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Fastest route to a job: WebDev / SoftDev

post #1 of 6
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First of all: Hello smile.gif, sorry for possibility of opening the same thread as many others in the past but i guess there is a little story behind everyone. I don`t want this to be a war between which is better or anything like that, just maybe a small constructive topic which maybe can also help others.

Ok, to put it as simple as i can: i started to learn programming(mostly c++ but didn't make it to pointers or to the hard part to say so) some time ago but because of some health issues i had to cancel almost everything i planned so now i want to go back learning programming but the problem is that i don`t have to much time...I'm 24, i will go to a computer science uni this fall but that`s only for the degree because here in my country/town most of the universities have low lvl students/teachers and you won't end learning too much from them. My question basically is which path will get me a job as fast as possible? Web development or Software development? And no I'm not ridiculous saying that i want a job in a month or something like that, i understand that any choice i will make will take a good amount of time.

I always was a bit nerdy, techy and i learned that I like to code, i don`t necessary have a preference you know? i just want to code, to create something. At first look it seems that web development seems easier and maybe would be easiest and fastest way but with software development seems that you can create more complex apps, you are basically more challenged ?

I think that at 24 it's my last "train" to do something, especially when it's about coding where every start is very hard and every day counts biggrin.gif

So do you think that there is a difference between the two? or the learning time needed for both are roughly the same ? any kind of advice/opinion would really be appreciated!

Sorry it it's a silly topic but i had to ask.Thanks! thumb.gif
Robert
post #2 of 6
I'm sure 24 seems like a big number in your head, but don't act like you don't have time to actually pursue what you want to actually do. I would sit down and figure out what you really want to do, what you want to be, and then go after that, not do something just because it will get you a job fastest but might be something that you only sort of like to do.

Don't forget, at 24 you've still got a very long time till retirement, so take your time thumb.gif

(if you want a real answer, everything is going into the cloud, so web will be the more important development in the future)
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post #3 of 6
The line can blur quite a bit. There is often some pretty heavy duty software behind a web-based front end.
    
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post #4 of 6
Whether you are a web developer or software developer, both require basic knowledge of programming, and the concepts a programmer would use to debug problems will be used in either profession. Think of programming like this, the more languages you are able to use in your coding, the more money you will make. You can start somewhere you feel like it will be easiest to get a job, say php web development, and while working a job learn to code java and c++. The more languages you can freely use will make you more appealing to any employer because you will have a greater ability to design and implement whatever they may need. Being flexible as a programmer is key to making money and landing a job. Even stating on a resume what programming languages you are already familiar using (and then telling them what you plan to learn in the future) can indicate the dedication you have to becoming better at your job. Half the battle of landing a job is showing HR/management where you want to go, how fast, and how much **** your willing to eat to get there.

... and hey, you never know, if you get real good at what your doing. you may not even need to dive into something different. there are plenty of free-lance php developers and java/c++ coders out there making very comfortable livings.

just my $.02
I'm a junior computer science major w/ a minor in finance looking to get into quant trader after the dust settles and I get done with the bachelors degree.

Good luck in your endeavors oc.net friend.

ps- no fear about being 24. its not to late. i have a 47 year old in my classes who wants to a be a programmer, his age doesn't seem to bother him wink.gif

Just make sure this is the road you want to take, if it is, there is plenty of time left for you, and lots & lots of money to be made.
post #5 of 6
There is, I'm afraid, about 100,000x more work out there for managed languages than C++. Java, C#, PL/SQL, etc are the kind of software dev you want to know if you want to be gobbled up by a company as soon as possible.

Web Development is almost always done in a managed language, anyway. No one writes HTML- everyone writes JSP/PHP/ASP/XSL/etc that generates HTML, so you really need to know both if you want to do web development. You probably aren't going to be able to treat the back end of the web app you're developing as a black box, either.
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post #6 of 6
You have plenty of time ahead of you. I was 25 when I started my second degree, in compsci, and thanks to being older I've managed to get much more out of it than from my first one.

I think the best way to benefit from your time at the uni is to focus on completing projects, which you can then include in your portfolio. Whenever you're given an assignment try to come up with an idea for a software/web that you could actually finish and release, and than be able to demonstrate it as an achievement to potential employer. By the time you finish your course you'll find out that everything you've done during the first two years is crap not worth showing to anyone, but you'll learn a lot in the process. Also remember that a single completed project is better than a dozen unfinished ones so think carefully about setting your goals. Your portfolio is also worth more than any degree.

As far as languages go, give yourself some time before you decide to pick one. If you learn programming well enough you'll be able to easily switch between languages as well as between software development and web development (although not necessarily the other way around). I'd suggest learning Python as your first language as it's easy to pick up and can be used for writing many different kinds of applications, including web apps.
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