Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Hardware News › [Various] Intel Haswell Reviews
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

[Various] Intel Haswell Reviews - Page 45

post #441 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkBlade6 View Post

Get a cheapo Ivy pentium + a 7750 for around 140$ , thats better than A10-6800K for about the same price and you wont have to buy high clocked memory (plus you have will have an 1155 motherboard , so you can upgrade to a core i5 at some point)

You know Tom's Hardware dropped the Pentiums from the recommended budget buys, and replaced them with an old Athlon II X4 640 and Phenom II X4 965 due to recent games' multithread support? And THW is not known for being AMD-friendly.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-overclock,3106-2.html


EDIT: APU prices:



$120 for an A10 5800K, or $140 for a higher clocked and somewhat less power hungry 6800K. The Radeon 7750 is around $90-$100 as of now. That's $50-$60 for a CPU.
Quote:
Originally Posted by demoship View Post

An office/school that's cheap enough to care about such miniscule power savings would turn off their computers at the end of the day (and a lot of schools do, not so much offices), and that difference would be like 50X the difference of the CPU alone going into a low power mode.

Not to mention the savings I mentioned are the maximum possible savings. Those savings don't come into play if there's a load on the CPU, or if the machine's off. And for a datacenter with servers, it's even less relevant because the majority of servers have some kind of load on them 24/7. The haswell sleep modes are tailor made for laptops and other battery powered devices.

At my school, it's standard policy to leave all computers on throughout the day (so nobody has to wait for 5 minutes of bootup) and night (for remote updating and software maintenance). Our school district's tech department is so small that we have two computer labs completely filled with broken computers (purple screen, BIOS not booting, Ethernet port not working, somebody attempted to OC a Pentium D and burnt a VRM, etc).

Not to mention the average computer spends a lot of time idling or lightly loaded.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fulvin View Post

Now, here's some RAM for your upcoming Haswell rigs. lachen.gif

For $4000... I could buy a thermoelectric cooling system and put the rest of the money into the electrical bills account.
Edited by A Bad Day - 6/2/13 at 4:11pm
post #442 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by CL3P20 View Post

I was testing vantage on air with 4670k at 4.8ghz.. not sure what all the fuss is about with these HW clock scares..

Any tips you can share?

As far as what? OC'ing? Cooling?

I try to stick close to a 2:1 ratio for SVID to vcore (or as close as possible) for stability. This should help to keep a lower vcore. As well.. its important to boost your IO Digital and IO analog voltages by a small amount. The delta between them is also a critical thing to balance.

*I run a zalman cnps10x with a single 120mm for air cooling
post #443 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by CL3P20 View Post

As far as what? OC'ing? Cooling?

I try to stick close to a 2:1 ratio for SVID to vcore (or as close as possible) for stability. This should help to keep a lower vcore. As well.. its important to boost your IO Digital and IO analog voltages by a small amount. The delta between them is also a critical thing to balance.

*I run a zalman cnps10x with a single 120mm for air cooling

When's the guide coming up chief?
post #444 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Bad Day View Post

You know Tom's Hardware dropped the Pentiums from the recommended budget buys, and replaced them with an old Athlon II X4 640 and Phenom II X4 965 due to recent games' multithread support? And THW is not known for being AMD-friendly.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-overclock,3106-2.html


EDIT: APU prices:



$120 for an A10 5800K, or $140 for a higher clocked and somewhat less power hungry 6800K. Oh, and the Radeon 7750 is around $90-$100 as of now. That's $50-$60 for a CPU.
At my school, it's standard policy to leave all computers on throughout the day (so nobody has to wait for 5 minutes of bootup) and night (for remote updating and software maintenance). Our school district's tech department is so small that we have two computer labs completely filled with broken computers (purple screen, BIOS not booting, Ethernet port not working, somebody attempted to OC a Pentium D and burnt a VRM, etc).

Not to mention the average computer spends a lot of time idling or lightly loaded.
For $4000... I could buy a thermoelectric cooling system and put the rest of the money into the electrical bills account.

Well, I think a computer has to be pretty much totally idle to realize most of the haswell power savings. My CPU usually has about a 3% load on it 24/7 from uTorrent (and I'm sure my multiple hard drives being run 24/7 use more power then the CPU). That small load would likely block the CPU from being able to go into a sleep mode. For a desktop PC, it uses 100+ watts idling, just to keep the PSU on (there's some amount of current it uses up regardless of how much load is on it), fans, hard drives, etc..

Again.. the haswell power features are a selling point for battery powered devices ONLY. Only an idiot would spend $250 (not to mention cost of mobo, and time and effort) upgrading from something like sandy/ivy because they want to save 8 watts of power when their desktop is idling. (If they want to upgrade for other reasons, that's a different story). If someone doesn't have a problem using 100+ watts of energy idling their computer, they're not going to care if the CPU's slightly more efficient. A tablet might consume < 20 watts TOTAL while idling. Cutting just a few watts off the CPU usage is huge there.
post #445 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuivamaa View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by looniam View Post

http://www.neoseeker.com/forums/17/t1837738-amd-a10-5800k-vs-intel-core-i3-3220-head-to-head/


and add ~60 watts for the 7750
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/HIS/HD_7750_IceQ_X/26.html


looks like the same . . .

edit: yes i know that an i3 and not a pentium but the power draw is roughly the same; i would even speculate that it would be slightly more bc of the hyperthreading. but lets stick to facts.

Power maybe, performance would suffer though. Eg.



And Dota 2 is a poorly threaded game in which an i3 apparently keeps up with i5/fx-8350, yet the pentium is way behind. And let's not talk mmos (Ghz hungry) and multithreaded games like FC3/BF3/Crysis 3 which paint a truly grim picture.
Pentiums and the rest of the pure dual cores are history.

no lets not; since this is a haswell thread where debating the performance difference of a glorified HTPC and a very low budget intel gaming setup has no place. . . and it does take a bit of humility to admit being wrong instead bringing out the smoke and mirrors. thumb.gif
loon 3.2
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770K Asus P8Z77-V Pro EVGA 980TI SC+ 16Gb PNY ddr3 1866 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
PNY 1311 240Gb 1 TB Seagate 3 TB WD Blue DVD DVDRW+/- 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
EKWB P280 kit EK-VGA supremacy Win X LG 24MC57HQ-P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Zero [blues] EVGA SuperNova 750 G2 Stryker M [hammered and drilled] corsair M65 
AudioAudio
SB Recon3D Klipsch ProMedia 2.1  
  hide details  
Reply
loon 3.2
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770K Asus P8Z77-V Pro EVGA 980TI SC+ 16Gb PNY ddr3 1866 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
PNY 1311 240Gb 1 TB Seagate 3 TB WD Blue DVD DVDRW+/- 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
EKWB P280 kit EK-VGA supremacy Win X LG 24MC57HQ-P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Zero [blues] EVGA SuperNova 750 G2 Stryker M [hammered and drilled] corsair M65 
AudioAudio
SB Recon3D Klipsch ProMedia 2.1  
  hide details  
Reply
post #446 of 858
I don't know what all the fuss about with temps is. I'm using an h100 with a 4670k @ 4.5GHz 1.25v and getting 67c or so.


Got the CPU/Board as a bundle from NCIX for $375 (wish I lived near a Microcenter) and then went to CC that had refurb h100 for $70 and I got an additional 20% off because it was open box and had no TIM (not an issue). Total was $480 after taxes.

The Asus Z87-A is rock solid and a great deal for such a low price. The only thing I was hesitant about was the gold/yellow layout but after putting it in my case I noticed it matches my Season X-760 biggrin.gif so it looks pretty good. The Gigabyte 670 with blue PCB kinda throws off the overall look but that is being replaced with a Gigabyte 780 WindForce on Monday and that, thankfully, has a black PCB biggrin.gif
MkV
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 6700K Asus Prime Z270-A Asus GTX 1070 Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Crucial MX300 525GB WD 4TB Green WD 4TB Green Corsair H60 
OSMonitorPowerCase
Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit ASUS PB278Q 27" 2560x1440 EVGA SuperNova G2 650W NZXT S340 White 
Mouse
Corsair M60 
  hide details  
Reply
MkV
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 6700K Asus Prime Z270-A Asus GTX 1070 Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Crucial MX300 525GB WD 4TB Green WD 4TB Green Corsair H60 
OSMonitorPowerCase
Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit ASUS PB278Q 27" 2560x1440 EVGA SuperNova G2 650W NZXT S340 White 
Mouse
Corsair M60 
  hide details  
Reply
post #447 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayek View Post

I don't know what all the fuss about with temps is. I'm using an h100 with a 4670k @ 4.5GHz 1.25v and getting 67c or so.


Got the CPU/Board as a bundle from NCIX for $375 (wish I lived near a Microcenter) and then went to CC that had refurb h100 for $70 and I got an additional 20% off because it was open box and had no TIM (not an issue). Total was $480 after taxes.

The Asus Z87-A is rock solid and a great deal for such a low price. The only thing I was hesitant about was the gold/yellow layout but after putting it in my case I noticed it matches my Season X-760 biggrin.gif so it looks pretty good. The Gigabyte 670 with blue PCB kinda throws off the overall look but that is being replaced with a Gigabyte 780 WindForce on Monday and that, thankfully, has a black PCB biggrin.gif
67 on a cpu even if overclocked isn't good at all.
Especially since you using a high end watercooling solution with only this attached.
If you want it for overclocking I advise to either delid it or to wait till the second revision which will have this fixed if it turns out to be real bad.
post #448 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by CL3P20 View Post


As far as what? OC'ing? Cooling?

I try to stick close to a 2:1 ratio for SVID to vcore (or as close as possible) for stability. This should help to keep a lower vcore. As well.. its important to boost your IO Digital and IO analog voltages by a small amount. The delta between them is also a critical thing to balance.

*I run a zalman cnps10x with a single 120mm for air cooling


OCing.  Tips on the voltages (as you gave) are great.  I also read in Asus's guide that setting the cache ratio can make a big difference - any comment on that?

post #449 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Bad Day View Post

You know Tom's Hardware dropped the Pentiums from the recommended budget buys, and replaced them with an old Athlon II X4 640 and Phenom II X4 965 due to recent games' multithread support? And THW is not known for being AMD-friendly.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-overclock,3106-2.html


EDIT: APU prices:



$120 for an A10 5800K, or $140 for a higher clocked and somewhat less power hungry 6800K. The Radeon 7750 is around $90-$100 as of now. That's $50-$60 for a CPU.
At my school, it's standard policy to leave all computers on throughout the day (so nobody has to wait for 5 minutes of bootup) and night (for remote updating and software maintenance). Our school district's tech department is so small that we have two computer labs completely filled with broken computers (purple screen, BIOS not booting, Ethernet port not working, somebody attempted to OC a Pentium D and burnt a VRM, etc).

Not to mention the average computer spends a lot of time idling or lightly loaded.
For $4000... I could buy a thermoelectric cooling system and put the rest of the money into the electrical bills account.

Fact :

A 7750 is much better than ANY iGPU
AM3/FM1/FM2 Quad core are better than any SB/IVY Pentium

You can get a 7750 + a Ivy pentium for about 150$
You can get a 6800k for about 150$ (not everybody has acces to microcenter kthx)

Now the question is , would u prefer a much better GPU to play Video games or a better CPU?! (note that the Ivy pentium is not a bottleneck for a 7750 wink wink)
post #450 of 858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post


OCing.  Tips on the voltages (as you gave) are great.  I also read in Asus's guide that setting the cache ratio can make a big difference - any comment on that?

where can I find the asus guide?
MkV
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 6700K Asus Prime Z270-A Asus GTX 1070 Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Crucial MX300 525GB WD 4TB Green WD 4TB Green Corsair H60 
OSMonitorPowerCase
Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit ASUS PB278Q 27" 2560x1440 EVGA SuperNova G2 650W NZXT S340 White 
Mouse
Corsair M60 
  hide details  
Reply
MkV
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i5 6700K Asus Prime Z270-A Asus GTX 1070 Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4-3000 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Crucial MX300 525GB WD 4TB Green WD 4TB Green Corsair H60 
OSMonitorPowerCase
Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit ASUS PB278Q 27" 2560x1440 EVGA SuperNova G2 650W NZXT S340 White 
Mouse
Corsair M60 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Hardware News
Overclock.net › Forums › Industry News › Hardware News › [Various] Intel Haswell Reviews