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Xeon E3 V2 Ivy-Bridge or V3 Haswell

post #1 of 7
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Hi guys,

I was about to purchase a budget server build when lo-and-behold, Intel releases a new generation. The Ivy-Bridge Xeon I was looking at was the E3-1230V2 and the new Haswell counterpart is the aptly named E3-1230V3.

The price difference is $45.
The sockets are different. So different motherboard...
The TDP on the Ivy Bridge is lower at 69 watts compared to the new Haswell at 80 watts. (huh?)
Operating Frequency is the same.

Any thoughts on what I should do or which one I should get?

Thanks!

Edit: If this is in the wrong place/forum, direct me in the correct direction. I haven't been here in a while.
Edited by Takedown22 - 6/2/13 at 7:13pm
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System22
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post #2 of 7
The increased TDP is because part of the VRM moved from the board inside the CPU package with Haswell. The cooler needs to be able to dissipate more heat because of that.

On that note... is there something special to know about the E3-1230v3 (and higher) CPUs? Are there neat differences to normal i7? What about BCLK straps being locked at 100 MHz for non-k i5 and i7, for example: is this the same with the Haswell Xeons? I feel helpless answering this, Google Search can't find anything.
Edited by deepor - 6/2/13 at 7:24pm
post #3 of 7
The CPU doesn't have onboard graphics compared to normal i7. With the difference of $45, I wouldn't go for a Haswell simply because the improvement margin isn't big enough for me.
post #4 of 7
You can tweak the BCLK a little bit if you want to, 102-103 MHz, but I don't believe the 2-3% performance improvement you gain is worth the risk of instability with the PCie clocks being tied to the BCLK. I don't think there are BCLK straps (e.g. 125 MHz) on the Xeon E3 processors - maybe somebody with more experience can chime in on that.

The only tangible advantage of a Xeon over a i7 is the ability to run ECC memory, and if you're running a server 24x7, there is no way I'd do it without ECC memory. Solar flares, cosmic rays, whatever - bit flipping is a lot more common than people think, especially when you have large portions of RAM sitting idle for extended periods of time. ECC will scrub the RAM and correct single bit errors. Keep in mind ECC wasn't designed to address "bad" or "damaged" RAM - but sporadic bit flips that can be corrected with parity before they turn into data errors on the memory bus.

Greg
post #5 of 7
thats what ive been wondering too. since the E3s have no fsb (which i don t understand) and a locked multiplier, they cannot be Overclocked unless you do it by the BCLK from what ive read previously. However haswell brings back BCLK ocing, so does this mean Haswell Xeons can be overclocked?
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

On that note... is there something special to know about the E3-1230v3 (and higher) CPUs? Are there neat differences to normal i7? What about BCLK straps being locked at 100 MHz for non-k i5 and i7, for example: is this the same with the Haswell Xeons? I feel helpless answering this, Google Search can't find anything.

I recall some pre-launch rumors from Chinese sites that indicated that the multipliers and BCLK straps weren't adjustable in Haswell Xeons or Core i5/i7 non-K chips.

Hopefully some sites will do full-line reviews with non-K chips shortly. The likely reason that only K-line chips got the first reviews is that they're the chips most enthusiasts wanted info on, thus generating clicks/page impressions.
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Julia
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post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammong View Post

You can tweak the BCLK a little bit if you want to, 102-103 MHz, but I don't believe the 2-3% performance improvement you gain is worth the risk of instability with the PCie clocks being tied to the BCLK. I don't think there are BCLK straps (e.g. 125 MHz) on the Xeon E3 processors - maybe somebody with more experience can chime in on that.

The only tangible advantage of a Xeon over a i7 is the ability to run ECC memory, and if you're running a server 24x7, there is no way I'd do it without ECC memory. Solar flares, cosmic rays, whatever - bit flipping is a lot more common than people think, especially when you have large portions of RAM sitting idle for extended periods of time. ECC will scrub the RAM and correct single bit errors. Keep in mind ECC wasn't designed to address "bad" or "damaged" RAM - but sporadic bit flips that can be corrected with parity before they turn into data errors on the memory bus.

Greg

The Xeon chip is about $100 cheaper than its i7 competitor. Chances are, you'll need some kind of GPU to run the chip, so it's worth it to save some money and go with the Xeon. ECC isn't needed
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