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Deliding a 4770K (Haswell). Improving temperatures and maximizing overclockablity. - Page 21

post #201 of 1134
I'm pretty sure batches have no correlation to OC. Each wafer of silicon and batch should have a lot of variation in itself.
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post #202 of 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohhgourami View Post

I'm pretty sure batches have no correlation to OC. Each wafer of silicon and batch should have a lot of variation in itself.

Batches can often give a good indication for the general overclock even with the variations between and in wafers.
post #203 of 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by SSTGohanX View Post

I would say this "proves" that there is no point to change from Sandy or Ivy simply over the fact that the stable top-overclocks are roughly the same as the stable/top overclocks for 2600k/2700k/3770k. At the same time though, it's still a fairly new chip.

What kind of cooling are you using?

Is 5.1 Sandy and 4.8 Ivy and 4.5 haswell really realistic to say top clocks? I've seen many ivy on the super stable club around 4.5 and not so many sandy over 4.8 ghz to be fair.

Considering also that the Asus guy said 70% could hit 4.5 on haswell with over 580 cpu tested.
post #204 of 1134
It would be nice to have a data collection thread though with batch #'s voltages and clocks.
 
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post #205 of 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Storm View Post

It would be nice to have a data collection thread though with batch #'s voltages and clocks.


There is one, just not much action in it.

 

http://www.overclock.net/t/1397657/plz-post-your-haswell-temps-speed-and-chip-batch/0_30

post #206 of 1134
Does anyone know if Haswell is outputting more heat than Ivy Bridge or if the heat is just harder to dissipate? I've been wondering this for a while now. If you put your hand on a cooler running a 4770k, is it warmer than one running a 3770k at the same settings?
post #207 of 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Vanelay View Post

Does anyone know if Haswell is outputting more heat than Ivy Bridge or if the heat is just harder to dissipate? I've been wondering this for a while now. If you put your hand on a cooler running a 4770k, is it warmer than one running a 3770k at the same settings?

I wouldn't go with 'putting your hand on the cooler' philosophy, but the answer to your question is both.

Ivy ran hot due to increased transistor density (22nm, tri-gate) and a bad TIM used by Intel.

Haswell runs a bit hotter than Ivy bridge with the reasons of Ivy Bridge itself and also the heat produced but the new built-in FIVR or basically the internal voltage regulators, moved from the mobo onto the chip.
post #208 of 1134
^^

Sandy and Ivy have the same thermal profile. i.e. at the same wattage of power dissipated, they'll be at the same temperatures. Ivy, being more efficient on an architectural and structural level doesn't need the same amount of power to do the same work as Sandy. Hence, cooler. However this doesn't take into account the fact that Ivy die is smaller than Sandy die, increasing the thermal density and making it harder to get the heat off it.

Haswell is hotter than Ivy using this same number (at same wattage, Haswell will be hotter). But it's probably canceled out by Haswell being more efficient than Ivy. Haswell then integrates the voltage regulator which dumps probably 10W under the IHS, thus making Haswell as a package hotter than Ivy.
Quote:
Also, the FIVR is NOT the same thing as the Voltage Regulator

You realize FIVR stands for fully integrated voltage regulator right? It regulates 1.7V down to 1.2 or whatever the core voltage is, and does the regulation for the uncore.
Edited by dr/owned - 6/9/13 at 2:32am
post #209 of 1134
Can anyone suggest a good place to buy the liquid ultra / pro from?
Prefferably somewhere that accepts paypal and can express ship to Australia smile.gif
post #210 of 1134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belial View Post

Also, the FIVR is NOT the same thing as the Voltage Regulator. I can assure you, if you try to run 12 volts straight from the power supply to the FIVR of Haswell, you'll have a pile of ash in no time. The FIVR merely helps finetune the translated 12v to ~1.3v (or whatever you set your vcore to) to a much more refined 1.3v. The FIVR ideally is to help reduce power consumption as well, as the more precise FIVR can help finetune the ~1.3v better for the CPU than the VRM on the motherboard. The FIVR is the scalpel to the hacksaw of the VRM, so while the CPU unit itself consumes more power, the system as a whole consumes less.

Actually the FIVR takes the Vccin and regulates that into 5 other voltages - Vcore, VCCIOA, VCCIOD, VCCSA, and Vring.  So it very much is a voltage regulator, it just isn't the only voltage regulator.  But all the motherboard is supplying to the chip is Vccin and Vddq (DDR).

 

Here's a nice picture of it:

 

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