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Novel cooling?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
I was watching a video on a novel way of brazing the other day, they used an induction coil to heat the metal to red heat without any flame or contact.

Just got me thinking about how easy it seems to heat things and conversely how apparently more difficult it seems to cool things.

Got me thinking about microwave/ovens, they heat because the frequency of the microwave oscillation is the same as the vibrational frequency of the hydrogen oxygen bond in water. So the wave interacts in a harmonic way and so increases the vibrational movement and so increases the heat.

Thing is that's an example of oscillations interacting in a harmonic or constructive way which amplifies the molecular vibrations....but I'm aware that oscillations can also interact in a destructive non-harmonic fashion and in this scenario would then reduce molecular vibration and lower the heat of the target.

Anyone know of any cooling methods employing this sort of thing?........just something for greater minds than mine to ponder.
post #2 of 4
I know the physics labs hunting for absolute zero use fancy lazer arrays to hold atoms in place so they cant vibrate, functionally cooling them down. So its possible, but i doubt there is any manufactured product you could buy that would cool anything in such a way. now if you managed to take apart a microwave and if you managed to rebuild it into a Reservoir for a water cooling loop and if you could hack it to create destructive interferance, you might very well have the most dangerous sub zero computer cooling system on the planet xD
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Lenovo E540
(10 items)
 
Plex Server
(11 items)
 
Former Main Rig
(14 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7-4702M 20C6008QUS Intel(R) HD Graphics 4600 Thinkpad DDR3 Laptop RAM 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSCase
Samsung 840 Pro Lenovo DVD Recordable 8x Max Dual Layer Windows 7 Professional Lenovo E540 
MouseOther
E540 UltraNav with FingerPrint Reader Intel Wireless-N 7260 2X2 BGN+Bluetooth 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
Pentium G3420 Gigabyte H81M-S2PV G.Skill Value Series 4TB Western Digital Green 
Optical DriveCoolingOSMonitor
LG GH20NS15 Intel Heatsink Ubuntu 12.04LTS Insignia 19 inch 
KeyboardPowerCase
Logitech K400 Corsair CX430 Zaleman ZM-T2 
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post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Yeah that's interesting stuff, but as you said don't expect to buy it on newegg for a while.

I just strikes me "cooling" needs to have a eureka moment, a bit like cooking/heating did with microwaves..... available methods seem quite limited.

I'm guessing the next break through will be in some advanced direct electric to cooling technology, a bit like peltiers but hopefully more efficient.....just keep watching newegg...lol
post #4 of 4
suggest to read some Nikolai Tesla's patents & adventures , i'm pretty sure there is something in there that would function as "inductive cooling".... u,fortunately the magnetic fields would rip you CPU to pieces smile.gif
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