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What is the coolest running @ at the same time, most powerful card you can get right now - Page 4

post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masta Squidge View Post

It's been tested to death. There is no reason why you have to exhaust hot air at the top.

In fact, the server case at work, and all of our press' electrical cabinets have exhaust fans at the bottom with intakes at the top.

There is literally nothing to consider when it comes to the whole heat rising thing. It is so trivial that you don't need to waste a thought on it. You do not have to design around this whatsoever. The only thing you need to worry about with cooling any type of cabinet or case is whether or not you have airflow where you need it and the path is free from in to out, while passing over/through the components that need cooling.

No, it isn't wrong about the general statements. But in some cases it works much better to run things in reverse.

For that matter, being worried about turbulent air is worthless too. A rookie isn't going to be testing things down to .1C accuracy. They will likely never know the difference between the fans the case came with, and swapping them for better ones in a different place.

As long as you have hot air out and cold air in, even the crappiest setup will function just fine for the average user. That is why Dells get away with 1 80mm fan front and back and nobody ever complains about their temps.

I have a doubt. IF heat rises, and it does, and in a closed room air temperature is hotter near the ceiling than near the floor, why would you use hotter air to cool your components, by taking air from above rather than below?? as we know, air cooling will cool electrical components up to air temperature, so if the air you use to cool them is already hot, it won't do so much good.
Servers are quite tall, if the room hasn't got high enough ceiling, it could lead to unnecesary overheating, am I right?
post #32 of 36
Thread Starter 
i dunno if theres tensity here
dont worry set your case up the way you like
i bet its better than alot of people lol smile.gif
post #33 of 36
You are right, most servers do indeed have the intakes at the bottom for that reason. We have 20 foot high ceilings and the whole building is air conditioned. Ours doesn't have a bottom intake though. And our electrical cabinets are not tall enough for that to make a difference anyways.

Neither is your PC case. Considering the difference in temps from 0" to 24" above the floor (or desk, or whatever) are nearly immeasurable, it too isn't worth bothering with.

If you have your PC in an enclosed ish space with the front and back open, (like most computer desks when shoved against a wall) it might be better to have a rear intake and exhaust out the front.

Of course, if you have a hot GPU dumping air back there, obviously that is a bad thing. But some people run nothing more than integrated. Having a rear intake and front exhaust would be better - even if the intake is at the top and exhaust at the bottom. Why? Because there is much less buildup of heat behind the PC.

If you have a hot GPU in the same situation though, you need to account for that as well.


The only point I am making is that it just doesn't matter in a desktop case. You are better off designing for airflow, not designing around whether or not heat rises - with exceptions being having take into account the surrounding environment.
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post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masta Squidge View Post

You are right, most servers do indeed have the intakes at the bottom for that reason. We have 20 foot high ceilings and the whole building is air conditioned. Ours doesn't have a bottom intake though. And our electrical cabinets are not tall enough for that to make a difference anyways.

Neither is your PC case. Considering the difference in temps from 0" to 24" above the floor (or desk, or whatever) are nearly immeasurable, it too isn't worth bothering with.

If you have your PC in an enclosed ish space with the front and back open, (like most computer desks when shoved against a wall) it might be better to have a rear intake and exhaust out the front.

Of course, if you have a hot GPU dumping air back there, obviously that is a bad thing. But some people run nothing more than integrated. Having a rear intake and front exhaust would be better - even if the intake is at the top and exhaust at the bottom. Why? Because there is much less buildup of heat behind the PC.

If you have a hot GPU in the same situation though, you need to account for that as well.


The only point I am making is that it just doesn't matter in a desktop case. You are better off designing for airflow, not designing around whether or not heat rises - with exceptions being having take into account the surrounding environment.


That explanation was enlightening.
And I agree with you.

To the guys above who though there is/was tension here, there isn't. We are just to grown men discussing about air flow/cooling. It is good to find other people who know about things more than you do so as to learn from them.
And I have to admit that I am stubborn as hell and always want to have an accurate explanation before giving in wink.gif
post #35 of 36
Go for the better card and OC the hell out of it. You could try doing the fan mod I have in my sig which can lower temps quite a bit too. Very cheap option.

If you really must run a card under 60C, you need aftermarket like a Prolimatech MK-26. An MK-26 blows all the other air coolers away in both noise and temperatures. The Accelero Hybrid barely edges it out by 1-2 degrees but runs much much louder.
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post #36 of 36
Gtx 770 All the way.
Running mine at 1.3ghz over clocked stable at 65 degrees with fans on 100%! Best cooling ive seen yet on a card! Performs great too smile.gif
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