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So there are 2 ways to OC, but which is better? - Page 2

post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

You didn't understand it. Both are exactly the same on a Gigabyte Z77 board. Changing the single multiplier does exactly the same as going to the advance page and manually changing all four numbers to that single value. Turbo speed is actually always on, stock speed never used.

When you see different speeds in Windows, it's actually Windows that reduces the clock speed. The CPU and board do nothing about that by themselves. It's not about turbo. If you want it to stay at highest speed, you have to either disable the power saving features completely in the BIOS (I think it's that EIST "Enhanced Intel Speed Step"), or you have to go into the Windows power profile options and set minimum cpu speed to 100%.

I actually lied about turbo always being on. There's a power limit on the page with the turbo settings. If it goes over that power limit, it will drop to stock speed 3.4ghz or 3.5ghz.

Thanks for the reply. Under what condition does it go over this power limit? Should I raise it to avoid the clock speed from throttling? If so, what's a good number?

Is it called the TDP limit ?
post #12 of 15
I don't know if that's the same limit. You can check what the hardware thinks its current use is in HWINFO or HWMonitor somewhere. There are "package power" and "core power" readings.

If you leave everything on Auto on that page, and instead manage things with that single multiplier from the previous page, it should just work. If you use those four values manually, I've heard you might have to raise it. The max values are 1200W and 300A for those two settings in the BIOS.

My i5-3570k actually never gets up to those 77W that seem to be default, but I've once set the limit to something like 60W as an experiment and it definitely works. It will reduce speed to 3.4ghz for me if I run prime95 or IBT, but not for that Cinebench CPU test. This was at 4.6ghz I think. I don't know if the readings actually change with the overclock speed and voltage or are just a very rough guess. The i7-3770k probably sees different values with its hyperthreading.
post #13 of 15
I have the ud3h also op, its a good motherboard.

Taken from my 3770k overclocking guide here - http://www.overclock.net/t/1392279/info-intel-3570k-3770k-overclocking-tips

To be set before starting overclock

On Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H Motherboard (hopefully the names for voltage settings etc wont be too different across motherboards.)

M.I.T\Advanced Frequency Settings

CPU Clock Ratio - 40
System Memory Multiplier - 16 or change to your stock ram speed determined by 100mhz x value. I.e for 1333mhz ram type 13.33

M.I.T\Advanced Frequency Settings\Channel A Timing Settings

DRAM Timing Selectable - Quick
CAS Latency - 11 or change to your stock ram timings
tRCD - 11 or change to your stock ram timings
tRP - 11 or change to your stock ram timings
tRAS - 11 or change to your stock ram timings

M.I.T\Advanced Voltage Settings\CPU Core Voltage Control

CPU Vcore - 1.070v Stock setting

M.I.T\Advanced Voltage Settings\DRAM Voltage Control

DRAM Voltage - 1.50v or your stock RAM voltage

And thats it! These are the only settings we need to change so far. All we have done is changed the cpu multiplier to 40 to give us an overclocked speed of 4.0Ghz at stock voltage, most if not all cpus should be able to run 4ghz at stock voltage. We have also set the stock ram settings so as to ensure the ram doesnt become overclocked and interrupt getting the cpu overclock stable. Remember to put your own RAM speeds/voltages in at this point in the bios.



Then just test in prime95 if you want to make sure its stable, all you need to change after prime is multiplier then increase cpu vcore until your happy.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

I don't know if that's the same limit. You can check what the hardware thinks its current use is in HWINFO or HWMonitor somewhere. There are "package power" and "core power" readings.

If you leave everything on Auto on that page, and instead manage things with that single multiplier from the previous page, it should just work. If you use those four values manually, I've heard you might have to raise it. The max values are 1200W and 300A for those two settings in the BIOS.

My i5-3570k actually never gets up to those 77W that seem to be default, but I've once set the limit to something like 60W as an experiment and it definitely works. It will reduce speed to 3.4ghz for me if I run prime95 or IBT, but not for that Cinebench CPU test. This was at 4.6ghz I think. I don't know if the readings actually change with the overclock speed and voltage or are just a very rough guess. The i7-3770k probably sees different values with its hyperthreading.

So I am guessing leaving the limit at default of 77 W should be fine, as I have only OC my i5-3570k to 4.2 Ghz. You are saying even at 4.6 Ghz, yours never reach the 77 W, right? Or were you talking about that at stock speed.
Edited by driedupfish - 8/15/13 at 1:03pm
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by driedupfish View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by deepor View Post

I don't know if that's the same limit. You can check what the hardware thinks its current use is in HWINFO or HWMonitor somewhere. There are "package power" and "core power" readings.

If you leave everything on Auto on that page, and instead manage things with that single multiplier from the previous page, it should just work. If you use those four values manually, I've heard you might have to raise it. The max values are 1200W and 300A for those two settings in the BIOS.

My i5-3570k actually never gets up to those 77W that seem to be default, but I've once set the limit to something like 60W as an experiment and it definitely works. It will reduce speed to 3.4ghz for me if I run prime95 or IBT, but not for that Cinebench CPU test. This was at 4.6ghz I think. I don't know if the readings actually change with the overclock speed and voltage or are just a very rough guess. The i7-3770k probably sees different values with its hyperthreading.

So I am guessing leaving the limit at default of 77 W should be fine, as I have only OC my i5-3570k to 4.2 Ghz. You are saying even at 4.6 Ghz, yours never reach the 77 W, right? Or were you talking about that at stock speed.

That was overclocked. I tried to tweak things to never go higher than a certain temperature, but it was a bit of a failure, so I gave up. I never compared with other speeds. You should check it out for yourself. I could imagine those power readings just being a guess built out of percentage of load without actually involving speed and voltage at all. HWINFO seems to have the most sensor readings to look at so I'd recommend that program.

That's the settings from that time:



If you change the 34 at the top to 46 and revert everything else to Auto, it will behave the same.

This here is how to get voltage to dynamically change depending on load and go down for idle:



While I'm posting screenshots, these settings are the most important:



Those three screens were literally the whole overclocking. When it crashed, it always only needed increased vcore voltage for me, nothing else.
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