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submerging a pc in antifreeze will it work

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
i had this idea today got bored in media gofig was watching the hunger games wonder if it will work comment your thoughts
Edited by davcc22 - 8/1/13 at 5:15am
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post #2 of 9
Antifreeze is slightly conductive, so i wouldn't risk it. Not to mention, that cleaning components that have been completely submerged is incredibly tedious (check mineral oil PCs)
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thepoopscooper View Post

Antifreeze is slightly conductive, so i wouldn't risk it. Not to mention, that cleaning components that have been completely submerged is incredibly tedious (check mineral oil PCs)
was thinking for likie some old junker of the tip for giggles
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post #4 of 9
Hi Davcc22,

Auto antifreeze has lubricants and corrosion inhibitors in it for the cooling system and it is not what conducts the heat away, the water is. That is why you will get best heat transfer and maximum freeze resistance at 50/50 blend.

But you can always try it sounds like an interesting experiment. Let us know how it works out.

Have a great day!
    
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post #5 of 9
Quote:
Green Revolution Cooling, a Texas-based based company, offers probably the most radical departure from traditional data canter cooling. Its CarnotJet system is based on the concept of dunking -- literally placing an entire server rack into a tank of its GreenDEF coolant. The system can be used with almost any server as long as various modifications are carried out first. These include sealing hard drives (as these can't function properly when immersed in liquid,) removing internal cooling fans, and replacing any thermal compounds with ones that won't dissolve in the coolant. The company said CarnotJet can cut cooling energy use by 90 percent and offer a payback period of between one and three years.

Since liquid cooling solutions need new or modified server hardware this does limit their appeal. But, for enterprises planning a hardware refresh or a new data center build out, investing in liquid cooling could be a sound financial investment which reduces energy bills and enhances corporate green credentials.
http://www.enterprisenetworkingplanet.com/datacenter/liquid-cooling-making-a-comeback.html

They use A Mineral Oil mixture.
Anti-Freeze while it has cooling properties is meant to be used in very hot conditions, like a car radiator, and not freeze when cold in freezing conditions.

Water or any of the water cooling liquids would perform the same if not better to Anti-Freeze.
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post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
yeah i have seen something like that on you tube i just had i an idea for a bit of fun but ill need some bits first tho defiantly not using the rig for that worth to much to me
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by preachp View Post

Hi Davcc22,

Auto antifreeze has lubricants and corrosion inhibitors in it for the cooling system and it is not what conducts the heat away, the water is. That is why you will get best heat transfer and maximum freeze resistance at 50/50 blend.

But you can always try it sounds like an interesting experiment. Let us know how it works out.

Have a great day!
im going to try it in summer when its not so cold out side in case the whole thing decides to catch fire:cheers:
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post #8 of 9
Uhmm.....not so sure this will work out .....it's not just if a liquid is conductive that has to be considered.....the nature of the molecules themselves can have an effect.....some have a high dipole moment.....that is to say they are polar, one end of the molecule being negative and the other positive.....they tend to align themselves according to any electric field.....problems can occur when you have high frequency oscillating voltages as the molecules try to flip back and fore depending on the electric field and I guess latency in this tend to dampen the voltage oscillation....so this may be a problem with high frequency cpu operations......still never say never......may be less of a problem than I imagine......keep us posted.thumb.gif
post #9 of 9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by technogiant View Post

Uhmm.....not so sure this will work out .....it's not just if a liquid is conductive that has to be considered.....the nature of the molecules themselves can have an effect.....some have a high dipole moment.....that is to say they are polar, one end of the molecule being negative and the other positive.....they tend to align themselves according to any electric field.....problems can occur when you have high frequency oscillating voltages as the molecules try to flip back and fore depending on the electric field and I guess latency in this tend to dampen the voltage oscillation....so this may be a problem with high frequency cpu operations......still never say never......may be less of a problem than I imagine......keep us posted.thumb.gif
will do im just waiting for some nice weather and an old junker of a pc to do this one (dont want to smke out my room XD)
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