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【How-To】 Repair Razer Buttons

Poll Results: Are you paid by a company?

 
  • 0% (0)
    Yes, Steelseries
  • 11% (2)
    Yes, Zowie
  • 88% (16)
    No
18 Total Votes  
post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I am not responsible for any damage done to your device. At your own risk. Know how to ground yourself and the reason behind that.
.

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Needless to say, in the normal case you'd void your warranty. I do not know if this is always the case as there are mice which are even advertised with a build in weight, so that some people are forced to disasemble the mouse to remove it. Ask your manufacturer. But altering switches might be too much anway if noticed, just forget about your warranty if you do this i'd say.

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https://youtu.be/K8tgK1v-GdI?t=700

I highly advise to practice all this on a spare mouse first, that's really important. Else you might mess up pretty badly. If you don't have any, then you could buy a cheap one. But as there are different kinds of switches, it can't be just any mouse. I know that the Logitech M100 has compatible ones. Please confirm for me with other cheap mice, then I can put up a list. What I can tell you is to abstain from cheap Microsoft mice, they use different kind of switches.

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Mouse buttons are a big restriciton to many people on which mouse to buy

Many mouse buttons are to stiff like the ever so repeated Huano switches in the Zowie mice or the TTC switches in Steelerises mice. If you've got RSI from clicking Steelseries or Zowie mice, this also helps a lot (being sarcastic).

Being able to do this you get this big restriciton off. Many mice become avilable to you. And of course any mouse becomes much better. You want super easy clicks. Not OC.net poser and bragger heavy clicks. These are Liars.

If you find out your mouse uses zippy switches you should reclaim. If it uses bad omron switches, you should call attention to it at the customer service.

Kael switches are good. And Huano varieties, orange, red. Standard Omron is really bad. Razer "Omrons" are good.



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It's ten times easier than it looks like. It's simply a step by step guide, so you shouldn't be scared off by its size.

What you need:

1. The strong needle of a pair of compasses or something with similar strenght and thinness (not too thin like a simple needle). Improvise. Look through what has to be done first, then you know better.

2. Forceps or something similar like scissors to be able to grab the stem (the little white thing in the microswitch). But you still need the forceps in case you loose a part (read the troubleshooting).

3. Pliers i think is preferred. Again, see how I do it. Do as you see fit.



- if the mouse is not unplugged, do it, then hold down a button for 15 seconds to use up the rest of its electricity.

and


- then ground yourself and your tools. I say generally abstain from touching parts on the PCB.

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So we can begin:

Unscrew your mouse. The screws might be below the mouse feet, use a X-Acto Knife or soemthing to remove them carefully. With me they always come off uneven, it's my impatience, i use the back of my finger nail to flatten it afterwards. Might be not optimal in some cases, expecially if you're using a plastic mouse pad. Just be ready to buy new ones in worst case.

After the screws have gone mice usually still have to be hooked off. So be careful. Some mice have another layer of plastic to unscrew below (rare), don't be confused about that. And some mice are impossible to detach, but these are very few.

Important to avoid difficulties is to note how the cable goes, so you can easily reassemble the mouse without worrying and fiddling around too much.


Once unscrewed



you see the micro switches used for the buttons, you can click them with your fingers. These switches must be rectangular. If they are square, then afaik they are not openable, thus not to be modified.

See how everything is placed first (pcb, lens, where the cable is going through) , or write down, scetch it. take a photo or something. So you can put it back later on without any problems. Usually it's a non-issue though.



There are two ways to open this rectagular switch, depending on model. The first kind you hook from the shorter sides. The other from the longer. Its visible where the cap is hooked in.

If the cap is hooked on the long sides (cheaper mice, non gaming mostly):


Hook it off and while placing your thumb on it so that it doesn't pop out and won't loose any parts, especially the small white stem which becomes loose. (or beige, grey, red, yellow, black.)

Once you released the one side, it should look like this:




What you do now is to push the thick needle through the sides (while holding the switch).



Do it only like this. If you try to pull it off by force or pushing the needle midways, trying to hook the other side off in another way like pushing a top side of the cap, you could very easily push out the iron plate in it or cause it to fall out in another way, and you don't want that. It's a hassle to put it back into place (see troubleshooting). Just do as I described.



If the cap is hooked on the short sides (Omron and TTC mostly or exclusively):



This one much easier. Not an actual switch of that kind, but I am sure you don't need it anyway. You simply place the needle how I did and push through. Then the other side. Pull it off carefully after that.

Hold the cap in place to prevent it to pop off and loose parts.


Once opened (lazy picture alert)



As I stated, there are two ways to do what we want. The first one is to put something inbetween the L-shaped iron (the contact), which is the metal plate (the spring), to shorten the travel distance and force requirement. Or we simply bend the contact which for myself I prefer, because it's the only thing I ever did. I won't present the first method, I simply lack the experience and knowledge (more at the end).

Else to note: Omron switches look different: It's the same mechanic but the contact we want to bend just looks different.


The bending method. Yes this permanently alters your mouse switches...



but of course you can get it back to the same feel, but then it's just not exactly the same. smile.gif Now bend it as much as you like. best is if you use pliers I think; I do it with a key by just pressing down (of course having my fingers at the end of it, naturally). You can test its click behaviour by pressing the bendable part of the spring.

Bend it back in case you overdid it: Use that needle, pliers, or like me such a key or flat piece of iron and your thumb because it's good for minor adjustements, your finger nails (not recommended lol)...

Bend it upwards to make them stiffer.


Finally:

Put the stem back into the cap



Use the end of scissors or use forceps, tweezers. Pick up the PCB and turn it around while still holding it in your hand. Put back the cap, the white stem being below the thin bendable part of the spring. Done. Click them to verify it's fine. Then wait 1 minute and verify again before reassembling.

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More Cautions:


The Scroll Wheel: You might be tempted to remove it to make work easier but there comes quite a risk with it. There are different kinds of scroll wheel mechanisms. You might not remember or be able to put it back once removed. In my example it has no further parts (which are invisible in some cases), so I did remove it to make work and taking photos easier, but it is not necessary at all, the same with removing the cable. And even if you can savely remove the scroll wheel and know how to put it back, you may at least loosen it in that attempt, causing it to be rattling. If it could not be avoided, be careful on how much force you use to put it back in, do it very gently.


Reminder:
1. Mouse feet
2. Detaching mouse (rare)
3. Scroll Wheel
4. Cap
5. Stem
6. Spring
7. Contact bend wrongly, you must bend slowly


Practice it on a cheap mouse as I said.



Trouble shooting:


I lost the stem/cap

-Stems, depending on manufacturer are a tiny bit different in size and consistence. Still, each should work from any rectangular switch. So use one from another mouse. I once ordered micro switches from china to germany, but it took over a month to recieve it. Know where you can get it. Mouser also offers minium quantities. Or get a cheap mouse.

-Caps are a bigger problem, because you can't simply buy any cheap mouse to get the ones you need.

---

When I opened the cap, the spring fell out


This is bad, but you can return it.



Use tweezers or pliers, grab this end and try to put it back, it's tricky. You need to use some force too. If you break it, again, you need to buy new mouse switches. From model to model, they also look different and behave differently I think. But each should fit and give only minimum difference.

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I damaged the cap severely, it doesn't lock in place


Use glue.

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Discussion on the preferred actuation force requirement:

I can not imagine anybody playing any RTS in which he is practiced in with like 150apm plus and likes for instance the mico as it is, and that while having tried out other mice with lighter clicks before. If you've got high physical strenght or let's say heavy fingers, that's different of course. I do not say it's bad period. But why I am mentioning this: If you've not tried out better, you think you got the best. Secondly, if you're not good at a game, like 50apm in RTS, you won't be noticing any holding back anway. People also say that they got used to it. Maybe you just forgot how much better it has been before?

I am saying, try out stuff and see for yourself.

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Health note:

I've got serious RSI issues and thank God for this knowledge. What I want to say is that it took my arm about 10 years to be at that point, and so I would like to caution you, that even if you like hard clicks, they won't be of any use if you will be forced to stick with light ones because you have wrecked your arm. This depends on your own physical strenght, so see for yourself. I advise not to use buttons with which you need real effort to push. And that is still not a guarantee to not get it, I got it with clicks which are harder than others but not too hard at all, the WMO switches.

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Discussion on the first method: Fill the gap

This of course being the cleaner option, but difficult. You'd need to put something there which does not fill it completely. It works with a piece of rubber band and glue, you would need to cut it everytime you want to make adjustments, more time consuming. Put syntetic straw-like stuff inbetween (glued and dried) and add up, that would be easy to adjust. You know what: Bend it.

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Copyright: Yes, through Wordpress Click Here
Edited by Jalal - 4/23/15 at 4:32pm
post #2 of 26
Is this your guide and pictures?

I have modified the switches in my AM a long time ago by bending the contact. I did not notice a decrease in actuation force. Only a decrease in reaction time (why I did it in the first place). I can now get ~130ms reaction time on a good day.

I messed with the spring on the other switch and that made the switch super light. It feels lighter than Omrons.
Edited by popups - 7/19/13 at 7:04pm
post #3 of 26

Nevermind :)


Edited by splinterize - 7/20/13 at 4:35pm
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Yes it's mine, heavily edited, updated. Here the proof. With all the mice I did it to, it decreased the actuation force immensly, I wouldn't be using any mice if it wouldn't be the case. I did it with Huanos too (I think orange ones). Maybe you've bent it just very slightly?
Quote:
Originally Posted by popups View Post

Is this your guide and pictures?

I have modified the switches in my AM a long time ago by bending the contact. I did not notice a decrease in actuation force. Only a decrease in reaction time (why I did it in the first place). I can now get ~130ms reaction time on a good day.

I messed with the spring on the other switch and that made the switch super light. It feels lighter than Omrons.

Edit: Either interchanged spring with contact, but this guide is too clear. So it's just soemone of this forum talking and didn't do a thing.

90% difference in actuation force, it becomes super light.
Edited by Jalal - 4/22/15 at 4:20am
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Super light switches! Soften and Silence Mouse Buttons
Edited by Jalal - 4/22/15 at 4:22am
post #6 of 26
Thanks i did this with the Zowie fk1, and it's pretty clickable now (?). I like to use very slippery mouse pads, and the hardness of the zowie fk1 clicks made me move slightly the mouse while clicking, but now it doesn't redface.gifthumb.gif.
post #7 of 26
I might try this later this afternoon on my G100s. The clicks just seem so off to me
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigtastie View Post

I might try this later this afternoon on my G100s. The clicks just seem so off to me
Do the buttons bend before clicking? Except from eventual stiffness you have problems with mushiness of the buttons? You might need to remold the clicker of the mouse-outer-shell, not of the pcb. But this guide helps anyway a lot for bettering clicks, just not the final solution for that mouse i guess.

Spare mouse?
Edited by Jalal - 4/12/15 at 5:58pm
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jalal View Post

Do the buttons bend before clicking? Except from eventual stiffness you have problems with mushiness of the buttons? You might need to remold the clicker of the mouse-outer-shell, not of the pcb. But this guide helps anyway a lot for bettering clicks, just not the final solution for that mouse i guess.

Spare mouse?

Ever since I bought the G100s I had been doing worse particularly in pistol rounds in CSGO, since I had a problem spamming left mouse button. I modded the shell, since the buttons felt mushy. I added padding to the point of the shell that pushes the (white) stem of the microswitch. In that way, the shell had to travel less distance to get a click. It helped, but it still sucked and felt very unresponsive.
Now I did your mod and made the actual microswitch travel much shorter. The buttons feels MUCH more responsive now. They now lack that tactile feedback I got before, but it's a small sacrafice. I actually think this makes a HUGE difference.
post #10 of 26
I have been using coffee filter paper. Folded once and cut to fit inside the switch.
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