Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Haswell Overclocking Guide [With Statistics]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Haswell Overclocking Guide [With Statistics] - Page 82

post #811 of 19539
Quote:
Originally Posted by BangBangPlay View Post

I do the same, just some people ask us to take their word on their settings and other take the time to post proof of their OCs. I know that tweaking will always change settings, I just have a hard time believing that everyone is reporting HWs fluctuating Vcore value for their OCs.

I say fluctuating because that is what it does even while in Manual mode. While in Adaptive VID fluctuates, but it remains static in Manual like it should. I think HWmonitor and HWinfo are reporting the wrong value for the core on Haswell. LLC doesn't effect the offset according to a few tests I ran, and that offset doesn't change if the BIOS voltage is altered slightly. In other words when I drop my voltage from 1.285v to 1.280v it still reports 1.296V while stressing. I am still skeptical that this value represents how much voltage is being used by the cores. Why does it fluctuate in Manual voltage mode and it also reports 0.000v while sitting at desktop in HWinfo while at idle? I know the CPU can enter low voltage states while sleeping, but it can't run on no voltage. Either the value is off or it is just wrong.

Does your board have voltage measurement points on it? That would be the easiest way to find out, even if it isn't 100% accurate it should still show whether it bumps up under load like the software says.

I've never seen 0.00V myself, I think the lowest I've ever seen is 0.060V - in C7 sleep the voltage to pretty much the entire core is cut off, so it could be 0V, depending on where the voltage was measured. Of course different boards could be showing different behavior also.

Here's the 0.060V mine shows after about an hour sitting on the desktop (although I'd rather have 0V than 0 BCLK, stupid GTL):

Edited by Forceman - 8/17/13 at 6:39pm
post #812 of 19539
Mine sits at 0.000V until it enters turbo state (some stress test or benchmark) and then it displays a varying + offset of my VID. I updated my Sager laptop's BIOS to a custom BIOS that allows for extra options, memory tweaking, and dGPU over voltage and iGPU overclocking. I raised the iGPUs turbo frequency 100 MHz and then was trying to set the voltage offset. Interestingly enough I noticed that HWinfo64 doesn't use Vcore to display CPU or iGPU core voltages, it used VID. I know that laptops are much more simplified, but I still find it relevant. My laptop has an i7 3630QM so it is Ivy, but HWinfo used VID for the core values none the less.

I suspect that this value will vary from MB to MB and might be wrong. That is why I advocate using BIOS entered voltage and not this offset until we determine exactly what it is and how it is controlled. Maybe Intel could shed some light on this voltage. I always understood that manual voltage with most processors will set a cap at which the CPU can operate.
Sager NP6350
(9 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7-3630QM Clevo W350ETQ Nvidia GTX 660M 12 GB Samsung DDR3 1600 MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
Crucial M4 256 GB WD Black 750 GB Toshiba DVD-RW Drive Windows 7 (64 bit) 
Monitor
LG Phillips 
  hide details  
Reply
Sager NP6350
(9 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7-3630QM Clevo W350ETQ Nvidia GTX 660M 12 GB Samsung DDR3 1600 MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
Crucial M4 256 GB WD Black 750 GB Toshiba DVD-RW Drive Windows 7 (64 bit) 
Monitor
LG Phillips 
  hide details  
Reply
post #813 of 19539
Quote:
Originally Posted by BangBangPlay View Post

I always understood that manual voltage with most processors will set a cap at which the CPU can operate.

That wasn't really the case in the past. There was always that "vdroop" business going on. When load was higher, the vdroop was also higher. The idea behind vdroop was to give the VRM more time to react after load stops. When load stops, power consumption stops, and voltage will shoot up. The vdroop was intended to keep that in check. It's more vdroop with more load because the higher load will mean a higher spike in voltage at the point when load stops.

The boards with better VRM have that LLC stuff where you can control how vdroop works. You can reduce vdroop or completely remove it. That works because the spikes are smaller on the better boards as the VRM is working at a higher speed and reacting faster. Still, if you left LLC on default, you'd get the vdroop as defined in Intel's specifications, and that would mean a massive vdroop at load.

In practice, this means you set something like fixed 1.32v in the BIOS on a Z77 board with LLC on default, and if you start up prime95, you'll see 1.28v. This makes the BIOS setting a bit worthless, the HWMonitor reading more important. [Note: that's just an example pulled out of my butt and not actually tested so the numbers are not real.]
post #814 of 19539
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

That wasn't really the case in the past. There was always that "vdroop" business going on. When load was higher, the vdroop was also higher. The idea behind vdroop was to give the VRM more time to react after load stops. When load stops, power consumption stops, and voltage will shoot up. The vdroop was intended to keep that in check. It's more vdroop with more load because the higher load will mean a higher spike in voltage at the point when load stops.

The boards with better VRM have that LLC stuff where you can control how vdroop works. You can reduce vdroop or completely remove it. That works because the spikes are smaller on the better boards as the VRM is working at a higher speed and reacting faster. Still, if you left LLC on default, you'd get the vdroop as defined in Intel's specifications, and that would mean a massive vdroop at load.

In practice, this means you set something like fixed 1.32v in the BIOS on a Z77 board with LLC on default, and if you start up prime95, you'll see 1.28v. This makes the BIOS setting a bit worthless, the HWMonitor reading more important. [Note: that's just an example pulled out of my butt and not actually tested so the numbers are not real.]

When writing that last post I imagined that someone would mention this, but it still doesn't explain the offset extra voltage that appears with Manual or Adaptive voltage. I only have experience overclocking Haswell CPUs as I have had laptop CPUs that were locked in the past. So I really mean to focus on Haswell more than previous generations. What I meant by "I understood" was that Haswell was only supposed to draw extra voltage while in Adaptive voltage mode running AVX instruction sets. We were told that manual voltage would give us a static voltage, and now that is not the case? I sort of understand Vdroop and the function of LLC to offset it, but that shouldn't apply to this generation.

I am just having a hard time believing that Haswell all of the sudden does draw extra voltage, and all because of some third party software. Volt meter or no volt meter you can only measure the voltage on the motherboard and not inside the processor where the FIVR lies. It is likely that this Vcore value is indeed being reported wrong because of the new design. LLC does nothing to change this value, and on my motherboard it doesn't behave like core voltage should. The VID value on the other hand does. I am going to make some inquiries with Asus and maybe Intel if I can on their respective forums to see if I can get some answers about this phantom voltage value.
Edited by BangBangPlay - 8/17/13 at 8:27pm
Sager NP6350
(9 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7-3630QM Clevo W350ETQ Nvidia GTX 660M 12 GB Samsung DDR3 1600 MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
Crucial M4 256 GB WD Black 750 GB Toshiba DVD-RW Drive Windows 7 (64 bit) 
Monitor
LG Phillips 
  hide details  
Reply
Sager NP6350
(9 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7-3630QM Clevo W350ETQ Nvidia GTX 660M 12 GB Samsung DDR3 1600 MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
Crucial M4 256 GB WD Black 750 GB Toshiba DVD-RW Drive Windows 7 (64 bit) 
Monitor
LG Phillips 
  hide details  
Reply
post #815 of 19539
You've always been able to get boards to deliver extra voltage under load by using excessively high settings for LLC (called Vrise). So Haswell isn't the first chip that's ever had higher load voltages than what was set. It's possible that the FIVR has an aggressive LLC control, or that the chip requests extra voltage during heavy loads, even when in manual mode. That's the way it works in adaptive, so maybe there is some carryover to manual mode as well. In any case, 0.01V of extra voltage isn't a very big deal.

And the boards must have some way of getting Vcore off the chip, or there wouldn't be much point in having measurement points for it. Should be easy enough to check the pin-out of the CPU and see if there is a pin that reports Vcore back - should be on the datasheet. I'd check it but I'm on my phone.
post #816 of 19539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkwizzie View Post

Seems like my crash was indeed either ring bus or ram related.
what crash? that stop error 0x09 (machine check exception)? that's ring bus. you need more volts.
post #817 of 19539
Thread Starter 

It doesn't display 0.0v for me idle on desktop on all c states and adaptive. o.o What do we use then, for measuring voltage? Bios settings can be deceptive when yuo have adaptive on while stressing, you can simply drop the voltage and set adaptive and it'll pass prime on a "low voltage".

 

Anusha, I got 9c Bsod after letting the computer go as I sleep, doing chess.

I've set vcore down to x38 from x41 without lowering voltage and I've set a whopping 1.44v for 4.6ghz up from 1.385v to make sure it's not a vcore issue... Vring at 1.9v. Ram at 1600 instead of 1866 xmp.

 

Last night I did 5 minutes per side, ran engines against each other, no Bsod all night. Did 15 minutes per side, Bsod in 7 games.

*scraches head* drunken.gif


Edited by Darkwizzie - 8/17/13 at 9:40pm
Undelwalt (2017)
(29 items)
 
 
Celapaleis (2013)
(16 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
7600k @ 5.197/1.392 1.392v z170 Asus Hero EVGA 1080ti SC Black (2100/6250) x2 8gb GSkill Trident Z 3600 @ 3804 15-15-15-32-2T 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Samsung 950 Pro 512gb (Undelwalt) WD Red 2tb (Pack Yak II) Seagate Expansion Drive 5tb (Phoenix Down II) 3x560mm HardwareLabs Nemesis GTX 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
XPSC Raystorm Pro Watercool Heatkiller 1080ti Full Cover Waterblock EK XTOP Revo Dual D5 (Serial, PWM, v4) EK ZMT (1/2 - 3/4 ID OD) 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
14xEK ACF (Compression Fittings) EK x4 250 (v2) Distilled Water + PT Nuke (Copper Sulphate) 24x140mm Silent Wings 3 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 Pro 64bit Catleap 27 Inch 2560x1440 IPS 60hz Display Coolermaster Storm Trigger (Brown Switches) EVGA P2 1000w 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
Corsair Air 540 Logitech G Pro Tek Syndicate "Raze the World" Desk Mat O2 + Odac by Mayflower Electronics (Rev A) 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Sennheiser HD 800 2xKrk Rokit 6 G2 Blue Yeti (Grey) Rode PSA-1 Arm 
Other
Aquaero 6 LT + Aluminum Heatsink 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 6600k Delid @ 4.848/4.848 Asus z170 Hero MSI GTX 980ti @ 1499/4082 1.25v/134% Power 2 x 8gb Gskills Ripjaws V 3131 16-16-16-32 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung Pro Series 840 256gb (Celapaleis) 1 TB Samsung Drive (Pack Yak) Samsung Pro Series 850 256gb (Celapaleis Reprise) Phoenix Down (External Backup) 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
Noctua D14 Kraken x61 Push-Pull for GPU Windows 10 Pro Catleap 2560x1440 @ 60hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
CM Storm Trigger Brown Switches EVGA Supernova 1000w P2 Corsair 540 Air Razer Abyssus 
Mouse PadAudioAudioAudio
Steelseries QcK Mini Blue Yeti Microphone Objective Dac + Amp Sescom AB Switch 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Krk Rokit 6 G2 x2 Radioshack Ground Loop Isolator (For Rokits) Wooaudio Aluminum Headphone Stand Sennheiser HD 800 
AudioOther
Logitech c920 Webcam NZXT Sentry Mix 2 Fan Controller 
  hide details  
Reply
Undelwalt (2017)
(29 items)
 
 
Celapaleis (2013)
(16 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
7600k @ 5.197/1.392 1.392v z170 Asus Hero EVGA 1080ti SC Black (2100/6250) x2 8gb GSkill Trident Z 3600 @ 3804 15-15-15-32-2T 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Samsung 950 Pro 512gb (Undelwalt) WD Red 2tb (Pack Yak II) Seagate Expansion Drive 5tb (Phoenix Down II) 3x560mm HardwareLabs Nemesis GTX 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
XPSC Raystorm Pro Watercool Heatkiller 1080ti Full Cover Waterblock EK XTOP Revo Dual D5 (Serial, PWM, v4) EK ZMT (1/2 - 3/4 ID OD) 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
14xEK ACF (Compression Fittings) EK x4 250 (v2) Distilled Water + PT Nuke (Copper Sulphate) 24x140mm Silent Wings 3 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 Pro 64bit Catleap 27 Inch 2560x1440 IPS 60hz Display Coolermaster Storm Trigger (Brown Switches) EVGA P2 1000w 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
Corsair Air 540 Logitech G Pro Tek Syndicate "Raze the World" Desk Mat O2 + Odac by Mayflower Electronics (Rev A) 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Sennheiser HD 800 2xKrk Rokit 6 G2 Blue Yeti (Grey) Rode PSA-1 Arm 
Other
Aquaero 6 LT + Aluminum Heatsink 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 6600k Delid @ 4.848/4.848 Asus z170 Hero MSI GTX 980ti @ 1499/4082 1.25v/134% Power 2 x 8gb Gskills Ripjaws V 3131 16-16-16-32 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung Pro Series 840 256gb (Celapaleis) 1 TB Samsung Drive (Pack Yak) Samsung Pro Series 850 256gb (Celapaleis Reprise) Phoenix Down (External Backup) 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
Noctua D14 Kraken x61 Push-Pull for GPU Windows 10 Pro Catleap 2560x1440 @ 60hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
CM Storm Trigger Brown Switches EVGA Supernova 1000w P2 Corsair 540 Air Razer Abyssus 
Mouse PadAudioAudioAudio
Steelseries QcK Mini Blue Yeti Microphone Objective Dac + Amp Sescom AB Switch 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Krk Rokit 6 G2 x2 Radioshack Ground Loop Isolator (For Rokits) Wooaudio Aluminum Headphone Stand Sennheiser HD 800 
AudioOther
Logitech c920 Webcam NZXT Sentry Mix 2 Fan Controller 
  hide details  
Reply
post #818 of 19539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forceman View Post

You've always been able to get boards to deliver extra voltage under load by using excessively high settings for LLC (called Vrise). So Haswell isn't the first chip that's ever had higher load voltages than what was set. It's possible that the FIVR has an aggressive LLC control, or that the chip requests extra voltage during heavy loads, even when in manual mode. That's the way it works in adaptive, so maybe there is some carryover to manual mode as well. In any case, 0.01V of extra voltage isn't a very big deal.

And the boards must have some way of getting Vcore off the chip, or there wouldn't be much point in having measurement points for it. Should be easy enough to check the pin-out of the CPU and see if there is a pin that reports Vcore back - should be on the datasheet. I'd check it but I'm on my phone.

I understand the concept but LLC doesn't work for Haswell and besides I haves mine set to Level 1 or the lowest possible setting. I do it for that particular reason. Haswell is unprecedented in its design and I am just weary of trusting 3rd party software that seems to all have a different reading. I was just reading an article about ASRock MBs not having an accurate VCore reading and that it was displaying CPU input voltage instead. It's just that every manufacturer calls each value something different so it is undoubtedly difficult for programs to label these different readings. It is troubling that a major manufacturer can't get its motherboards to display accurate Vcore readings. I am just skeptical because Aida64, CPUz, HWinfo64, and HWMonitor all display slightly different values for the cores. I just instinctually trust the manual value that I set in BIOS first.

There could be some sort of manual LLC as you stated earlier, maybe for added stability, but haveI never heard anything about it from Asus or Intel to date. I did notice that Vcore is displayed as a motherboard reading along with all of the other rails, and not in the CPU tree. This leads me to believe that it is reading voltage from the MB voltage regulator and not necessarily from directly inside the CPU. Maybe I am wrong, I am just skeptical until I see something more concrete (or a uniform reading for example).
Sager NP6350
(9 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7-3630QM Clevo W350ETQ Nvidia GTX 660M 12 GB Samsung DDR3 1600 MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
Crucial M4 256 GB WD Black 750 GB Toshiba DVD-RW Drive Windows 7 (64 bit) 
Monitor
LG Phillips 
  hide details  
Reply
Sager NP6350
(9 items)
 
   
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7-3630QM Clevo W350ETQ Nvidia GTX 660M 12 GB Samsung DDR3 1600 MHz 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveOS
Crucial M4 256 GB WD Black 750 GB Toshiba DVD-RW Drive Windows 7 (64 bit) 
Monitor
LG Phillips 
  hide details  
Reply
post #819 of 19539
Sup guys, does anyone know why my 4770k's temps go up 7-10c when I raise my rams speed above 1600mhz?
post #820 of 19539
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BangBangPlay View Post


I understand the concept but LLC doesn't work for Haswell and besides I haves mine set to Level 1 or the lowest possible setting. I do it for that particular reason. Haswell is unprecedented in its design and I am just weary of trusting 3rd party software that seems to all have a different reading. I was just reading an article about ASRock MBs not having an accurate VCore reading and that it was displaying CPU input voltage instead. It's just that every manufacturer calls each value something different so it is undoubtedly difficult for programs to label these different readings. It is troubling that a major manufacturer can't get its motherboards to display accurate Vcore readings. I am just skeptical because Aida64, CPUz, HWinfo64, and HWMonitor all display slightly different values for the cores. I just instinctually trust the manual value that I set in BIOS first.

There could be some sort of manual LLC as you stated earlier, maybe for added stability, but haveI never heard anything about it from Asus or Intel to date. I did notice that Vcore is displayed as a motherboard reading along with all of the other rails, and not in the CPU tree. This leads me to believe that it is reading voltage from the MB voltage regulator and not necessarily from directly inside the CPU. Maybe I am wrong, I am just skeptical until I see something more concrete (or a uniform reading for example).

Will a dude with a voltage meter be able to prove anything? If we're left without Hwmonitor or info and a person can cheat through adaptive while stressing, then what do we rely on?

Undelwalt (2017)
(29 items)
 
 
Celapaleis (2013)
(16 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
7600k @ 5.197/1.392 1.392v z170 Asus Hero EVGA 1080ti SC Black (2100/6250) x2 8gb GSkill Trident Z 3600 @ 3804 15-15-15-32-2T 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Samsung 950 Pro 512gb (Undelwalt) WD Red 2tb (Pack Yak II) Seagate Expansion Drive 5tb (Phoenix Down II) 3x560mm HardwareLabs Nemesis GTX 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
XPSC Raystorm Pro Watercool Heatkiller 1080ti Full Cover Waterblock EK XTOP Revo Dual D5 (Serial, PWM, v4) EK ZMT (1/2 - 3/4 ID OD) 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
14xEK ACF (Compression Fittings) EK x4 250 (v2) Distilled Water + PT Nuke (Copper Sulphate) 24x140mm Silent Wings 3 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 Pro 64bit Catleap 27 Inch 2560x1440 IPS 60hz Display Coolermaster Storm Trigger (Brown Switches) EVGA P2 1000w 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
Corsair Air 540 Logitech G Pro Tek Syndicate "Raze the World" Desk Mat O2 + Odac by Mayflower Electronics (Rev A) 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Sennheiser HD 800 2xKrk Rokit 6 G2 Blue Yeti (Grey) Rode PSA-1 Arm 
Other
Aquaero 6 LT + Aluminum Heatsink 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 6600k Delid @ 4.848/4.848 Asus z170 Hero MSI GTX 980ti @ 1499/4082 1.25v/134% Power 2 x 8gb Gskills Ripjaws V 3131 16-16-16-32 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung Pro Series 840 256gb (Celapaleis) 1 TB Samsung Drive (Pack Yak) Samsung Pro Series 850 256gb (Celapaleis Reprise) Phoenix Down (External Backup) 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
Noctua D14 Kraken x61 Push-Pull for GPU Windows 10 Pro Catleap 2560x1440 @ 60hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
CM Storm Trigger Brown Switches EVGA Supernova 1000w P2 Corsair 540 Air Razer Abyssus 
Mouse PadAudioAudioAudio
Steelseries QcK Mini Blue Yeti Microphone Objective Dac + Amp Sescom AB Switch 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Krk Rokit 6 G2 x2 Radioshack Ground Loop Isolator (For Rokits) Wooaudio Aluminum Headphone Stand Sennheiser HD 800 
AudioOther
Logitech c920 Webcam NZXT Sentry Mix 2 Fan Controller 
  hide details  
Reply
Undelwalt (2017)
(29 items)
 
 
Celapaleis (2013)
(16 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
7600k @ 5.197/1.392 1.392v z170 Asus Hero EVGA 1080ti SC Black (2100/6250) x2 8gb GSkill Trident Z 3600 @ 3804 15-15-15-32-2T 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveCooling
Samsung 950 Pro 512gb (Undelwalt) WD Red 2tb (Pack Yak II) Seagate Expansion Drive 5tb (Phoenix Down II) 3x560mm HardwareLabs Nemesis GTX 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
XPSC Raystorm Pro Watercool Heatkiller 1080ti Full Cover Waterblock EK XTOP Revo Dual D5 (Serial, PWM, v4) EK ZMT (1/2 - 3/4 ID OD) 
CoolingCoolingCoolingCooling
14xEK ACF (Compression Fittings) EK x4 250 (v2) Distilled Water + PT Nuke (Copper Sulphate) 24x140mm Silent Wings 3 
OSMonitorKeyboardPower
Windows 10 Pro 64bit Catleap 27 Inch 2560x1440 IPS 60hz Display Coolermaster Storm Trigger (Brown Switches) EVGA P2 1000w 
CaseMouseMouse PadAudio
Corsair Air 540 Logitech G Pro Tek Syndicate "Raze the World" Desk Mat O2 + Odac by Mayflower Electronics (Rev A) 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Sennheiser HD 800 2xKrk Rokit 6 G2 Blue Yeti (Grey) Rode PSA-1 Arm 
Other
Aquaero 6 LT + Aluminum Heatsink 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i5 6600k Delid @ 4.848/4.848 Asus z170 Hero MSI GTX 980ti @ 1499/4082 1.25v/134% Power 2 x 8gb Gskills Ripjaws V 3131 16-16-16-32 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveHard Drive
Samsung Pro Series 840 256gb (Celapaleis) 1 TB Samsung Drive (Pack Yak) Samsung Pro Series 850 256gb (Celapaleis Reprise) Phoenix Down (External Backup) 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
Noctua D14 Kraken x61 Push-Pull for GPU Windows 10 Pro Catleap 2560x1440 @ 60hz 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
CM Storm Trigger Brown Switches EVGA Supernova 1000w P2 Corsair 540 Air Razer Abyssus 
Mouse PadAudioAudioAudio
Steelseries QcK Mini Blue Yeti Microphone Objective Dac + Amp Sescom AB Switch 
AudioAudioAudioAudio
Krk Rokit 6 G2 x2 Radioshack Ground Loop Isolator (For Rokits) Wooaudio Aluminum Headphone Stand Sennheiser HD 800 
AudioOther
Logitech c920 Webcam NZXT Sentry Mix 2 Fan Controller 
  hide details  
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel CPUs
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel CPUs › Haswell Overclocking Guide [With Statistics]