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post #11 of 14
I use ESXi in the production and development environments I designed and implemented at work. I have also implemented a Hyper V cluster in a production environment.

They are both great products, but I lean towards VMWare ESXi every time. Its the market leader, its good, it has a massive feature set and its easy to manage. The only Linux distro's that are certified for use in Hyper V are Red Hat based, not a problem to be honest but worth mentioning.

However, both ESXi and Hyper V have one thing in common. Licensing costs which in this case will be more expensive than the hardware you are running them on.

So... I am going to recommend a free alternative. Proxmox.

Proxmox appears to be almost an open source equivalent to VMWare ESXi. I have yet to experiment with it properly but will be doing so shortly. It makes use of KVM virtualisation and container based OpenVZ virtualisation. It supports HA, Live migration, shared storage and has a nice management interface.

I suggest you take a look.

http://www.proxmox.com/proxmox-ve/features

Tom
TJ07 Type R Build
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TJ07 Type R Build
(78 photos)
  
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post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Rocker View Post

I use ESXi in the production and development environments I designed and implemented at work. I have also implemented a Hyper V cluster in a production environment.

They are both great products, but I lean towards VMWare ESXi every time. Its the market leader, its good, it has a massive feature set and its easy to manage. The only Linux distro's that are certified for use in Hyper V are Red Hat based, not a problem to be honest but worth mentioning.

However, both ESXi and Hyper V have one thing in common. Licensing costs which in this case will be more expensive than the hardware you are running them on.

So... I am going to recommend a free alternative. Proxmox.

Proxmox appears to be almost an open source equivalent to VMWare ESXi. I have yet to experiment with it properly but will be doing so shortly. It makes use of KVM virtualisation and container based OpenVZ virtualisation. It supports HA, Live migration, shared storage and has a nice management interface.

I suggest you take a look.

http://www.proxmox.com/proxmox-ve/features

Tom

RHEL is not the only distro certified for Hyper-V. It actually supports the main Linux players in the enterprise world, RHEL, SLES, CentOS, and Debian, with OpenSuSE and Ubuntu being officially added with Server 2012 R2. However, the term "certified" is to be used loosely. What that term really means in regards to Hyper-V, is that Microsoft created Hyper-V Integration Components which give features such as NTP Sync, ability to use the Synthetic NIC, Multi-core, and power control from Hyper-V Management Console or SCVMM. You can load any distro on Hyper-V, but the two biggest drawbacks are going to be single-core and 10/100MB NIC without those Integration Components. VMware is the same way, but they just have more IC out there.

It's worth noting that VMware is only the market leader because of the market share out there. VMware has changed their licensing and costs because of Hyper-V, in order to stay competitive. VMware's market share is droping as more and more people are changing to Hyper-V, but a lot of people don't because they either have several years left on VMware maintenance agreements, or they are waiting for hardware leases/warranties to expire. A lot of companies that have Microsoft EAs are switching to Hyper-V, simply because they already own it. Feature-to-feature, Hyper-V and VMware are definitely on par.

Another free alternative would be XenCloud Platform, which I would recommend over Proxmox. XCP is based on the Open Source Xen hypervisor (which is what XenServer is built on), but XCP has APIs so that it can use the same tools that Citrix releases, basically making it an Open Source version of XenServer. Tons of features.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by tycoonbob View Post

A lot of companies that have Microsoft EAs are switching to Hyper-V, simply because they already own it. Feature-to-feature, Hyper-V and VMware are definitely on par.

As an enterprise VM integrator, I can tell you that the licensing model of Hyper-V with Server 2012 Datacenter Edition is probably the single biggest reason large companies are switching over to Hyper-V vs. VMware. I like and support them both, and I run VMware for my own business virtualization platform, but Hyper-V has one really huge thing going for it ....

Server 2012 Datacenter Edition includes UNLIMITED virtualization rights for Windows 2012/2008R2 guests. That is a HUGE advantage if you're primarily a Windows shop. As mentioned by someone earlier, your license costs usually exceed your hardware costs for large virtualized environments. A $3800 2012 DC edition license can easily support $15,000+ worth of Server 2008R2/2012 Standard Edition licenses worth of VMs.

Greg
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammong View Post

As an enterprise VM integrator, I can tell you that the licensing model of Hyper-V with Server 2012 Datacenter Edition is probably the single biggest reason large companies are switching over to Hyper-V vs. VMware. I like and support them both, and I run VMware for my own business virtualization platform, but Hyper-V has one really huge thing going for it ....

Server 2012 Datacenter Edition includes UNLIMITED virtualization rights for Windows 2012/2008R2 guests. That is a HUGE advantage if you're primarily a Windows shop. As mentioned by someone earlier, your license costs usually exceed your hardware costs for large virtualized environments. A $3800 2012 DC edition license can easily support $15,000+ worth of Server 2008R2/2012 Standard Edition licenses worth of VMs.

Greg

Exactly. I work for a Microsoft consulting firm so I do a lot of work with Server 2012 (VDI/RDS, AD, DNS, DHCP, Hyper-V), and System Center in the enterprise space and this is exactly what I am seeing. Hyper-V and VMware are on par with feature set, and if you are a primarily a Windows shop, Hyper-V is cheaper and does everything a customer needs.
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