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Using Computer/Server heat to warm other parts of the house? - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricFiskCGD View Post

Thanks everyone for the responses;

Another inspiration for this project are the winter bills we get, a high electric bill and a high bill for home heating oil. If we could only use one to off-set the other, that would be really nice but would include some really far out engineering that’s just beyond my grasp.

What I’m really trying to do is find a way to use the house in the middle of winter as a heat sink but the only solution that makes sense this afternoon is just have a heavy-duty fan pull the heat out of the server and circulate it around the cold basement.

As an aside – the basement is a constant 50 degrees through-out the year, the only thing that concerns me is the humidity but I’ve been tackling that with a dehumidifier.

for your home, it's VERY easy. the answer is with liquid cooling. it WILL be expensive starting out because you have to invest in quite a large copper plumbing project, but after that is done, it's a matter of running your server hot enough to warm up the room biggrin.gif maybe you can do some coin mining to offset the cost of electricity. essentially you have to line the basement ceiling with copper pipes. maybe 50 feet worth of copper pipes should do the job. those copper pipes will act as radiator for your liquid system you don't actually need a rad since you will have enough copper pipes to dissipate the heat long before the liquid returns to the heat source.

do realize the amount of heat a computer puts out is far too small to actually warm up a house in the winter, but it does supplement your existing heating system or if you want to use it more like a space heater for localized heating. however if you want to do that, you might as well just put your computer under the desk and the heat exhausted by the computer will be trapped under the desk by the desktop and create a localized heat zone for when you are at the desk.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by oicw View Post

For my apartment in temperamental Vancouver, one system folding 24/7 during winter is enough to keep it warm in all but the coldest days, which is why I plan on adding a GPU for this winter. I only fold during winter months, so this is the closest example of heating a room using residual computer heat.

What's nuts is that the way my roomies + my apartment is designed it seems to trap the heat from my i7 950 in my room even when my window is open and the patio door is open. The rest of the apartment will have a breeze rushing through it, and yet somehow my room is still warmer. tongue.gif
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HTPC
(9 items)
 
HP dv6 laptop
(13 items)
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Core i5 4690K ASRock Z97 Extreme4 XFX Radeon 7950 32 GB DDR3-2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 850 EVO SSD Samsung DVD/CD-writer Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO Windows 7 
MonitorMonitorPowerCase
ASUS PA248Q Dell U2412M XFX 850W Black Edition XXX Fractal Design Arc Midi 2 
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Kingston ValueRAM DDR3-1333 WD Caviar Blue Windows 7 64-bit Sony 32" TV set 
Case
Apex TX-381 
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post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks again for all the great posts and ideas.

The problem with all of my projects is my tenacity; I think it’s a good idea and I have to see it through to the end and complete it or have a better understanding of why it won’t work for practical reasons. Money is “no object” when I think that what I’m doing now will save or make money in the future. I also know that I’ll practically keep everything forever anyways and nothing will go to waste…

… Which might be my problem with endless clutter; cleaning up sometimes feel like I’m shoveling water against a rising tide and incoming waves.

I get really excited when I look at pictures of those wall-mounted computers for a number of reasons. I always thought that computers have this high-tech beauty and poetry to them and felt bad that we have to put them in boxes and put them on the ground/floor where they get exposed to dirt, mud, dog hair and the occasional blood from the slaughtering of people who knock on my door at unwelcome hours. Keeping a computer open and exposed will help keep them cooler and away from floor traffic dirt and those pesky blood clots and other gore.

The wall mounted open-format seems to me like it solves a couple of problems at the same time such as the cost of a new case and keeping the air flowing around the CPU and off the floor without taking up too much real estate on my desk or shelf.

The only question I have this morning is… where’s the power button? How do you turn it on and turn it off?
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricFiskCGD View Post

Thanks again for all the great posts and ideas.

The problem with all of my projects is my tenacity; I think it’s a good idea and I have to see it through to the end and complete it or have a better understanding of why it won’t work for practical reasons. Money is “no object” when I think that what I’m doing now will save or make money in the future. I also know that I’ll practically keep everything forever anyways and nothing will go to waste…

… Which might be my problem with endless clutter; cleaning up sometimes feel like I’m shoveling water against a rising tide and incoming waves.

I get really excited when I look at pictures of those wall-mounted computers for a number of reasons. I always thought that computers have this high-tech beauty and poetry to them and felt bad that we have to put them in boxes and put them on the ground/floor where they get exposed to dirt, mud, dog hair and the occasional blood from the slaughtering of people who knock on my door at unwelcome hours. Keeping a computer open and exposed will help keep them cooler and away from floor traffic dirt and those pesky blood clots and other gore.

The wall mounted open-format seems to me like it solves a couple of problems at the same time such as the cost of a new case and keeping the air flowing around the CPU and off the floor without taking up too much real estate on my desk or shelf.

The only question I have this morning is… where’s the power button? How do you turn it on and turn it off?

The power button is all up to you! A couple years ago I built a machine that is currently hanging on the wall, we didn't have a huge budget for it so it obviously is not as nice as it could be. Although we never put it into fruition our idea for the powerbutton was a Staple's easy button. Instead we now just use the power button on the motherboard.

You could really use almost any button, or make your own, just make sure you don't fry the motherboard with an added draw of power.
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Combat 1.1
(16 items)
 
PAIN
(11 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel Core i7 3930K P9X79 PRO GIGABYTE G1 Gaming GeForce GTX 970 Samsung  
RAMHard DriveHard DriveOptical Drive
Samsung  Crucial M4 64GB SSD Seagate Barracuda 1TB ASUS 24x DVD Burner 
CoolingOSOSMonitor
NH-D14 Windows 7 Ultamite 64 bit Arch Linux ASUS VW246H Glossy Black 24" HDMI Widescreen LC... 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Logitech Combo mk520 Seasonic X Series 650W NXT Phantom 410 Logitech Combo mk520 
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Windows 7 Enterprise Seasonic M12II 750w Plexiglass 
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post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricFiskCGD View Post

Thanks again for all the great posts and ideas.

The problem with all of my projects is my tenacity; I think it’s a good idea and I have to see it through to the end and complete it or have a better understanding of why it won’t work for practical reasons. Money is “no object” when I think that what I’m doing now will save or make money in the future. I also know that I’ll practically keep everything forever anyways and nothing will go to waste…

… Which might be my problem with endless clutter; cleaning up sometimes feel like I’m shoveling water against a rising tide and incoming waves.

I get really excited when I look at pictures of those wall-mounted computers for a number of reasons. I always thought that computers have this high-tech beauty and poetry to them and felt bad that we have to put them in boxes and put them on the ground/floor where they get exposed to dirt, mud, dog hair and the occasional blood from the slaughtering of people who knock on my door at unwelcome hours. Keeping a computer open and exposed will help keep them cooler and away from floor traffic dirt and those pesky blood clots and other gore.

The wall mounted open-format seems to me like it solves a couple of problems at the same time such as the cost of a new case and keeping the air flowing around the CPU and off the floor without taking up too much real estate on my desk or shelf.

The only question I have this morning is… where’s the power button? How do you turn it on and turn it off?

the problem with wall mounted open air system is dust. eventually you will have dust cluttering up your heatsinks. and some heatsinks (GPU heatsink) are harder to clean then others. it's not a matter of IF, it's a matter of when the dust will cause a serious problem.
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