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A query re LC radiators

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 
I am not an overclocker as such as I work full time and have many other things to do but I do plan to have a go when I build the Haswell.
Now my query is that to the best of my knowledge a radiator is composed of a core that consist of thin flat tubes that are attached to a flat plate at the top and bottom and on the exterior has "ribbons" of thin metal that increase the cooling area of the flattened tubes. The top and bottom flat plates then have what I call a tank where coolant is "impelled" into it and then passes through the tubes to the tank at the opposite end during the transition the heated liquid coolant material is reduced in temperature by air being forced through the exterior cooling fins and tubes.

This is basically how a car cooling system works and is as I know it a thermo syphon / impeller assisted closed loop circuit. The coolant being cycled over and over as dictated by the regulators ie the thermostat.

Now this regulation is not needed in a computer LC system (or computer period) because we would all like the lowest temperature to be the norm. What I do not understand is given that all the radiators that I have seen for LC cooling in computers (including the Intel RTS20111LC I have installed) have the in and out connections at one end ie the same tank.
Given that any fluid or electricity takes the path of least resistance it occurred to me that the coolant would naturally be drawn from the inlet connector and pass directly along that tank to the outlet connector and not actually pass through the core which in my mind defeats the purpose of having a core.

Now I am guessing here and I hope someone can clarify it for me that an internal connection from either of the external connectors has a tube that passes the length of the core to deliver or receive the impelled coolant into the opposite tank - hence allowing the coolant to pass through the core.

I am asking because my Intel I think has had it's impeller / pump fail and I am considering going back to air cooling if what I think should be the correct mode of action in the radiator. I would rather stay with LC as it is much neater and should be more efficient my current set up (Ivy Bridge on an Asus P9Z77-V) failed allowing my i5 3570K to get to temps of 95-101C and eventually ended with shutting the machine down and then not allowing it to start up.

I would be most appreciative if I could get answers from this forum as I thought this was the obvious place to ask rather than trundle around the manufacturers who might be loathe to discuss their set up in their radiators. smile.gif

John
Edited by ICIT2 - 7/29/13 at 10:18pm
post #2 of 2
There are many possible configurations for the tubes in a radiator.

This is one of the most efficient:

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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
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My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
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