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[Ars Technica] Scientists create “impossible material”—dubbed Upsalite—by accident - Page 4

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostmage View Post

The invention of the microwave oven is pretty good too. A researcher walked by an operating magnetron (intended for radar purposes at the time) and it melted a candy bar in his pocket.

it did more then melt the candy bar, many of those working in microwave radar at that time, many have lukemia now, not cancerous in many cases but simply disfunctional bone marrow and massive internal organ damage. Literally cooked from the inside.
post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotonFanatic View Post

I'll take some. It will be extremely useful for cooling in areas of high humidity. Much of the lower U.S has high humidity summers that make it nearly unbearable to be outside in the summertime. Mix this stuff into most of the building materials that are going to contact the interior building air, and you could potentially save a lot of money on cooling costs in the summer. Its a lot easier to cool dry air, than it is to cool moist air. It would be like running a dehumidifier, with no electricity cost.

Depending on how humid it is, and how well this stuff works to pull water out of the air, it could potentially solve drought problems in certain areas. Areas of course, that often have high humidity, but low rainfall. Like here in TX.

Yup, could definitely make good use of Upsalite here too for high humidity year round.
Edited by Tatakai All - 8/17/13 at 5:33pm
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Red October
(18 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition (C2) Asus Crosshair V Formula Asus GTX 680 DC2 4GB Mushkin Redline 8GB DDR3 2133 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 830 & Western Digital 640 Black  LiteOn Blu-Ray & Lightscribe CD/DVD Corsair H100 Windows 7 64 Bit 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
23' Samsung LED XL2370 1920x1080 Ducky 9008-G2 OCN Edition (MX Brown) / Ducky Sh... Corsair 750HX Cooler Master HAF 932 - Paint Modded 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
Razer Deathadder Sennheiser HD 595 X-Fi Titanium HD (Modded) Bravo Audio V1 rolled w/ Mastushita  
Audio
Beyerdynamic DT 770 Pro 80 
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post #33 of 34
i wonder if this stuff could be used to make drinking water straight from sea water without a desalination process at reasonable cost for third world countries. let it absorb sea water, then dry it in the sun and capture the vapor.
post #34 of 34
Not is impossible.
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