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Will later Batches of 4770k be more stable than early Batches of 4770k?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Have you noticed historically any changes in stability as time passes by for the same model, or what they do they do?

Then again, I had suspected nerds in stockhouses flocking around 4770ks testing them out and discarding the 'bad' ones for the masses:P
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post #2 of 6
Newer steppings usually improve stability. I haven't seen huge improvements except in the nahalem days when they went from C0 to D0.
post #3 of 6
ES Haswell chips overclock better than retail ones. So there won't necessarily be a huge improvement.
post #4 of 6
There's a D0 stepping on the way as I speak (might take months to hit shelves), which would indicate a major silicon revision. With every stepping there's a laundry list of stuff that gets fixed. Some stuff is interesting like for example integrated graphics glitching under certain conditions. Other stuff is boring like some logic registers getting stuck at 1 if you send a certain sequence of instructions.

Will it improve overclocking? Maybe yes, maybe no. Ivy Bridge has had serious improvement recently because the fab site was moved from Fab 32 to D1D, it seems.
Edited by dr/owned - 6/26/13 at 9:28am
post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr/owned View Post

There's a D0 stepping on the way as I speak (might take months to hit shelves), which would indicate a major silicon revision. With every stepping there's a laundry list of stuff that gets fixed.
That's very interesting to hear. Do you know of a reliable source informing us of such steppings on the way? Or do we just look at stores etc.?
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post #6 of 6
So far as I know, outside of someone leaking slides or whatever, there's no way to know which steppings are coming. Even D0 might be an internal-only stepping that never goes public if fixing one bug creates another or there's a .1% yield hit or the stars don't align right smile.gif. I think there's a document published that's handed out to OEMs to lay these things out, since mobo manufactures need to know about new steppings and microcode updates to make sure BIOSes are good to go.
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