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astrophotograpy critique and questions - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jixr View Post

well this weekend i'm going out to a buddies lake house, packing all my gear up.

What types of lens's are reccomended for these types of shots?

as far as my short length len's, I have a ( canon ) kit lens 18-55, 40mm and 50mm prime
As well as an 8mm fisheye.

Since I don't have much opportunity to test and play, traditionally, what settings do you want to use?

the wider the lens the better. like the other person said you need a pretty wide lens as well as a fast one. from what ive been reading f/2.8 seems to be the butter zone for sharpness and depending on focal length exposure is usually anywhere from 10-30 seconds unless you have a motorized mount or want star trails.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ljason8eg View Post

Normally, you'll want something wide and fast. The 24L II seems very popular, but its not that wide on a crop body and is very expensive.

f/2.8 zooms can work well at their widest focal length. I've posted a shot below which was taken with a 7D and 17-55 f/2.8 at the following settings: f/2.8, 20 seconds, ISO 3200. It probably would have been better at ISO 6400, but the noise would have been really bad because of the dark sky. Likewise I could have lengthened the exposure to 25 or 30 seconds, but then the stars start to form trails.

Your 40mm or 50mm could work, because they're fast. The problem is, since they are a narrower FOV then say, 17mm, star trails start to form at shorter exposure times than they do if a wider focal length is used.

7783803244_1e4617f6dc_b.jpg
IMG_6123.jpg by JLofing, on Flickr

how did you manage to get that nebula effect in there? (the clouded stars). do you actually have to point at constellations in your local sky or is there just specific settings you use?

last time i tried (the two photos in the original post) i was just randomly shooting at the sky in different directions, but i havent gotten any of those nebulae. then again i was using my slow 18-55 at f/4.5
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by abduct View Post

how did you manage to get that nebula effect in there? (the clouded stars). do you actually have to point at constellations in your local sky or is there just specific settings you use?

last time i tried (the two photos in the original post) i was just randomly shooting at the sky in different directions, but i havent gotten any of those nebulae. then again i was using my slow 18-55 at f/4.5

That's just the Milky Way. If the sky is mostly free from light pollution, you should be able to faintly see it with the naked eye. If there's too much light pollution it might not show up in your photo at all no matter what settings you use.
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post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ljason8eg View Post

That's just the Milky Way. If the sky is mostly free from light pollution, you should be able to faintly see it with the naked eye. If there's too much light pollution it might not show up in your photo at all no matter what settings you use.

ah. i've never seen it, maybe my eyes are just bad. im a good 2 hours away from any city up between two mountains so i dont think there would but much if any light pollution. i will need to see if i can spot it next time i go up. going to bring my phone with me with googles sky map and see if i can photograph anything that way.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by abduct View Post

ah. i've never seen it, maybe my eyes are just bad. im a good 2 hours away from any city up between two mountains so i dont think there would but much if any light pollution. i will need to see if i can spot it next time i go up. going to bring my phone with me with googles sky map and see if i can photograph anything that way.

Good idea on the sky map, but your view will be determined by where you live due to the rotation of the earth and such.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jixr View Post

Good idea on the sky map, but your view will be determined by where you live due to the rotation of the earth and such.

yea this is also true. also with being pinned between two large mountains i cannot actually take pictures of the horizon because of being surrounded by mountains which may also be a factor.
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