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2.5" or 3.5"?!! - Page 2

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thank you Jamar,
From everything I've read, the 2 1/2 inch and 3 1/2 inch SSD's apparently use their own housings as a heat sink. But then, if you go into the ones that cost $800 or more, I'm sure they probably use something more sophisticated.
Thanks again, Rich
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

It's solid state electronics... smaller is better.

It's not that a 2.5" SSD would save space... it would be that a 3.5" would be WASTING space.

Even in the 2.5" form factor, many SSDs are bigger than they need to be. A 128GB SSD can easily take up 1/5 the volume of the 2.5" form factor.

There is no heat issue.... SSDs utilize less power (so less heat) and they can tolerate much higher temperatures. Being hot is not an issue..... being at your thermal limit is. These are two different things.

Sorry, but solid-state electronics have one major flaw; the smaller they get the hotter they get and that equals a loss of transfer speed and much more. Solid-state electronics in concept is definitely good but the quality of the solid state's components is what plays the most important part. When you buy a 250 GB SSD for two hundred dollars, I can assure you, you're not getting the same thing you're getting when you buy a 250 GB SSD that costs $800.

Anyway, the point is that smaller is not better always. It has to do a lot with how you make it smaller and in today's economy the low-priced "smaller things" are not going to last or perform as well as many of the bigger predecessors of that same device from years ago.
Rich
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingclip View Post

Sorry, but solid-state electronics have one major flaw; the smaller they get the hotter they get and that equals a loss of transfer speed and much more. Solid-state electronics in concept is definitely good but the quality of the solid state's components is what plays the most important part. When you buy a 250 GB SSD for two hundred dollars, I can assure you, you're not getting the same thing you're getting when you buy a 250 GB SSD that costs $800.

Anyway, the point is that smaller is not better always. It has to do a lot with how you make it smaller and in today's economy the low-priced "smaller things" are not going to last or perform as well as many of the bigger predecessors of that same device from years ago.
Rich
....

The heat is so negligible being produced by the chips in an SSD enclosure that it doesn't even remotely need directed airflow unlike common HDDs. There is absolutely no problem regarding heat and solid state drives.

And SSDs have longer lifespan than an HDD.

An HDD is in two states, Dying or dead.

An SSD is in three states, working just fine, or unable to write, or corrupted.

An SSD is infinitely more reliable in terms of storage and long term storage than a mechanical HDD. And yes, smaller is damn near better in this case. That low priced small Samsung 840 is going to outlast those mechanical HDDs in terms of lifespan.


And your analogy with pricing differences of the same capacity is just flat out inane. Same stuff with HDDs. Except an $800 price point will give you maybe another 10 years in total writes + a PCIe SSD versus a $150 price point would give you an SSD that will last 10-15 years before being unable to be written to, and maybe not as fast as it'll be bottlenecked at SATAIII.


Please stop giving wrong information to the OP.
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingclip View Post

Sorry, but solid-state electronics have one major flaw; the smaller they get the hotter they get and that equals a loss of transfer speed and much more. Solid-state electronics in concept is definitely good but the quality of the solid state's components is what plays the most important part. When you buy a 250 GB SSD for two hundred dollars, I can assure you, you're not getting the same thing you're getting when you buy a 250 GB SSD that costs $800.

Anyway, the point is that smaller is not better always. It has to do a lot with how you make it smaller and in today's economy the low-priced "smaller things" are not going to last or perform as well as many of the bigger predecessors of that same device from years ago.
Rich

With the controllers, smaller is better.


As far as the NAND/PCB goes, smaller is cheaper. The cheaper NAND is, the more you can use, and more NAND gives you more endurance, performance, and storage.

Sure, an SLC drive is essentially "bigger", faster, and will last a heck of alot longer than an MLC one of the same size. But it'll be obsolete in a few years anyway... paying more for better/less dense NAND chips doesn't make much sense.
Edited by brucethemoose - 7/10/13 at 2:13pm
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Bruce
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post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingclip View Post

Thank you Jamar,
Although I didn't do anything "wrong". I don't know why you've never seen a 3.5" SSD because they are out there I can assure you, (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227928&Tpk=OCZ%203.5%22%20120GB%20SSD&IsVirtualParent=1).

The OCZ 120 GB I put in my wife's computer is a 3.5" SSD, (that's how it's labeled on the box).

Having been around long time, and I can say that "smaller is not better" in all cases. The advantages to bigger has a lot to do with heat and wear. I won't bore you with all the examples of the past electrical and mechanical devices that have shrunk and then, as a result, lost their fidelity performance, but they're out there.wink.gif

But I'm just pointing that out because many people do think that the smaller the component the better. It's just not that way on all points and when it comes to HDD's/SSD's, I have to guess that the 3.5" SSD's being sold would offer less temperature issues.

On the other hand, I do appreciate your opinion that either will work in a desktop configuration. As I said earlier in another post, I know that they both will work but I wanted to know what most people would use in their desktops given choice.

In your case, it's obvious that you would use the 2 1/2 inch SSD to save on space, and in fact, your answer indicates to me that this is really all about personal preference. Once again, it would seem that the 3.5" would be the better choice if you're concerned about dissipating heat as opposed to saving room.

So I get it, you're saying this is all about opinion and preference and that does answer my question. I had suspected ass much but I've never seen any posts addressing that particular point.thumb.gif

Thank you as well Destrto!
Thank you, Rich
PS I'll hit your REP+ smile.gif

I am sure others must have already answered this question but there are very, very few 3.5" ssds on the market today. There is no reason to go 3.5" over 2.5" and many reasons to go with the 2.5". There is NO reliability difference between the form factors, most SSDs don't get hot enough and if heat were an issue 2.5" would actually be better, as they could use the case to transfer heat.
If you open up a 3.5" SSD (I have at the IT shop I work at) you will find they use a 2.5" pcb anyway. There may be some that don't but the ones I have had experience are just the 2.5" ssd pcb in a 3.5" shell.

So just buy a 2.5" SSD and use an adapter to mount it. Many retail kits come with these adapters. You'll have more choice.
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post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingclip View Post

Sorry, but solid-state electronics have one major flaw; the smaller they get the hotter they get and that equals a loss of transfer speed and much more. Solid-state electronics in concept is definitely good but the quality of the solid state's components is what plays the most important part. When you buy a 250 GB SSD for two hundred dollars, I can assure you, you're not getting the same thing you're getting when you buy a 250 GB SSD that costs $800.

Anyway, the point is that smaller is not better always. It has to do a lot with how you make it smaller and in today's economy the low-priced "smaller things" are not going to last or perform as well as many of the bigger predecessors of that same device from years ago.
Rich

As solid-state technology gets smaller... their leakage increase BUT the total energy consumed and loss lowers. Don't think so? Go tell every single chip maker to stop process shrinks and that the last 50 years of semi-conductors is wrong. There are growing pains with each process shrink but once it matures, it is always better.

I know exactly why SSD costs how much they cost.... I've order $100 SSDs and have also ordered $6000 SSDs for work.

What you think... isn't quite right. Basically, the NAND is the same but there is binning involved for the tighter voltage bands. SLC is not really used for servers anymore due to cost. Everyone is moving to eMLC (aka HET MLC).

You are wrong. Smaller is virtually always better with semiconductors.


You need to go back and examine your assumptions... because they are inaccurate. The history of electronics, white papers, and spec sheets prove it.
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post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by wingclip View Post

Thank you Jamar,
From everything I've read, the 2 1/2 inch and 3 1/2 inch SSD's apparently use their own housings as a heat sink. But then, if you go into the ones that cost $800 or more, I'm sure they probably use something more sophisticated.
Thanks again, Rich

Actually, most do not. If they do, it would be for the controller and maybe the DRAM. Generally, NAND do not.


If you look at high-end SSDs, that don't at all. This one has a heatsink on the controller but the NAND are exposed. NAND do not use much power since they non-volatile storage.

This is a $6000 365GB MLC SSD... the heatsink is on the controller.
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post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckieHo View Post

Actually, most do not. If they do, it would be for the controller and maybe the DRAM. Generally, NAND do not.


If you look at high-end SSDs, that don't at all. This one has a heatsink on the controller but the NAND are exposed. NAND do not use much power since they non-volatile storage.

This is a $6000 365GB MLC SSD... the heatsink is on the controller.

+1! I was about to address this issue, but you've gotten to it quicker. Good job!
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