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[FAX]- What do the numbers in your modem statistics means?

post #1 of 2
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Hi guys I don't know if this a good place to post this but I just piled up some information about modem statistics and I thought it would be best to share with you guys. thumb.gif

What do the numbers in my modem statistics mean and are my stats good?
A: Most modems and routers have the ability to monitor line statistics. Some modems have very detailed monitoring while others may only show basic information.

Although what is monitored and the exact name may be different depending on manufacturer, the overall information is the same. Below are some of the common terms and measurements used to judge line quality. Remember these are not hard numbers but simply a generalization of line statistics:

Attainable Line Rate (AKA Synch Rate)
This is the maximum rate at which your modem can connect to the DSLAM if there was no service provisioning limiting the bandwidth. Anything over 2,000Kbps is considered good. The higher the number the better.

Used Line Rate
Your Used ATM Rate (actual service rate) plus bandwidth to cover the overhead and provisioning of the service.

DSL Rate
Your provisioned ATM Rate (actual service rate) plus bandwidth to cover the overhead and provisioning of the service.

Relative Capacity (AKA Line Capacity)
Percentage of your overall available bandwidth used to obtain your service ATM rate. For example; if your max line synch rate was 5888Kbps and you were provisioned on a 1472Kbps service you would be using 25% capacity. 1472/5888=25% capacity. The lower the relative capacity the better, but you can still get maximum speeds (although a less stable connection) even with a very high relative capacity. In other words you could be synching at 1472Kbps with 98% relative capacity and achieve maximum speeds, but you may experience more disconnects.

SNR Margin (AKA Signal to Noise Margin or Signal to Noise Ratio)
Relative strength of the DSL signal to Noise ratio. 6dB is the lowest dB manufactures specify for modem to be able to synch. In some instances interleaving* can help raise the noise margin to an acceptable level. The higher the number the better for this measurement.
> 6dB or below is bad and will experience no synch or intermittent synch problems
> 7dB-10dB is fair but does not leave much room for variances in conditions
> 11dB-20dB is good with no synch problems
> 20dB-28dB is excellent
> 29dB or above is outstanding

Line Attenuation
Measure of how much the signal has degraded between the DSLAM and the modem. Maximum signal loss recommendation is usually about 60dB. The lower the dB the better for this measurement.
> 20dB and below is outstanding
> 20dB-30dB is excellent
> 30dB-40dB is very good
> 40dB-50dB is good
> 50dB-60dB is poor and may experience connectivity issues
> 60dB or above is bad and will experience connectivity issues

Output or TX Power
How much power modem (upstream) or DSLAM (downstream) is using. Maximum recommended is about 15dB. The lower the power the better for this measurement.

CRC Errors (Cyclic Redundancy Check)
CRC is a method of detecting errors in data transmission. A high CRC count in inself is not really cause for alarm. However, any increase in CRCs after your initial connection is established is a problem and usually points to a physical issue somewhere.

Thanks for looking. I hope it would be useful for at least some of you. biggrin.gif
post #2 of 2
Pretty neat information man!
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Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Network Hardware › [FAX]- What do the numbers in your modem statistics means?