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Forming a strict airtunnel without losing airflow...

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hello,

im thinking about how to create an airtunnel. Its not a standard design, it will be some pcbs with heatsinks that are built into a 19" server rack. Each pcb will have a 36mm high aluminium heatsink. So i plan to take 2 of these pcb's and put the heatsinks together, so that both heatsinks are connected with the ribbons. One pcb lets the heatsink show to the top, the other let the heatsink show bottom and then connect them stacked. It would be 2 pcbs then with "1" heatsink in between that is 72mm high then. I hope everyone can imagine how i mean it.

Now i want that a fan is throwing air through the ribbons, but i want to form an airtunnel that forces all the air through the heatsink ribbons. For that i need a material that is static and dynamic enough to form such a tunnel. Of course it should not be able to create shortcuts too. And i need a way to fasten it. Im not sure if i could use glue tape simply.

The idea ist to form a tunnel from the fan to the heatsinks and from the heatsinks to another fan. Most probably some more pcbs will be in a line at the end before the other fan comes into game. I want that all the airflow created fromt he fan is going through the heatsinks. Otherwise most of the air would go the easier way and wouldnt help cooling.

What material could i use for the tunnel and for fastening the tunnel?

Thanks!
Sebastian
post #2 of 6
If you are putting this into a rack, you should just buy the right product in the first place instead of doing cooling experiments. If you can't fit what you need because of rack space, move your units around or buy another rack.

Your cooling experiment is dangerous and shouldn't be done. If you really want to make it work, then guy a lot of electrical tape and wrap those two PCB's together. Then get the most badass 80mm fan you can find. Probably still won't cool well enough.
post #3 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1kke View Post

If you are putting this into a rack, you should just buy the right product in the first place instead of doing cooling experiments. If you can't fit what you need because of rack space, move your units around or buy another rack.

Your cooling experiment is dangerous and shouldn't be done. If you really want to make it work, then guy a lot of electrical tape and wrap those two PCB's together. Then get the most badass 80mm fan you can find. Probably still won't cool well enough.
Agreed. Rack cooling has been done to death to find the most efficient way, and these products exist on the market already.
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3770K Asus Sabertooth Z77 EVGA GTX Titan SC 16GB G.SKILL Sniper Gaming Series 
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Gran Turing(0)
(14 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7 3770K Asus Sabertooth Z77 EVGA GTX Titan SC 16GB G.SKILL Sniper Gaming Series 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
WD Blue 1TB WD Blue 640GB LG 22X DVD±R DVD Burner Noctua NH-D14 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 3x Samsung Syncmaster S23A300B 1920x1080 LED IBM Model M Zalman ZM850-HP 
CaseMouse
Antec Twelve Hundred V1 Logitech G5 
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post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Can you tell me what solutions you mean? I cant believe that something exists that would match exactly my needs. But maybe im wrong.
But i guess you only mean special fans. Thats fine but i dont want that the air goes the easiest way, which for the most part isnt the heatsink. Its easier for the air to go around it. Thats why i thought about forcing the air into the best way. I might be wrong but i think throwing half of the air through places that doesnt have to be cooled or instead force the same volume through a heatsink will have a significant effect. But im not a pro in this area for sure.

Electrical tape ok... but what material for the tunnel itself? I mean there is a gap between the heatsink and the fan. I would like to close it. Some material that i can form and that is static enough to stay in place and endure the airpressure.
post #5 of 6
I make air ducts with file folders. biggrin.gif Cut and fold glue with glue-stick.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1041926/how-to-decide-on-a-case-for-air-cooling-warning-pics/1860_20

TELVM uses foam core from hobby shop.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1041926/how-to-decide-on-a-case-for-air-cooling-warning-pics/1860_20#post_20267144

Cardboard tubes from TP, paper towels, etc. are often handy for small fans
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

I make air ducts with file folders. biggrin.gif Cut and fold glue with glue-stick.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1041926/how-to-decide-on-a-case-for-air-cooling-warning-pics/1860_20

TELVM uses foam core from hobby shop.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1041926/how-to-decide-on-a-case-for-air-cooling-warning-pics/1860_20#post_20267144

Cardboard tubes from TP, paper towels, etc. are often handy for small fans

Sounds interesting. Thanks for the tip...
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