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Linux and Intel Haswell CPUs

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Does any distro support Haswell CPU already? Which one do you recommend?

I have a laptop with i5 4200U cpu and 4400 IGP

smile.gif
post #2 of 7
Why wouldn't it (except for those distributions that are developed for specific devices)?
If there is a reason, you could just easily check with a Live CD.
post #3 of 7
Honestly, aside from distributions or branch distributions that are geared towards strict 64bit architecture machines, you won't have any issues at all with any of the distributions available. When you compile your box, from the start the kernel won't see what specific type of processor you have, it will only detect at the very basic level whether your architecture is x64 or x86, and to be honest, it wouldn't even get that far because most distributions allow you to choose the environment yourself, which means it is expected of you to know which architecture your machine will be running. But in your case, your processor supports Intel64 so you wouldn't even have to worry about that to begin with.

However, if you are looking to optimize your machine based ON your Haswell processor, that's a different story, and each distribution will have its own processor-specific optimization packages which I'm sure can easily be found if you search on google or sift through their repos. Most people just stick with the generic kernel package though because if you wish to optimize your machine based on whichever processor you have, you will have to custom compile your kernel which obviously means more in-depth configuration.



All in all, no matter what distribution you end up with, I suggest you just compile your machine using the x64 kernel provided. Your Haswell supports Intel64, and you will get more performance from the generic x64 kernel compared to compiling a processor-specific kernel package.
Edited by xH2L - 7/20/13 at 12:02pm
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Tried 2 distros before I gave up. It's not there yet I think frown.gif

Ubuntu 13.04 Gnome edition
Elementary OS 0.2


Ubuntu wouldn't even boot.
eOS installed fine and booted only after updating to 3.10 kernel.
Many things were not working. I had to do a lot of work to have a fully functioning system, and a lot of these fixes were not permanent.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by windowszp View Post

Tried 2 distros before I gave up. It's not there yet I think frown.gif

Ubuntu 13.04 Gnome edition
Elementary OS 0.2


Ubuntu wouldn't even boot.
eOS installed fine and booted only after updating to 3.10 kernel.
Many things were not working. I had to do a lot of work to have a fully functioning system, and a lot of these fixes were not permanent.
With Ubuntu, did you try the UEFI version or the BIOS version?
post #6 of 7
For Ubuntu 13.04 you need to switch to the Linux 3.10 kernel, and you will most likely need mesa9.2 for decently stable iGPU support.
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plan9 View Post

With Ubuntu, did you try the UEFI version or the BIOS version?


The normal ISO I found in Ubuntu's website:
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/13.04/release/

IDK which one I need for my laptop !

When I try to boot off the USB, the bios only detects ONE entry of the USB (unlike my desktop which has 3):

THe entry is like :


UEFI:Sandisk blahhhhh

and only boots to that black grub menu.


On my desktop

There is another entry of USB that doesn't have the UEFI:

and that sends me to the OS ubuntu bootloader, that allows you to select language in the beginning and is more graphical...


This may be pretty much the reason....
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