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MCP355 PWM Control Evidence. Proof needed. - Page 2

post #11 of 14
Help me out here, as I'm now confused as to what worked and did not work, and for who.


It's not at all uncommon for one basic PCB to be shared by several devices, whether it's GPU's or pumps, or televisions etc.

The difference of course is in which components are installed and made active.

It's most cost effective to have a fairly basic PCB that can be configured in multiple ways by component and jumper selections.

The PWM 35X version of the DDC pump has to have additional components to effect PWM control versus it's non-PWM siblings.

It would not make financial sense to have the extra parts on all the PCBs in each model, and then just enable them with an extra wire connected for the 35X model.

Far more likely to have the same basic PCB for all the DDCs, with exactly the components required to produce each particular model's specs.

As far as running a DDC at reduced voltage, as from a fan controller, there's predictably going to be a voltage range where it works OK, but below which it does not.

The motor control electronics in the pump have to have some minimum thresh hold voltage for them to function, that once you dip below, the pump just stops.


From some testing I've done and seen from others, voltage based speed control for pumps is fairly limited to the upper third of the max speed voltage, nominally 8V to 12V.

For most pumps, that puts your speed control range in roughly the 3000 to 4500 rpm range.


If you need slower speeds, you need to go to PWM control to make that happen.

I've looked at making a PWM power source that actually outputs a full 12V capable of running multiple pumps, but the fail is that you'd still need the onboard control circuitry on the pump to be live all the time, not pulsed, so it would still require modification to the pump's PCB at the least . . . meaning it couldn't be a "plug n play" controller, making it not very useful to most folks.


Darlene
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by IT Diva View Post

Help me out here, as I'm now confused as to what worked and did not work, and for who.


It's not at all uncommon for one basic PCB to be shared by several devices, whether it's GPU's or pumps, or televisions etc.

The difference of course is in which components are installed and made active.

It's most cost effective to have a fairly basic PCB that can be configured in multiple ways by component and jumper selections.

The PWM 35X version of the DDC pump has to have additional components to effect PWM control versus it's non-PWM siblings.

It would not make financial sense to have the extra parts on all the PCBs in each model, and then just enable them with an extra wire connected for the 35X model.

Far more likely to have the same basic PCB for all the DDCs, with exactly the components required to produce each particular model's specs.

As far as running a DDC at reduced voltage, as from a fan controller, there's predictably going to be a voltage range where it works OK, but below which it does not.

The motor control electronics in the pump have to have some minimum thresh hold voltage for them to function, that once you dip below, the pump just stops.


From some testing I've done and seen from others, voltage based speed control for pumps is fairly limited to the upper third of the max speed voltage, nominally 8V to 12V.

For most pumps, that puts your speed control range in roughly the 3000 to 4500 rpm range.


If you need slower speeds, you need to go to PWM control to make that happen.

I've looked at making a PWM power source that actually outputs a full 12V capable of running multiple pumps, but the fail is that you'd still need the onboard control circuitry on the pump to be live all the time, not pulsed, so it would still require modification to the pump's PCB at the least . . . meaning it couldn't be a "plug n play" controller, making it not very useful to most folks.


Darlene

you are right about every line you wrote above. as I was taking with lowfat, he did make work one of his pcb with a extra wire for the PWM but the thing is when you look the back of the pcb all looks the same but different manufacturer, maybe? dunno!. lowfat pcb is a koolance brand and mine is swiftech and koolance makes they wont pump but i don't know if is the same manufactory. Laing company makes the swiftech pump. I did tried to make it work but i fail. because my pcb may be missing a PWM controller like you mentioned above. Me and Martinm210 had the same conclusion too missing parts. the only way to configure a pump to a low speed is to have a pump speed control mentioned in my last post.
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Black Hawk
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post #13 of 14
There are two different pcb boards, one for the 10 watt pump, another for the 18 watt pump.

The 18 watt pump pcb comes without the pwm wire soldered to the board and it is possible that adding a wire to the contact spot will give you pwm. Modding the 10 watt board is not possible.

Buy this...

http://www.diyinhk.com/shop/home/11-laing-ddc-pump-18w-repair-pcb-wled-smd-soldered-mcp355.html

...and search on youtube how to swap boards, martin has done it btw, he has a review blog on his site about it, he probably just forgot lol.

Further readinghttp://www.overclock.net/t/912130/laing-ddc-pump-repair-pcb-mod/30#post_18342756

As an aside, if you lke the mcp355s and want another cheap, buy a board or two from diyink, and then contact this guy http://www.overclock.net/u/60060/bmaverick and see if the has any faulty pumps (pumps with fried boards) for sale. Total cost is about half for a new pwm pump lol
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NimbleJack View Post

There are two different pcb boards, one for the 10 watt pump, another for the 18 watt pump.

The 18 watt pump pcb comes without the pwm wire soldered to the board and it is possible that adding a wire to the contact spot will give you pwm. Modding the 10 watt board is not possible.

Buy this...

http://www.diyinhk.com/shop/home/11-laing-ddc-pump-18w-repair-pcb-wled-smd-soldered-mcp355.html

...and search on youtube how to swap boards, martin has done it btw, he has a review blog on his site about it, he probably just forgot lol.

Further readinghttp://www.overclock.net/t/912130/laing-ddc-pump-repair-pcb-mod/30#post_18342756

As an aside, if you lke the mcp355s and want another cheap, buy a board or two from diyink, and then contact this guy http://www.overclock.net/u/60060/bmaverick and see if the has any faulty pumps (pumps with fried boards) for sale. Total cost is about half for a new pwm pump lol

so getting this PCB it gives you the PWM to control pump speed than ? soldering and extending wires it not a problem for me thumb.gif
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Black Hawk
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
4770k - 13 B 666 Asus Maximus VI Formula 1080 SeaHawk EK | K|NGP|N  G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB 
Hard DriveCoolingCoolingCooling
SAMSUNG 830 128GB raiD 0 rx 360 rx240 rx240 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
Ek-Res X3 250mm Swiftech MCP35X2 COUGAR CF-V12HPB Vortex Lamptron FC9 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
Bitspower compression fittings koolance CPU 370 Windows 10 Pro Acer XB271HU ‑ 27" 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Quick fire TK EVGA 1300g2 Corsair 800D MoDeD G502 
Mouse PadAudioOtherOther
Rosewill REACT XL Creative Sound Blaster Z Sennheiser HD 555  AKG K267 
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M-Audio BX5a 
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