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Any advice on my i5 2500k OC?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Hey guys,

I did a reinstall of Windows recently, and during the process of installing all the drivers, I updated my BIOS for the first time. I did forget to save my overclock though... so I have to redo it, which is making me reevaluate my previous overclock. Here's what I had, I have an ASUS P8Z68-V:

ASUS BIOS Power Mode: High Performance
BCLK: 100.0
Turbo Ratio: by all cores
Multi: 45x
PLL Overvoltage: Auto
EPU Power Save: Disable
OC Tuner: Cancel/Off
CPU Ratio: Auto
Speedstep: Enabled
Turbo: Enabled
VRM: 350
Load Line Calibration: Ultra High
Phase Control: Optimize
Duty Control: Extreme
CPU Current Capability: 120%
CPU Voltage: Manual- 1.36v
Adaptive Thermal: Enabled
Active Cores: All
Limit Maximum: Disable
Virtualization: Disable
CPU C1E: Enabled
C3 and C6: Auto

According to CPU-Z, I'm getting a (mostly) constant 1.36v.

I've been using that for months, and it has been completely stable. Never broke 70C in gaming. But I'm wondering if I can make it more efficient than that, because 1.36v does seem a little high. 4.5ghz is the highest I want to go, I just want try and see if I can get the voltage and heat down a bit more.

Any tips and suggestions are welcome. I also have some questions of my own if you don't mind.

1.) Is it worth keeping a manual offset, or changing it back to auto (and a - sign)?

2.) How about LLC and CPU current capability. I heard that these can be tweaked so that you can get a little cooler temps and the same stability, though I don't know which settings are optimal.

3.) This is more of a subjective question, but do feel that I should keep my C States and Speedstep enabled? That way my CPU can downclock when it is not needed as much. Though I don't mind leaving it on all the time, and there might be some issues that come from power saving features, so personally I don't think I'd ever want to do that unless running it at 4.5ghz all the time isn't any good.


As per usual, thanks so much guys smile.gif
post #2 of 4
theres 2 different kinds. turbo overclock and a consistent(whatever the standard is called) overclock(speed doesn't change per load). for the standard i can only achieve 4.3ghz, doing a turbo overclock i can get 4.7ghz, with the turbo overclock it also maintains a lower core temp so thats what i stick to. you also want to tweak the base clock between 98 and 106(again depends on the chip/board you have)

overclock style>chip>mobo... it'll take a day or two of trial and error on both methods before you'll find a true stable overclock

my 2600k constantly crashed while doing a turbo overclock but was very stable by just setting the speed to 4.8ghz. my friends could achieve higher overclocks by dropping base clock slightly, you really have to look at some threads based per your board, mine dosnt like going past 1.38v where as my buddies does almost nothing without touching 1.4v

big thing to remember, having an asus, im sure you have OC profiles, if you find a stable overclock on turbo or standard save them and tweak from there
    
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I5 2500K 4.7ghz 1.36v MSI Z68A-GD80 (G3) MSI GTX 680 TFIII 4GB SLI 1248mhz core 6.5ghz mem 16GB Patriot Viper X Div 2 
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post #3 of 4
Hi there!

I too have a 2500k with a P8Z68-V Pro, its under a Thermalright Silver Arrow thumb.gif

4.5GHz is a good clock to run 24/7 on air. I get 60C@4.5Ghz, but that may just be the cooler.

1)Manual Voltage is a reliable way of guaranteeing a stable overclock at a safe, known voltage. It does have the problem of the C states and clocking down to 1.6GHz still use that voltage, where as offset looks up a VID table to adjust voltage according to load/speed.

2)LLC is something that is a must when using manual voltage. Vdroop occurs when load is placed on CPU, and the LLC is meant to increase voltage to keep that in check. Otherwise, the OC may crash. Ultra High is a suitable setting.

3) There is not much of a point in keeping those power saving features if you are running on manual voltage imo.

I have heard that offset can be stressful to the VRM. You should be fine with your use of manual

If you are interested in offset, do you mind a little bit of experimenting on my method (an improvement on using offsets)? It may be dangerous though lol.

Put offset on AUTO so that the CPU uses VID voltages. This is different to the (-) offsets that everyone else uses, and may result in your CPU using the excessive voltages that the CPU demands when at load, which may destroy the CPU. Monitor these voltages carefully and use lower clocks at first. However, Vdroop will cause the actual voltage to be lower than the VID on load, and this should be intended. Put LLC on auto for this reason.

You see, having (-) offsets usually means you have to disable the clocking down, as the CPU would not be stable at 1.6GHz because you feed less than the VID it asks for. Giving it the VID voltage means you can sustain the 1.6GHz downclock of EIST, and at load you feed it less than VID as a result of the Vdroop. This means you have it going to 0.7V at 1.6Ghz EIST whilst (hopefully, you need to test this before hitting 4.5Ghz+ so that even if VID is fed it is still safe) staying below 1.35V at load. You save power when it has no load, by it going to 1.6 and lower voltage.

As I say, be careful with this method, as it is experimental and go small steps at a time. Be sure your voltage stays under 1.4V at load. If it does go over you should immediately stop all stress and reset the overclock to a lower clock.

Also, can others please comment on the method? I have not seen it anywhere else, and I want some feedback.
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i5 2500k ASUS P8Z68-V PRO Geforce GTX 560 Ti G.Skills Ripjaws X 
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Sig Rig
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i5 2500k ASUS P8Z68-V PRO Geforce GTX 560 Ti G.Skills Ripjaws X 
Hard DriveCoolingMonitorPower
OCZ Vertex 3 120GB MAX IOPS Thermalright Silver Arrow Dell U2412HM Corsair AX850 
Case
CM Storm Enforcer 
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post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by guiJY View Post

Hi there!

I too have a 2500k with a P8Z68-V Pro, its under a Thermalright Silver Arrow thumb.gif

4.5GHz is a good clock to run 24/7 on air. I get 60C@4.5Ghz, but that may just be the cooler.

1)Manual Voltage is a reliable way of guaranteeing a stable overclock at a safe, known voltage. It does have the problem of the C states and clocking down to 1.6GHz still use that voltage, where as offset looks up a VID table to adjust voltage according to load/speed.

2)LLC is something that is a must when using manual voltage. Vdroop occurs when load is placed on CPU, and the LLC is meant to increase voltage to keep that in check. Otherwise, the OC may crash. Ultra High is a suitable setting.

3) There is not much of a point in keeping those power saving features if you are running on manual voltage imo.

I have heard that offset can be stressful to the VRM. You should be fine with your use of manual

If you are interested in offset, do you mind a little bit of experimenting on my method (an improvement on using offsets)? It may be dangerous though lol.

Put offset on AUTO so that the CPU uses VID voltages. This is different to the (-) offsets that everyone else uses, and may result in your CPU using the excessive voltages that the CPU demands when at load, which may destroy the CPU. Monitor these voltages carefully and use lower clocks at first. However, Vdroop will cause the actual voltage to be lower than the VID on load, and this should be intended. Put LLC on auto for this reason.

You see, having (-) offsets usually means you have to disable the clocking down, as the CPU would not be stable at 1.6GHz because you feed less than the VID it asks for. Giving it the VID voltage means you can sustain the 1.6GHz downclock of EIST, and at load you feed it less than VID as a result of the Vdroop. This means you have it going to 0.7V at 1.6Ghz EIST whilst (hopefully, you need to test this before hitting 4.5Ghz+ so that even if VID is fed it is still safe) staying below 1.35V at load. You save power when it has no load, by it going to 1.6 and lower voltage.

As I say, be careful with this method, as it is experimental and go small steps at a time. Be sure your voltage stays under 1.4V at load. If it does go over you should immediately stop all stress and reset the overclock to a lower clock.

Also, can others please comment on the method? I have not seen it anywhere else, and I want some feedback.

im just gonna +1 you for hitting half a dozen aspects i missed. unfortunately my profiles have been set, backed up, and saved for nearly a year.
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
I5 2500K 4.7ghz 1.36v MSI Z68A-GD80 (G3) MSI GTX 680 TFIII 4GB SLI 1248mhz core 6.5ghz mem 16GB Patriot Viper X Div 2 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
2xM4 64 GB Raid 0 4x5900rpm Baracuda Raid 0 Pioneer BDR Windows 7 Home Premium Triple Asus 27" monitors 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Tt Challenger Ultimate Corsair AX-1200 NZXT Switch 810 Mionix Naos 5000 
Mouse Pad
Mionix Propus 380 
  hide details  
Reply
    
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
I5 2500K 4.7ghz 1.36v MSI Z68A-GD80 (G3) MSI GTX 680 TFIII 4GB SLI 1248mhz core 6.5ghz mem 16GB Patriot Viper X Div 2 
Hard DriveOptical DriveOSMonitor
2xM4 64 GB Raid 0 4x5900rpm Baracuda Raid 0 Pioneer BDR Windows 7 Home Premium Triple Asus 27" monitors 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse
Tt Challenger Ultimate Corsair AX-1200 NZXT Switch 810 Mionix Naos 5000 
Mouse Pad
Mionix Propus 380 
  hide details  
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