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Need Help Identifying a Network Rackmount

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Alright the title is pretty vauge because I have absolutely no idea what I'm talking about. Really though!

To start off, I'm a complete network noob, and the extent of my knowledge can only get me as far as using an unmanaged network switch. However I'm a complete sucker for server rackmounts; I've always loved playing around with servers and things of that nature. To make a long story short, I traded a friend some fans for a rackmount that neither of us had any idea what was. When I went to look up what it was that I traded for, it was impossible to understand the vocabulary since I have no background in IT. I've been trying to do some Google searches in an attempt to figure things out myself, and it's just been a disaster. I think I'm more confused now than I was before.

Could anyone perhaps describe to me in simple terms what I traded for? ph34r-smiley.gif

I traded for an Exinda 4800, that much I know, but what does it do, and what can it be used for? Thanks in advance.

post #2 of 9
Looks like a typical WAN accelerator type of box.
A lot of those cache network data and use compression to improve your WAN 'effective bandwidth'.

You probably wouldn't see much of a difference with the unit by itself, but if you had one at each end of the link in say a branch/datacenter type of situation the units could compress data between each other and also do things such as use more simplified headers to reduce network overhead (increasing the payload transfer rate as a result).

Side note, I am also a sucker for this kind of crap.


Edited by beers - 8/17/13 at 5:11pm
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Oh okay I kind of understand what you're saying. Does it work similar to a giant network cache?
post #4 of 9
Basically, with a few other features.
post #5 of 9
That device will offload Internet traffic from multiple client PCs pretty well, but won't do much in a home network environment. Think of it this way - say you worked in a company with 250 desktop computer users, and they all went to the Drudge Report or some other popular site. The first person gets a fresh copy of the page, and the other 249 people get a cached copy of the page. The WAN accelerator is therefore offloading those 249 people from the WAN link, saving precious bandwidth for other things.

The problem when you take it home, is that you're the only user - so everything you request is a one-shot. If you request the same page immediately thereafter, your own browser cache will service the request and it wouldn't be retrieved from the Internet anyhow. If your sister, brother, wife, friend, or other person tried accessing the same page from another PC in the house, they'd then pull the cached copy, so it might save a small amount of traffic in that scenario.

Making matters worse, that thing was one a $20K piece of hardware, but doesn't have much place in a world where primary Internet connections for large companies are often 50-100 Mbps, and the largest license ($20K) for the Exinda was for 20 Mbps.

Greg
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Wow that was incredibly helpful, thank you so much! I'm not really out a whole lot since I traded it for 2 80mm Noctuas. its a nice little "show" piece right now tongue.gif
post #7 of 9
That nice little "show piece" might net you $500 or more on eBay if the license is for a higher amount of bandwidth. When you power it on with a serial console attached to the DB9 port, it should tell you a little about the firmware and license versions. Some companies DO still use these things, as they do a fair job of caching commonly accessed pages.

Greg
post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Oh well nevermind I'll have to look into it on my winter break. Thanks so much this is great news smile.gif
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by hammong View Post

That device will offload Internet traffic from multiple client PCs pretty well, but won't do much in a home network environment. Think of it this way - say you worked in a company with 250 desktop computer users, and they all went to the Drudge Report or some other popular site. The first person gets a fresh copy of the page, and the other 249 people get a cached copy of the page. The WAN accelerator is therefore offloading those 249 people from the WAN link, saving precious bandwidth for other things.

The problem when you take it home, is that you're the only user - so everything you request is a one-shot. If you request the same page immediately thereafter, your own browser cache will service the request and it wouldn't be retrieved from the Internet anyhow. If your sister, brother, wife, friend, or other person tried accessing the same page from another PC in the house, they'd then pull the cached copy, so it might save a small amount of traffic in that scenario.

Making matters worse, that thing was one a $20K piece of hardware, but doesn't have much place in a world where primary Internet connections for large companies are often 50-100 Mbps, and the largest license ($20K) for the Exinda was for 20 Mbps.

Greg

This is not correct, what Hammong is referring to is a Web Cache, which is typically WebFlow or BlueCoat devices.
Quote:
Originally Posted by beers View Post

Looks like a typical WAN accelerator type of box.
A lot of those cache network data and use compression to improve your WAN 'effective bandwidth'.

You probably wouldn't see much of a difference with the unit by itself, but if you had one at each end of the link in say a branch/datacenter type of situation the units could compress data between each other and also do things such as use more simplified headers to reduce network overhead (increasing the payload transfer rate as a result).

Side note, I am also a sucker for this kind of crap.


Beers is pretty much dead on here. This is a full on WAN Acceleration device, the problem is you have to have at minimum 2 of these for it to work. These are will help with bandwidth like both Hammong and Beers have stated. What it does it it strips off the data that is most common traveling between a remote site and the main site and compresses it. Basically it treats a TCP session differently as it removes some of the packets in order to speed up performance. We used this technology when I worked at STATE and DoD to send data back and forth to foreign posts.
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The Raven
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RAMHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
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