Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel Motherboards › Cheapest way to repair a damaged ATX12V/P4 connector
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cheapest way to repair a damaged ATX12V/P4 connector

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hello,

Im not sure exactly what this connector is called, best guess in my topic title.

Basically im curious the cheapest way to fix this, its a socket DDR2 775 board so its not worth a lot to me but I would love to get this system/box of parts running again.

QDhUNS5.png

For anyone not going to read the full post: I caused this damage my self and I would like to fix it as cheaply as possible. I don't own any soldering tools.

Waffle:
Basically one day I was cleaning my computer and had to remove this cable. The plastic male connector coming from my PSU cracked off and sat wedged inside the female motherboard connector. Sadly the connectors on the PSU are extremely tight fitting and a lot of force was needed to remove it.

Needing the computer working ASAP I risked re-connecting it and turning it back on, it worked happily for a few days until it suddenly powered off.

The cable was then adjusted slightly for another few days of use, before I got extremely nervous and took it apart.

It was all badly charred/burnt.

I had to cut away the front of the motherboard connector to retrieve the piece of PSU connector that was previously lodged in there, and at this stage was now partly melted.

The PSU is fine and still in use to this day in another system, it only suffered a cracked plastic connector and its metal parts seem fine for the most part.


Proposed Bodges:
  1. Desolder + resolder a new connector (Cons: Need soldering iron, desoldering sucker?, solder)
  2. Solder new connector onto existing connector (No desolder sucker thingy needed, easy enough to do?)
  3. Clean connector somehow? (Sand paper? Alcohol ?
  4. Buy a new board - would rather not go down that route.
  5. Anything else?

It should be noted I have zero positive soldering experience, and no desoldering experience at all.
post #2 of 6

1.

 

Probably 'bout time to get a soldering iron anyway.

2nd Rig
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
[Intel] 2500k [4.5ghz] [1.3 volts] [AsRock] P67 Extreme 6 [Sapphire] 6950 Toxic (@ Stock) [Samsung] Low voltage memory [@1866 mHz 9-9-9-24] 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
[Corsair] 120gb Force GT Some Lite-On thing [Coolermaster] v8 Winders 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
[Gateway] FDH2402 [Microsoft] Sidewinder x6 [XFX] Core Edition PRO850W [In Win] Dragon Rider 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
[CM Storm] Sentinel Advance II [AUDIOTRAK] Prodigy HD2 ADVANCE DE [Polk Audio] PSW 505 and Monitor 40's Denon AVR-791 
Audio
Infinity P153's 
  hide details  
Reply
2nd Rig
(17 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
[Intel] 2500k [4.5ghz] [1.3 volts] [AsRock] P67 Extreme 6 [Sapphire] 6950 Toxic (@ Stock) [Samsung] Low voltage memory [@1866 mHz 9-9-9-24] 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
[Corsair] 120gb Force GT Some Lite-On thing [Coolermaster] v8 Winders 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
[Gateway] FDH2402 [Microsoft] Sidewinder x6 [XFX] Core Edition PRO850W [In Win] Dragon Rider 
MouseAudioAudioAudio
[CM Storm] Sentinel Advance II [AUDIOTRAK] Prodigy HD2 ADVANCE DE [Polk Audio] PSW 505 and Monitor 40's Denon AVR-791 
Audio
Infinity P153's 
  hide details  
Reply
post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidiaftw12 View Post

1.

Probably 'bout time to get a soldering iron anyway.

Could you recommend what kind I would need? How hot? What tip? I damaged a different items PCB/track trying to desoldering something a few years ago using a gas soldering iorn.

Im asking so I dont make this situation worse smile.gif
post #4 of 6
Since you're working with electronics, you would want a low wattage iron that way the heat from it can't damage anything. A 20-40W would probably work great, preferably the lower end.
post #5 of 6
this above thumb.gif
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
What do you guys think of trying to clean up the contacts a little and soldering the wires from one of these connectors directly onto my destroyed connector? Eg just cutting the wires in half, and soldering them directly onto the 4 pins.

I honestly don't feel confident enough with what I need to buy, and then actually desoldering the connect connector without doing damage.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Intel Motherboards
Overclock.net › Forums › Intel › Intel Motherboards › Cheapest way to repair a damaged ATX12V/P4 connector