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480W Logisys PSU - Cheapo, but how bad is it? (with pics)

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
This power supply came with a cheap-o mid-tower case I ordered a year or two ago. The 480 watt rating seemed appropriate for the new build, but when I received it, I had second thoughts. The thing hardly weighs more than a book of stamps, and looking through the air vents reveals the thinnest heatsinks I've ever seen on the inside of a power supply.

My impression was that the manufacturer put far more time and expense into the black glossy finish than anything else. I suspect the components used on the inside are the absolute cheapest they could get their hands on, yielding a unit that is capable of only a fraction of its rated power.

Fast forward to today, and I'm rebuilding an older Socket 478 Prescott system, and have this PSU in mind for it. If it works for six months, then blows up and takes all the other hardware with it, I wouldn't really be out anything, other than a pile of old hardware that has little or no value.

I decided to open the unit up, as the warranty is long expired; based on the pictures below, is there anything that can be ascertained regarding power supply manufacturer, realistic output power, design type, quality of components used, etc? How would this PSU rate from worst to best? Any input, info, suggestions, and such would be greatly appreciated!


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post #2 of 5
Stay away from those PSU's they're bad joo joo. They spike often and fry components easily.
post #3 of 5
lol


Pretty bad. That one's hammer-worthy. I recommend a 4lb sledge.

That 13007 FET sure does get around though. I think 90% of the sub-$20 PSUs on the market are using it, at least.



I like that they drilled ten billion holes in it for the PFC parts. Normally you only need 2 to 4.
Edited by Phaedrus2129 - 7/14/13 at 7:19pm
post #4 of 5
I like it even more that all of those holes appear empty and there isn't even a PFC in there haha.
There's also very little to no filtering stage, only 1 proper coil, cheapass caps, and so on.. haha
Thundahcat.
(20 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Athlon XP-M Barton @ 2612Mhz ASUS A7N8X-X HIS Radeon X800XL 256MB w/ V-MOD @ 585Mhz GPU 5... 3x512MB Samsung PC-3200 CL3 
Hard DriveCoolingOSOS
Maxtor 80GB IDE Cooler Master alu/copper block with a Slipstrea... Windows 98 SE Windows XP Pro SP3 
PowerCase
Cooler Master Real Power M520W OEM with great airflow and even cable management 
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Thundahcat.
(20 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
AMD Athlon XP-M Barton @ 2612Mhz ASUS A7N8X-X HIS Radeon X800XL 256MB w/ V-MOD @ 585Mhz GPU 5... 3x512MB Samsung PC-3200 CL3 
Hard DriveCoolingOSOS
Maxtor 80GB IDE Cooler Master alu/copper block with a Slipstrea... Windows 98 SE Windows XP Pro SP3 
PowerCase
Cooler Master Real Power M520W OEM with great airflow and even cable management 
  hide details  
Reply
post #5 of 5
1. Apparently there's no line filter (EMI/RFI filter), virtually making the PSU illegal to sell in the developed world (no US FCC approval listed, although it's often faked), unless there's a passive power factor correction (PFC) coil not visible in the photos. Place an AM radio near the PSU and tune to a weak station. If turning on the PSU drowns out the station with a whine or hiss, then the line filter is missing.

2. Both peak power (480W) and average power (330W) are listed. High quality PC PSUs never list a peak power rating.

3. The donut coils next to the heatsink look kind of small. They filter the output voltages and get hot (some PSUs stick a temperature sensor there to regulate fan speed), and generally smaller means hotter for a given power level.

4. I don't see any smaller coils on the outputs. They're typically short rods with thick wire wound on them, perhaps covered with heatshrink. Maybe they're not needed.

5. The heatsinks look kind of small for a 330W PSU or even a 250W one. However high efficiency PSUs can get by with smaller heatsinks, not that this PSU is high efficiency.

6. Transformer size matters, and generally a bigger transformer can handle more power.

4294061544_659e6778dc_o.jpg

The photo above was taken by someone who decided to improve his 480W Logisys. The blue transformer on the right is the replacement, taken from a Topower/Aspire, is rated for just 500W, while the yellow one on the left is the original. The yellow transformer seems to like something found in high quality 200-250W PSUs. You may want to read the messages in this thread about such modifications (must register to see photos):

http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=7193&highlight=logisys+575w+aspire&page=5
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