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i5 3570k with Maximus V Formula overclocking

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hello Guys,

I have got an i5 3570k with a Maximus V Formula board. I am confused here because this board has so many options. I would like to overclock with my offset instead of having a fixed voltage. Mainly to 4.5Ghz and above but it looks like my chip wont do 4.5Ghz with low volts. It requires 1.34 volts for 4.5Ghz and this is with a fixed overclock. I want offset but I keep getting WHEA errors and the system becomes unstable which clearly indicates that the voltage is not sufficient.

Please can some one help me with this motherboard. What options should I Disable or Enable as this has got too many. I am totally confused here.
post #2 of 16
This thread will have everything you need.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1291703/ivy-bridge-overclocking-guide-asus-motherboards

Just take the time to read through it, open all the sections and screenshots. You will not know what your chips needs until you get all you bios settings correct. Any questions you can ask them in the thread.

The screen shots will look a little different than our bios, but the settings are the same. Be sure to flash to 1707 bios first though, if you are not on it.
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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanoldman View Post

This thread will have everything you need.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1291703/ivy-bridge-overclocking-guide-asus-motherboards

Just take the time to read through it, open all the sections and screenshots. You will not know what your chips needs until you get all you bios settings correct. Any questions you can ask them in the thread.

The screen shots will look a little different than our bios, but the settings are the same. Be sure to flash to 1707 bios first though, if you are not on it.

Hey thanks. I already have 1707 bios. But I was wondering, what would be the best for overclocking. Fixed voltage or Offset. For some reason, I found that having a fixed voltage was much stable and easier for me when compared to offset. Offset always gave me a bit higher voltage even with a negative offset and was still not stable due to WHEA Errors which was not the problem for me while using fixed.
post #4 of 16
If done correctly there should be no difference between offset and fixed vCore. Some mobos are not crazy about offset, but the MVF is not one of them. Once you follow the guide I linked your bios will be setup with manual (fixed) vCore. We recommend that you use manual vCore until you find the minimum voltage you need to stabilize your chosen multiplier.

Once you have done that you calculate your offset by using the formula Offset=Manual vCore – most common VID under load. The only time that doesn’t work out well is for people with unusually high VID and who are going for only a mild oc. In that case idle voltage may end up being too low with offset.

You mentioned that you might not have had all the bios settings optimized so I wouldn’t worry about what instabilities you had. I would just follow the guide and get stable with manual vCore, then the switch to offset voltage is relatively easy. Most people who follow the guide end up switching to offset at some point and don’t have trouble with it.
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Ivy 5.0
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Samsung 840 Pro 512GB Pioneer BD-RW Swiftech H220 Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit 
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post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanoldman View Post

If done correctly there should be no difference between offset and fixed vCore. Some mobos are not crazy about offset, but the MVF is not one of them. Once you follow the guide I linked your bios will be setup with manual (fixed) vCore. We recommend that you use manual vCore until you find the minimum voltage you need to stabilize your chosen multiplier.

Once you have done that you calculate your offset by using the formula Offset=Manual vCore – most common VID under load. The only time that doesn’t work out well is for people with unusually high VID and who are going for only a mild oc. In that case idle voltage may end up being too low with offset.

You mentioned that you might not have had all the bios settings optimized so I wouldn’t worry about what instabilities you had. I would just follow the guide and get stable with manual vCore, then the switch to offset voltage is relatively easy. Most people who follow the guide end up switching to offset at some point and don’t have trouble with it.

Thanks a bunch mate. One last question before you leave. I have heard that the CPU's lifespan increases when Offset voltage is used vs Manual. I would like to know that is that lifespan that people are talking about. 2 years or 3 years more? I know that I wont have to worry about that because anyways, I would be changing my setup when Skylake releases (probably in 2016) as Haswell and Broadwell won't be much of an upgrade for me. But still I would like to have that knowledge as well.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by irfanrafeeq88 View Post

Thanks a bunch mate. One last question before you leave. I have heard that the CPU's lifespan increases when Offset voltage is used vs Manual. I would like to know that is that lifespan that people are talking about. 2 years or 3 years more? I know that I wont have to worry about that because anyways, I would be changing my setup when Skylake releases (probably in 2016) as Haswell and Broadwell won't be much of an upgrade for me. But still I would like to have that knowledge as well.
The best I, or anyone else, can do for those questions is estimate. Normally a chip will last a long time, many more years than we would want to keep it. When we overclock we raise voltage and heat which increases electromigration (degradation of your chip).

Each new chip is different, so how long Sandy will last is not how long Ivy will last in the same situation. The pro benchers around here have commented that Ivy is a tough chip, it should last at least three years with any normal ocing.

Saying that offset voltage will make your chip last longer is more about saying that it will hold off measureable degradation longer. When a chip degrades it needs more voltage for the same oc, and eventually you may not be able to oc it all in the case of serious degradation. I have yet to read a case of any really measurable degradation with Ivy under average ocing conditions.

Now as to whether offset voltage actually holds off degradation more than manual voltage, that is a question for debate. I have seen very smart people argue for both sides of that, and since we have no hard evidence we don’t know for sure either way. Logically offset sends less voltage to the chip on average so it should be better, but others will argue the constant up and down of the voltage with offset is bad too. Based on what I have read I use offset, and recommend it, but that is just my opinion.

After that wall of text, basically short answer is, if you want it for 3-4 years don’t worry about it, you will be fine.
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post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanoldman View Post

The best I, or anyone else, can do for those questions is estimate. Normally a chip will last a long time, many more years than we would want to keep it. When we overclock we raise voltage and heat which increases electromigration (degradation of your chip).

Each new chip is different, so how long Sandy will last is not how long Ivy will last in the same situation. The pro benchers around here have commented that Ivy is a tough chip, it should last at least three years with any normal ocing.

Saying that offset voltage will make your chip last longer is more about saying that it will hold off measureable degradation longer. When a chip degrades it needs more voltage for the same oc, and eventually you may not be able to oc it all in the case of serious degradation. I have yet to read a case of any really measurable degradation with Ivy under average ocing conditions.

Now as to whether offset voltage actually holds off degradation more than manual voltage, that is a question for debate. I have seen very smart people argue for both sides of that, and since we have no hard evidence we don’t know for sure either way. Logically offset sends less voltage to the chip on average so it should be better, but others will argue the constant up and down of the voltage with offset is bad too. Based on what I have read I use offset, and recommend it, but that is just my opinion.

After that wall of text, basically short answer is, if you want it for 3-4 years don’t worry about it, you will be fine.


Allright. I followed the guide and I was able to achieve only 4.4Ghz with a fixed voltage of 1.288 (LLC on ultra high and CPU PLL 1.7v, CPU PLL Overvoltage enabled). Any lower voltage and my CPU gets unstable and I start getting WHEA errors. I also tried 4.5Ghz but unfortunately, that is not stable even at 1.35 volts which is actually too much for Ivy. I guess that I am unlucky and have a bad chip. Max temps on IBT are 78 degrees and Prime 95 temps are 72 degrees max. Its very unfortunate that I got an expensive board but a stupid CPU. I could have got 4.4Ghz even on a cheaper board. frown.gif

Anyways, will try Offset later after running more stability tests on fixed voltage as I want to be sure about the overclock.
post #8 of 16
If you have all the setting right from the guide (except your specific ram timings/voltage/speed which are specific to you) and have successfully run memtest86+ overnight to make sure the ram isn’t an issue, then you may just have a poor overclocker. My first chip needed 1.33v for 4.5, and I have seen people need more.

Most stores have a 15 or 30 day exchange policy, if you want to go to that much trouble. When you say 1.288 fixed, that is obviously what you see from software, but what did you type into bios for that? It shouldn’t take much more than another .060 to go from 4.4 to 4.5, so if it takes a lot more then I would question if you have a setting wrong somewhere or something else is wrong.

Have you rung Prime95 for an extended time with F5 defaults in bios, but the same ram settings you are using now? That tells us if there are problems unrelated to the chip oc.
Ivy 5.0
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i7-3770k 5.0 24/7 Maximus V Formula EVGA GTX 690 G.Skill Trident X 2400 (2x8gb) 
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Ivy 5.0
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i7-3770k 5.0 24/7 Maximus V Formula EVGA GTX 690 G.Skill Trident X 2400 (2x8gb) 
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Samsung 840 Pro 512GB Pioneer BD-RW Swiftech H220 Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit 
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2 x NEC 30" Logitech G15 Corsair AX1200 NZXT Switch 810 
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post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanoldman View Post

If you have all the setting right from the guide (except your specific ram timings/voltage/speed which are specific to you) and have successfully run memtest86+ overnight to make sure the ram isn’t an issue, then you may just have a poor overclocker. My first chip needed 1.33v for 4.5, and I have seen people need more.

Most stores have a 15 or 30 day exchange policy, if you want to go to that much trouble. When you say 1.288 fixed, that is obviously what you see from software, but what did you type into bios for that? It shouldn’t take much more than another .060 to go from 4.4 to 4.5, so if it takes a lot more then I would question if you have a setting wrong somewhere or something else is wrong.

Have you rung Prime95 for an extended time with F5 defaults in bios, but the same ram settings you are using now? That tells us if there are problems unrelated to the chip oc.

I have checked all the settings and they are correct. I just have a poor overclocker. I have it at offset voltages (Negative offset of 0.45). the voltage reported on windows is 1.288 volts. I cannot go any higher than this as 4.5 is not possible for me even at 1.35 volts.
post #10 of 16
Ivy is ok up to 1.5v and 95c, it is a pretty tough chip. Personally I don’t recommend going much over 1.4v for 24/7, and I like to keep my Prime95 temps closer to 80c if possible. Not sure where you got the 1.35v limit, I run 1.41v on both mine 24/7.
Ivy 5.0
(14 items)
 
Ivy 4.8
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770k 5.0 24/7 Maximus V Formula EVGA GTX 690 G.Skill Trident X 2400 (2x8gb) 
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Samsung 840 Pro 512GB Pioneer BD-RW Swiftech H220 Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit 
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2 x NEC 30" Logitech G15 Corsair AX1200 NZXT Switch 810 
MouseAudio
Logitech G9x Logitech G51 
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Ivy 5.0
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i7-3770k 5.0 24/7 Maximus V Formula EVGA GTX 690 G.Skill Trident X 2400 (2x8gb) 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 Pro 512GB Pioneer BD-RW Swiftech H220 Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit 
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2 x NEC 30" Logitech G15 Corsair AX1200 NZXT Switch 810 
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