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learning C++ - Page 2

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

To be fair, did many languages even support parameterized calls a decade ago?

No, but they have since then.... legacy design patterns were continued for a decade.
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post #12 of 17
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Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

No, but they have since then.... legacy design patterns were continued for a decade.

Well it's not really "continued for a decade" if such patterns were the only option a decade ago. tongue.gif Back then it would have been the right way to go about things.

I do agree with your point though - that the code should have been updated before now. I just think you're being a bit unfair to your colleagues saying it's a "decade" of bad practice
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

Well it's not really "continued for a decade" if such patterns were the only option a decade ago. tongue.gif Back then it would have been the right way to go about things.

I do agree with your point though - that the code should have been updated before now. I just think you're being a bit unfair to your colleagues saying it's a "decade" of bad practice

It was just a minor example.... there a whole bunch of development flaws. smile.gif
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post #14 of 17
Well, I'm in the same boat as you. What I would do is plan a semester with only 12 credits with one of them being C++. I hate programming but in my major (EE) at this school it is a requirement to learn to code in C++. I would go to lecture, get some ideas, mark in my textbook those ideas, then try to get it to work. Usually it doesn't.

However, at my school we have a Linux lab with lab assistants who can be summoned for quick questions when I run into a wall or get lost in my own (not great) logic. This is my 3rd programming class and so I've had some time getting to know a few people who like to program. That helps a lot, so I think you're right to get close to people who like to program. Really you just need someone to help you walk through your own logic.

Programming seems to me like starting your own business. You can have some pretty awesome ideas, but when the feet hit pavement, you have no idea how to actually do what you wanted to. So the real gem comes from using your own problem solving skills to come up with a way to complete the assignments. When you don't know how to do what you want to do, look for help. It's gotten me through a lot. And I've probably read the book a couple of times? But then again, I'm more trial and error, and when in error, consult the instructions biggrin.gif

Anyways, it has become very enjoyable since it is you who is coming up with the solutions to these problems. It feels good. Still hate it though. Good luck with whatever you do
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by supamas View Post

Well, I'm in the same boat as you. What I would do is plan a semester with only 12 credits with one of them being C++. I hate programming but in my major (EE) at this school it is a requirement to learn to code in C++. I would go to lecture, get some ideas, mark in my textbook those ideas, then try to get it to work. Usually it doesn't.

However, at my school we have a Linux lab with lab assistants who can be summoned for quick questions when I run into a wall or get lost in my own (not great) logic. This is my 3rd programming class and so I've had some time getting to know a few people who like to program. That helps a lot, so I think you're right to get close to people who like to program. Really you just need someone to help you walk through your own logic.

Programming seems to me like starting your own business. You can have some pretty awesome ideas, but when the feet hit pavement, you have no idea how to actually do what you wanted to. So the real gem comes from using your own problem solving skills to come up with a way to complete the assignments. When you don't know how to do what you want to do, look for help. It's gotten me through a lot. And I've probably read the book a couple of times? But then again, I'm more trial and error, and when in error, consult the instructions biggrin.gif

Anyways, it has become very enjoyable since it is you who is coming up with the solutions to these problems. It feels good. Still hate it though. Good luck with whatever you do


Better learn to love programming. EE is nothing but math (well, the good playing EE jobs). That math is done almost entirely matlab or python programs with C for the tight loops.

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by hajile View Post


Better learn to love programming. EE is nothing but math (well, the good playing EE jobs). That math is done almost entirely matlab or python programs with C for the tight loops.

Yeah and I understand that. When I started imbedded systems I realized how much I need to love programming smile.gif
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by hajile View Post

Better learn to love programming. EE is nothing but math (well, the good playing EE jobs). That math is done almost entirely matlab or python programs with C for the tight loops.

It's interesting that you say that. In my IT division at work, there are a lot of people who don't have much interest in computers outside of their day job. It's like most other professions in that regard - the people do the job simply for a source of income. Sometimes it's a job/profession they enjoy, sometimes not. However, I seldom meet a fellow programmer who doesn't have a passion for coding, often going home in the evening from their day job only to plop down in front of their PC to work on some side project or another - often just for the fun of it.
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