like a HDD or SSD. But is the RAM disk part of the SATA interface?

No, it's not part of the SATA interface, and does not use the SATA controller or its driver, such as IRST. The RAM disk software on my ASRock board creates an entry in Storage Controllers in Device Manager, and uses its own driver. So to create a RAM disk outside of an OS, its driver would need to be executed before it could be created. A Windows installation allows us to load drivers, but after the target drive is selected. But it seems like this could be done... somehow.

There are large RAM disk devices that exist for enterprise use, are they used for an OS? I don't know, but it seems in order to create a RAM disk before an OS exists, access to a board's firmware (UEFI) is necessary, and perhaps support from the OS installation process.
post #9 of 10
Yes parsec you are again totally right.We need something in bios to create ram-disk or maybe something like parted magic that loads data on ram outside Windows.Instead of shutting down pc all we need is to put it in sleep.If electricity goes down we need some time to save everything on SSD and with one good back-up ups we can even solve that problem.
Here you go AS Rock,Biostar,Sapphire and all the other small players in motherboard businesses,here is your opportunity to take bigger piece of cake.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Sorry about that fellas...i also posted in news and was replying over there. Consumer benchmarks on these drives do not look as pretty as you would think, they are really designed for heavy use, in my experience some of the fastest enterprise gear is slow as heck when used in consumer environment.
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