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lan on motherboard

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I've seen some motherboards, which have 2 lan ports. why?
post #2 of 15
You can connect them to two separate networks simultaneously for load balancing and reliability purposes.

If one network goes down, and the other is still up, you'll still be operational.

Alternatively, you can use it to directly link 2 computers using a crossover cable, while still having both networked to the internet.

Sometimes that's done with 10 gigabit Ethernet when the second box is loaded with storage
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
but obviously you can't put them in raid like storage drives or in sli/crossfire like graphics cards to almost double performance right?
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alessio View Post

but obviously you can't put them in raid like storage drives or in sli/crossfire like graphics cards to almost double performance right?
Correct. Crossing over two systems increases file transfer speeds by bypassing the network, but that is the only performance increase you will experience.
post #5 of 15
Uh you totally can link them using link aggregation to get nearly double performance

I do that at work, all the time. You're giving false information
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelus359 View Post

Uh you totally can link them using link aggregation to get nearly double performance

I do that at work, all the time. You're giving false information

I've tried that a few years ago, got 2.0 GPS connection but the actual thoughput was still capped at 117 mb's a second 1 way, but i was able to get 117 to go both ways at the same time, just not double that one way, are you saying you can get it to go double the same way at once?
post #7 of 15
Sure you can

You just need to have both the destination and the sender being 2 gigabit, you need to have a switch that can handle link aggregation protocol, you need to configure link aggregation protocol, and also configure the local machine to use link aggregation protocol

If you don't do all of the above, your box will do 2 gigabit outgoing, and 1 gigabit incoming, but the recipient will not be able to get 2 gigabit incoming, and will be stuck at 1


The non link aggregation protocol method works okay if you are mostly sending outgoing to multiple clients

The link aggregation method is good all the time, but will not exceed 1 gigabit unless both ends of the pipe exceed 1 gigabit
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angelus359 View Post

Sure you can

You just need to have both the destination and the sender being 2 gigabit, you need to have a switch that can handle link aggregation protocol, you need to configure link aggregation protocol, and also configure the local machine to use link aggregation protocol

If you don't do all of the above, your box will do 2 gigabit outgoing, and 1 gigabit incoming, but the recipient will not be able to get 2 gigabit incoming, and will be stuck at 1


The non link aggregation protocol method works okay if you are mostly sending outgoing to multiple clients

The link aggregation method is good all the time, but will not exceed 1 gigabit unless both ends of the pipe exceed 1 gigabit

What i did, bought 4 intel NICs cable of link agg and a 8 port managed switch, both pc's had drives that could read / write about 350 to 450 avg speed for solid files. What configuration are you speaking of that i may of missed for the protocol, i may revisit this project if you speak the truth.

Example of results when i did it

PC A to B transfer rate was 117 megs,

PC B to A was same 117 megs one way copying.

I could also get copying PC A to B and B to A at the same time both doing 117 but one way it was only 117 but total it was filled, but i wanted it also for one way to have the double speed. Hope it detailed this enough, let me know sir!

Edit: both PC's did read 2 GPS on the NIC info under network connections.
Edited by ACleverName - 9/30/16 at 12:26pm
post #9 of 15
It's not something that you just plug all the stuff in, and it just works.

You have to configure it properly, or you're limited to 1 gigabit incoming.
post #10 of 15
https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/privatecloud/2012/06/19/nic-teaming-in-windows-server-2012-brings-simple-affordable-traffic-reliability-and-load-balancing-to-your-cloud-workloads/

In switch independent mode, you have 2 gigabit outgoing and 1 gigabit incoming
In switch dependent mode, you have 2 gigabit outgoing and 2 gigabit incoming

The switch needs to be manually configured (unless you use software defined networking) to use LACP (IEEE 802.1ax Link Aggregation Control Protocol) to create a aggregated connection to allow switch dependent mode to work.
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