Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Power Supplies › Using different cable killing my PSU?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Using different cable killing my PSU? - Page 6

post #51 of 59
Thread Starter 
I switched back to the tighter white cable, it fits a little tighter dye to the material. Is that okay? I have been getting whea errors at what was previously a rock solid OC so I am eliminating factors. Hoping its not CPU degradation
post #52 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by maneil99 View Post

I switched back to the tighter white cable, it fits a little tighter dye to the material. Is that okay? I have been getting whea errors at what was previously a rock solid OC so I am eliminating factors. Hoping its not CPU degradation
CPU degradation doesn't happen unless the CPU has been zapped by static electricity or surges or exposed to a torch.

A tighter fit of the power cable is OK.

The surge protector can be related to your problem only if the protector is faulty and has bad connections inside or at its receptacles.
Edited by larymoencurly - 8/6/13 at 1:04am
post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

Actually people do trust expensive electronics to <$0.50 protection components, as a search for MOVs in the Digi-key catalog shows.

I said an engineer in an Anandtech forum quoted NIST and IEEE, and he said 35J was the highest energy level measured for any surge. But industry doesn't like energy ratings because they're not stated in a standardized way. The UL 1449 voltage rating wasn't considered too important by Eaton because almost all electronics can stand way more than the 330VAC minimum threshhold that so many companies like to brag about, and that voltage isn't a good indicator of the actual protection offered.

You failed to address the mistake made in the How Stuff Works article about surge protectors, so I'll ask about it again: What is the typical high voltage threshhold of the series circuit design surge protectors mentioned in that article?

Quote:
Originally Posted by looniam View Post

actually people make a lot of mistakes and do stupid things they are not aware they are doing - so does that make it ok? NO. too bad you have a problem that i advise against it.

and to be honest you seem to have some problems; you don't understand that i asked of you what you demanded of me, some documentation to back up your claim. its all fine and dandy if you want to quote a forum post, though linking to it is rather customary, but fine. where is the source? you said tomWes stated a NIST surge guide, ok, where is the guide?

and now you want to come up with some garbage that almost all electronics can handle a 330VAC jolt? i can't count on my fingers and toes how many audio/video companies are glad you never handled their gear along with countless musicians.

so sorry, again, if you think i didn't answer your question but i am done wasting my time

cheers.
Those $0.50 MOV surge protectors aren't junk and are found in even the highest quality surge protector strips; it's just that MOVs are produced in such huge quantities that they don't cost much.

I didn't quote any sources with mistakes in them, but you did, and you still haven't explained the error your source made about the voltage threshhold of series circuit design surge protectors, so what is that voltage?

If most electronics can't handle 330V surges, why is that the surge threshhold that most retail 120VAC surge protectors aim for? That 330V isn't regular continuous 60 Hz sine wave 330V but surges, and apparently the UL surge test uses pulses of about 28 uS in length (actually takes 8 uS to reach peak voltage, which then lasts 20 uS). What kind of 330VAC were you thinking of? Even lowly digital chips meant to operate from 1V - 5V DC are designed to withstand static surges of at least 1,000V (3,000V used to be the minimum), so why is just 330V ridiculous?
post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

Those $0.50 MOV surge protectors aren't junk and are found in even the highest quality surge protector strips; it's just that MOVs are produced in such huge quantities that they don't cost much.

I didn't quote any sources with mistakes in them, but you did, and you still haven't explained the error your source made about the voltage threshhold of series circuit design surge protectors, so what is that voltage?

If most electronics can't handle 330V surges, why is that the surge threshhold that most retail 120VAC surge protectors aim for? That 330V isn't regular continuous 60 Hz sine wave 330V but surges, and apparently the UL surge test uses pulses of about 28 uS in length (actually takes 8 uS to reach peak voltage, which then lasts 20 uS). What kind of 330VAC were you thinking of? Even lowly digital chips meant to operate from 1V - 5V DC are designed to withstand static surges of at least 1,000V (3,000V used to be the minimum), so why is just 330V ridiculous?

LOL. you posted a quote with no verification. if there are mistakes it would not be known unless the source of the opinion is read. take a step back and ponder this:
if someone told you cpu A was better/as good in gaming/video encoding than cpu B because of testing done; would just foolishly accept that conclusion w/o seeing what testing and under what conditions the testing was done?

so you post an opinion without citing the source? and in the meantime try to ridicule an article based on a standard not related to the discussion? and if you haven't gotten it already; i am not going to play your "how much/what do you know game." the actual clamping voltage can easily be found than the general details covered in the article.
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

CPU degradation doesn't happen unless the CPU has been zapped by static electricity or surges or exposed to a torch.
oh? WOW! pretty bold statement and entirely incorrect. seriously, any error i may have made would be on the side of caution, yours would just out and out cause harm.

say bye bye to your credibility and this discussion with that can of worms.
loon 3.2
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770K Asus P8Z77-V Pro EVGA 980TI SC+ 16Gb PNY ddr3 1866 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
PNY 1311 240Gb 1 TB Seagate 3 TB WD Blue DVD DVDRW+/- 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
EKWB P280 kit EK-VGA supremacy Win X LG 24MC57HQ-P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Zero [blues] EVGA SuperNova 750 G2 Stryker M [hammered and drilled] corsair M65 
AudioAudio
SB Recon3D Klipsch ProMedia 2.1  
  hide details  
Reply
loon 3.2
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
i7-3770K Asus P8Z77-V Pro EVGA 980TI SC+ 16Gb PNY ddr3 1866 
Hard DriveHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
PNY 1311 240Gb 1 TB Seagate 3 TB WD Blue DVD DVDRW+/- 
CoolingCoolingOSMonitor
EKWB P280 kit EK-VGA supremacy Win X LG 24MC57HQ-P 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Ducky Zero [blues] EVGA SuperNova 750 G2 Stryker M [hammered and drilled] corsair M65 
AudioAudio
SB Recon3D Klipsch ProMedia 2.1  
  hide details  
Reply
post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by larymoencurly View Post

Those $0.50 MOV surge protectors aren't junk and are found in even the highest quality surge protector strips; it's just that MOVs are produced in such huge quantities that they don't cost much.

I didn't quote any sources with mistakes in them, but you did, and you still haven't explained the error your source made about the voltage threshhold of series circuit design surge protectors, so what is that voltage?

If most electronics can't handle 330V surges, why is that the surge threshhold that most retail 120VAC surge protectors aim for? That 330V isn't regular continuous 60 Hz sine wave 330V but surges, and apparently the UL surge test uses pulses of about 28 uS in length (actually takes 8 uS to reach peak voltage, which then lasts 20 uS). What kind of 330VAC were you thinking of? Even lowly digital chips meant to operate from 1V - 5V DC are designed to withstand static surges of at least 1,000V (3,000V used to be the minimum), so why is just 330V ridiculous?

Quote:
Originally Posted by looniam View Post

LOL. you posted a quote with no verification. if there are mistakes it would not be known unless the source of the opinion is read. take a step back and ponder this:
if someone told you cpu A was better/as good in gaming/video encoding than cpu B because of testing done; would just foolishly accept that conclusion w/o seeing what testing and under what conditions the testing was done?

so you post an opinion without citing the source? and in the meantime try to ridicule an article based on a standard not related to the discussion? and if you haven't gotten it already; i am not going to play your "how much/what do you know game." the actual clamping voltage can easily be found than the general details covered in the article.
oh? WOW! pretty bold statement and entirely incorrect. seriously, any error i may have made would be on the side of caution, yours would just out and out cause harm.

say bye bye to your credibility and this discussion with that can of worms.
I don't remember if the IEEE or Eaton corp. documents I cited giving the actual waveform of that 8uS/20uS surge pulse, but its use is required to certify that a product meets UL's 1449 surge protection standard. What errors are in those documents, unlike the error in the How Stuff Works article you posted, which said series circuit design surge supressors detect when high voltage is present? For the 4th time, what is the typical threshhold voltage for series circuit design surge supressors? Are you trying to keep your answer a secret? Or do you know of a series circuit design surge supressor that isn't an inductor or fuse?

I assumed CPU degradation meant partial damage that prevented operation at full speed or with as much overclocking, not outright failure of the whole CPU or one of its cores. Because that's not clear, I'll admit that CPUs can be damaged by something other than static zaps or external heat, such as shorts on the motherboard or voltage regulator failure.

By far the most common industry standard for power strip supressors is UL 1449. It's not like CPUs, where there's not a single benchmark that everybody agrees
is THE measurement for performance, except maybe for supercomputers.

I didn't just cite an out-of-thin-air opinion that the maximum surge voltage most electronics can withstand is higher than the 330V minimum surge threshhold for UL1440, but I also mentioned industry standards of 1,000V - 3,000V. 3,000V used to be the minimum standard.
post #56 of 59
Thread Starter 
This is really hostile, I just wanted to know about a black mark on my PSU, never even got the answer....
post #57 of 59
I have seasonic m12II and the power cable which came with it is European one which I cannot use in my country so I've been using the one for my monitor. I didn't check the voltages or anything coz I was using the same cable(monitor one) for my previous psu too.. but gonna check it tonight and compare with the one which came with the new psu.
Sexy
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 - 4770 MSI Z87 GD65 - Gaming Palit GTX 760 G.Skill 8gb DDR3 @ 1600mhz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
1TB Seagate 7200rpm Moserbaer dvd-rw Cooler Master Hyper 212X and 6 case fans. Windows 7 Ultimate x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung SyncMaster 2033sw  Moserbaer  Seasonic M12ii - 650w Cooler Master HAF 912 Combat 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech M100r Zebronics TimePad  Philips Explode - 2.1 
  hide details  
Reply
Sexy
(15 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 - 4770 MSI Z87 GD65 - Gaming Palit GTX 760 G.Skill 8gb DDR3 @ 1600mhz 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
1TB Seagate 7200rpm Moserbaer dvd-rw Cooler Master Hyper 212X and 6 case fans. Windows 7 Ultimate x64 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
Samsung SyncMaster 2033sw  Moserbaer  Seasonic M12ii - 650w Cooler Master HAF 912 Combat 
MouseMouse PadAudio
Logitech M100r Zebronics TimePad  Philips Explode - 2.1 
  hide details  
Reply
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by maneil99 View Post

This is really hostile, I just wanted to know about a black mark on my PSU, never even got the answer....

That was actually answered, by another member and myself. The black marks are from the loose cable moving around and creating sparks.
I would recommend using the white cable over the ps3 cable.
As for the errors you're getting, check your hard drives for corruption the cable falling out could have corrupted the file system/os (run chkdsk and sfc /scannow), check drivers, bios updates, clocks.
post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by maneil99 View Post

This is really hostile, I just wanted to know about a black mark on my PSU, never even got the answer....
The black mark is harmless and was caused by normal arcing that occurs when a live AC cord is plugged in or when the cord is loose in use. One reason for arcing is the AC line filter, which contains capacitors that charge up when the AC is plugged in, whether or not the PSU is turned on.
Edited by larymoencurly - 8/7/13 at 9:53pm
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Power Supplies
Overclock.net › Forums › Components › Power Supplies › Using different cable killing my PSU?