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Can I manually change my RAM multiplier?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
So, from what I understand the bclk is used as a base clock (hence "bclk") for just about everything's operating frequency. There are also multipliers that boost the base clock to some other frequency. So, if I have a bclk of 100MHz and I want to run my CPU at 4.3GHz then I change my CPU multiplier to 43 because 43*100MHz = 4.3GHz. That all makes sense to me.

Here is where I'm not positive. I'm pretty sure the RAM works the same way with a typical multiplier of 8. So does that mean that with a bclk of 100MHz and a RAM multiplier of 8 I can run my ram at a max of 100MHz*8*2= 1600MHz? (the 2 is for double data rate (DDR)). This would explain why intel says the max RAM speed most of their CPUs supports is 1600MHz.

Now, to take this a bit further, I overclocked my RAM to 2133MHZ at 12,12,12,24 timings by selecting 2133MHz from a RAM speed dropdown menu in my bios and manually changing the timings. I also had to boos the RAM voltage from 1.5V to 1.6V to get it stable. At the top of my bios it says the target speed for the RAM is 2133MHz and when I boot my computer and check in CPU-Z I also see that my RAM speed is 1066MHz (which multiplies out to 2133MHz).

So based on those numbers from CPU-Z I'm assuming my bios automatically changed the RAM multiplier to allow me to hit 2133MHz? Or am I not REALLY running at 2133MHz until I boost my bclk to 133MHz? (133*8*2 = 2133).

OR, can I manually change the multiplier so I can keep to bclk the same?

I hope that all makes sense!
post #2 of 8
Thread Starter 
No one? How about this... First person to respond with an answer gets +1 REP. thumb.gif
post #3 of 8
What is your system specs. You should be able to run what ever memory speed you choose in the BIOS as long as your CPU and memory are able to hit those speeds. And yes, the memory is always running at the speed you choose regardless of your base clock. I believe the memory speed is a multiplier of your base clock. So you have the speeds listed in the bios of 1600,1866,2133. If you want something in between those you have to choose one, say 2133, increase your bclck and the memory speed will increase from 2133.
Ananke
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Ananke
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post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
i7-3930k (4.3GHz OC)
Asus P9X79 Pro Mobo
16GB (4x4GB) 1600MHz CL8 Corsair Vengeance RAM

I thought the multiplier was fixed to 8x on RAM? I do have the selection for 1600, 1866, 2133, 2400, etc. So maybe the mobo changes the multiplier to get those speeds? I just want to make sure I'm actually getting 2133MHz instead of the mobo just saying that's what it's set to. Is there any way to test that or would programs like CPU-Z just ask the mobo what the timings are?

PS, hilarious pic. How far did the cat fall?
post #5 of 8
I don't think that is how it works, I'm no expert though. Maybe someone smarter than me can explain it better. I do know if you look at at CPU-Z or Mem TweakIt it will show you what your FSB to DRAM ratio is. I wouldn't worry about the speed, you will be getting the speed it says. You can check the differences between speeds in a benchmark program like AIDA64. That picture I found at some GIF website. I was laughing for like 5 minutes so I put it as my avatar.
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Ananke
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post #6 of 8
Memory speed is determined by base clock multiplied with the memory divider. With DDR3, a 1:1 divider results in 1600 MHz, however the divider can be altered and that's what you so when ocerclocking. The divider is like the RAM's "multiplier"
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crust_cheese View Post

Memory speed is determined by base clock multiplied with the memory divider. With DDR3, a 1:1 divider results in 1600 MHz, however the divider can be altered and that's what you so when ocerclocking. The divider is like the RAM's "multiplier"

So when I select 2133MHz from the drop down menu I'm actually changing the ratio? Can I change the ratio manually? And what exactly is being divided? I know it's not the bclk. I guess I'm just not sure what this ratio is that your talking about.
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkrReign2049 View Post

...You can check the differences between speeds in a benchmark program like AIDA64. That picture I found at some GIF website. I was laughing for like 5 minutes so I put it as my avatar.

That's not a bad idea. I'll have to run some of those tests when I get home. And yeah, I watched the gif for a few minutes when I first saw it as your avatar haha.
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