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[AMD] AMD Teases A Mysterious Picture - Page 25

post #241 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by KyadCK View Post

No kidding.

Just some little mention at the end, like for Intel on the Dell commercials. "Uncharted 4, only on the PS4, Powered by AMD". I dunno, I just want them to get more out there. They have good products for "mainstream" usage (AKA, APU Territory), but no one really knows them besides people who pay attention to the market.
That is indeed true people tend to go with Nvidia or Intel becaus they know the name from mouth to mouth(giggity) and from the massive advertising spray on tv/internet/games/laptop stickers etc
I guess it takes a single commercial feuturing one of the new consoles be it PS4 or Xbox one "The future is Fusion" that would turn some heads.
post #242 of 260
The suspense is over. Amd has revealed a trailer for its new line of APUs along with a few details, which were expected. rolleyes.gif here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUwjXQjQZZM . The trailer looks amazing lets hope the APUs are too thumb.gif It's good that AMD is spending some money & time on marketing & advertising, in which it was lacking heavily, its case was just like that of HTC.
post #243 of 260
This marketing add is great, sell the xbox1 and ps4 cpu/gpu (apu) to the "masses"...

ALot of ppl will say "yes i have a ps4/xbox1 in pc."

The monsters are stuttering. I am kidding

Die you blue, intel much, monsters!!!
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post #244 of 260
What a cool trailer.
post #245 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoBeeJ View Post

This marketing add is great, sell the xbox1 and ps4 cpu/gpu (apu) to the "masses"...

ALot of ppl will say "yes i have a ps4/xbox1 in pc."

The monsters are stuttering. I am kidding

Die you blue, intel much, monsters!!!
Figured there should be Nvidia green monsters without legs don't you think xD
post #246 of 260
There's hidden content in the trailer. I saw 4.4 GHZ + HSA on the HUD's lol.

2:18

4.4ghz APU?!

Sick trailer
post #247 of 260
Insane trailer biggrin.gif
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post #248 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by KyadCK View Post

Right, so how do you plan to solve the PCI-e latency issue that you completely ignored?

Oh, and PCI-e can just barely provide enough bandwidth to even tie with RAM, let alone be faster. GDDR5's bandwidth does not apply over the 8 or 16 bit bus that is the GPU's connection to the system.

Not to mention overhead that has to be accounted for, the extra jumps it takes to get there (VRAM -> GPU -> NB -> HT -> CPU/NB -> Cache -> CPU vs RAM -> IMC -> Cache -> CPU), the speed of HyperTransport which cuts down the bandwidth even more, the fact that going over HT means waiting in line with everything else that needs to be talked to, and so on.

There is less VRAM then there is System RAM, even today, and GDDR5 already has worse latency even without having to jump through hoops to get there. VRAM GDDR5's speed is completely negated by the protocols needed to get it where it needs to go. If you need more speed, VRAM hurts.

Oh, and I was wrong, it's "Heterogeneous Uniform Memory Access". One memory source for all things, not unified address space. We've had that for years now. Lets take a look:

SOURCE

HUMA: Combined memory for the CPU and GPU.
HSA: Programing to make using the GPU half easier.

So, who still thinks trying to get the CPU to use a GPU's VRAM is a good idea and can actually back up their statement with fact that wouldn't make it a worse alternative to just using system RAM.

You either didn't read or didn't understand my post. I would encourage you to completely read the comments you choose to reply to in the future. If you don't understand what the other person is posting, I would encourage you to ask for clarification instead of writing some rant arguing against points the other person didn't even promote.

For example: I didn't ignore the PCI-E latency or bandwidth issues. If you had bothered to read the part where I wrote "memory managers could certainly be made smart enough to intelligently allocate space in a way that makes sense (ie a CPU thread allocates a chunk of available memory and that memory is chosen to be in system memory instead of GPU memory if available but bleeds over if not)," you would have understood that. Clearly, a program running on the CPU would allocate system memory if available. Likewise, a thread running on the GPU is going to want to allocate memory on the GPU. I almost didn't bother writing that sentence because it's so obvious, but I did just in case someone wasn't very familiar with the technology happened to read about it. Yet somehow, you still managed to miss the point and decided to rail against me when the point you think I missed actually happens to be the very point I made.

Secondly: Like it or not, uniform memory access refers to a memory model of accessing the memory pools of multiple devices. UMA is uniform where all devices access any memory location with the same speed and latency (such as older SMP architectures when the memory controller was still in the Northbridge). NUMA is non-uniform where there are varying degrees of latency and bandwidth depending on which memory address you access (such as modern SMP architectures from AMD where each CPU has its own memory bank and accesses that go over hops are slower). A unified address space is a big part of accomplishing ease of access to these various pools of memory, and with HUMA the CPU and GPU can access each other's memory without any special commands. The CPU may read a texture from the GPU's memory and modify it or the GPU may read a block of data directly from system memory without the program necessarily even being aware of the underlying memory hardware for instance. The same commands work for both. This is a big bonus for developers.

Your graphic serves to reinforce the point I originally implied. I will now be more verbose. The APU model shows a NUMA architecture where the GPU's memory is still logically segmented away from regular system memory even though physically it's the same pool. The HSA model using a HUMA architecture completely unifies access to the entire pool between both classes of devices--CPU and GPU alike. You could extend the memory addressing benefits to discrete cards as well, and if the memory management logic were updated accordingly it could still be of real benefit even if there are underlying physical differences among the various devices adding to the memory pool.

I think a big part of the mistake you're making is to assume anyone who wants to access GPU memory from the CPU is wanting to do so for speed reasons. It would certainly be folly to think that accessing a fast pool of memory will still be fast if you have to go through a slow link to get there. There would be little benefit to the CPU using GPU memory "just because", but there are many valid use cases where it can be faster to access GPU memory directly. The reason I would want it, as a developer, would be for the ease of working on data with different devices more easily. If you're going to chew on a chunk of data a lot, you'd copy it over (say a piece of a texture from a GPU's memory to the CPU's memory), work on it (some CPU-based transform perhaps), and copy it back to where it needs to go (back to the GPU since ultimately it's what is going to need it). If you're only going to do a very quick process to a chunk of data (like flip a few bits inside a large chunk of memory), you'd be better served by simply doing the process directly if copying it twice would be slower. That is a clear use case that satisfies your request's conditions.
post #249 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noctizzle View Post

There's hidden content in the trailer. I saw 4.4 GHZ + HSA on the HUD's lol.

2:18

4.4ghz APU?!

Sick trailer
A10-6800K has 4.4GHz turbo.

"HSA optimization in progress" means we have to wait for 1st HSA APU (Kaveri).
post #250 of 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapulek View Post

A10-6800K has 4.4GHz turbo.

"HSA optimization in progress" means we have to wait for 1st HSA APU (Kaveri).
At the end it says done though.
But I guess as the arch has only been optimized a bit we won't see it until Kaveri anyway.
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