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post #71 of 89
Fra-gil-e? Must've been an Italian engineer. Personally I'm waiting for Madrid to slip and see if we have bridges left. Then we'll know.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master__Shake View Post

i read the comments too, turns out the driver measured the height of his load and the maximum height on the bridge wasn't posted...

10 dollar sign 15 million dollar bridge...yep stupidity has won the day.
Truck won though didn't it? tongue.gif
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post #72 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackVenom View Post

Fra-gil-e? Must've been an Italian engineer.

Or that's just how it's spelled rolleyes.gif
post #73 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrak View Post

Or that's just how it's spelled rolleyes.gif
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085334/
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post #74 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by hatlesschimp View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by barcode71 View Post

I think you're very confused and over generalizing infrastructure with consumer electronics. Don't know where you get "4 years" from. At this point it sounds more like a personal rant than fact.

It's not whether things lasted longer "back in the day" vs now. It's a matter of how much you're willing to pay. People with your mentality expect to pay little and want things to last forever. You get what you pay for.

Last time I checked cars are still made to last. Passenger aircraft are made to last. Houses are built to last. Heck, my MacBook from 9 years ago is still going strong.

With everything made today (cars, boats, tvs, computer parts, vibrators) they set out to achieve it and for it to last for a reasonably practicable time. nothing more nothing less. Same with buildings and structures. they could design and build a building that would last 2000 years but they dont. Why because they dont see that as being reasonably practicable. Life expectancy is one of the first things they look at and determine when designing because it under pins the materials, designs and costs.

Everything today is commercial and meant to last a short time so that businesses can do business.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blooddrunk View Post

Not to get into politics too much, but WA cut back on road maintenance funding a LOT in the past years. I think all 5 of the bridges around where I live are listed as structurally deficient with no funding to replace or properly fix them.

Its scary stuff, and sadly it will probably require a bigger disaster before any action is done. We've got 60 year old bridges carrying 10x, if not more traffic flow than they were originally designed for.

Well i was over in Italy and not the nice parts and their starting to let the place go. I know its an old beautiful cultural country with thousands of years of history but basic things are getting neglected. I feared for my life on the roads.

Or people are expecting to pay little and get everything in return. A product will generally only last as long as how durable the material was used and that's where cost comes in.

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post #75 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tunechi View Post

Or people are expecting to pay little and get everything in return. A product will generally only last as long as how durable the material was used and that's where cost comes in.

That is only half the equation though! You have to factor in growth as an extreme variable. In some locations you can go from 1k cars a month and the bridge can last 30 years, to the next year 1mil cars a month and the bridge suddenly lasting 3 years, because a couple businesses decided to move.
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post #76 of 89
Haw, I just remembered a big news story here in Pittsburgh when a bunch (like 7) of barges broke away on the Mon.

they hit 3 bridges, and they closed them all for inspection. At the time, I thought it was being way overcautious, but I guess not! All 3 bridges were re-opened within 24 hours.

Of course, that was the concrete foundations in the water, not the superstructure.
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post #77 of 89
The Army Corp of Engineers rated US infrastructure a D- (and now a D+).
The infrastructure of the US, particularly in the older eastern states, has been significantly neglected and is hampering your economy immensely.
Without adequate infrastructure, no economy. Pure and simple. The cost upgrade infrastructure to adequate roading / transport standards like in Central and Western Europe (German civil engineering building techniques and transport logistics are absolutely world leading) or building structure standards like in earthquake-prone Japan and here in New Zealand (which we both have the strictest building codes in the world [and we bumped them up even more post Chch quake [see sig]. California's earthquake proof standards are significantly lower than both Japan's and New Zealand's) is MASSIVE for the US.
If you don't follow building standards, maintain them and strictly enforce them, people die. Pure and simple. Most, if not all of the deaths from my home city's quakes were either from old masonry from historic buildings falling on people or a building that shouldn't of seen the light of day multiple times if it wasn't for total negligence every single time.

Estimated cost: US $3.6 trillion dollars by 2020.

http://www.infrastructurereportcard.org/
Edited by chinesekiwi - 6/6/13 at 11:27pm
post #78 of 89
Quote:
Originally Posted by chinesekiwi View Post

The Army Corp of Engineers rated US infrastructure a D- (and now a D+).
The infrastructure of the US, particularly in the older eastern states, has been significantly neglected and is hampering your economy immensely.
Without adequate infrastructure, no economy. Pure and simple. The cost upgrade infrastructure to adequate roading / transport standards like in Central and Western Europe (German civil engineering building techniques and transport logistics are absolutely world leading) or building structure standards like in earthquake-prone Japan and here in New Zealand (which we both have some of the strictest building codes in the world [and we bumped them up even more post Chch quake [see sig]. California's earthquake proof standards are significantly lower than both Japan's and New Zealand's) is MASSIVE for the US.
If you don't follow building standards and maintain them, people die. Pure and simple. Most, if not all of the deaths from my home city's quakes were either from old masonry falling on people or a building that shouldn't of past any sort of building inspection if it wasn't for corruption and total negligence.

Estimated cost: US $3.6 trillion dollars by 2020.

http://www.infrastructurereportcard.org/

My father in-law is a Crane Operator, the company he currently works for builds bridges and railroad trusses. Having spent some time working on our infrastructure he has a few things to say about how bad it is. He has photos of the underside of bridges all along the I-5 corridor, from Cali through Washington, that have large chunks of material missing because it has rotted out.

Something else he pointed out is that a lot of bridges here in the USA are NOT primarily rated for static loads, but rather loads in motion. While there is a static load rating that must be met, it is extremely low and really isn't worth anything. Not to mention the majority of these ratings were formulated ~50 years ago...

In short, we are screwed.
    
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post #79 of 89
Having known the history of American based logistics theory...hahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

1950-60s American transport logistics theory is a cruel joke and laughable today. The sad thing is most of your road infrastructure was built with those theories in mind at the time. German civil engineering building techniques and transport theory...AMAZING and ingenious.

German and Japanese civil engineering = thumb.gif

xxx-r346_res.jpg

That ain't by chance.
Edited by chinesekiwi - 6/6/13 at 11:38pm
post #80 of 89
Germany's population density is over five times the US's, and Japans is almost 10 times the US's.

They both have a fraction of the amount of roads as the US and a LOT more people to pay for them, mile for mile.

Just sayin'.

They both have the 'benefit' of having been largely redesigned and rebuilt following the war, too. While the doesn't excuse poor craftsmenship that may have been present in the 50s or whatever, newer infrastructure almost always has lower maintenance cost than older.

I walked past a bridge being inspected here just yesterday. They cleaned the paint off of large portions of a chain suspension bridge to do it, and a boomlift on a barge in the river.
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