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HDD , SSD New System Builder Questions

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I am building a new PC ............... biggrin.gif

So i decided to use the ISRT and many other things .. but i faced many questions so i am asking them here .................
it has been many years since i last set up my own system from scratch ............ and many things changed too .............. so please help me guys .

HDD 1 : WD Blue 1 TB (OS's + Large Softwares)
HDD 2: Seagate 2 TB (Data)
SSD : (still haven't bought , will buy one soon) 120 / 128 gb

1.MBR & GPT:
The OS that i will be using is in #2

a)Which one should i use MBR?
I figured GPT is Latest and has advantages over MBR ........... like It can self heal corrupted records or something like that ........... So Please tell me about it

b)If i use XP 32bit SP3 will i be able to use the GPT formatted partition ?

2.OS i want to use:
Till now i used XP SP3 32bit

But Now i am going to use Win 7 64bit
with multi boot options with
XP 64 bit
win 8 64 bit
Fedora
ubuntu
MacOSX (Will try a hackintosh)

a)Tell me how to make a multi boot pc?
(till now i did multi windows ........... like xp , 2000 , 7 only)

b)My primary most used OS - win 7 in SSD
Other OS in WD Blue
with half SSD used for isrt
and the other half fr the Primary OS
So how to do it ?

3.Hdd Platter:
i heard that less the number of platters in a hdd , lesser the probability of corruption
So can you guys tell me , how many platters do my Hdds have
Western Digital Blue 1 TB Sata 3
Seagate 2TB Sata 3

4.Intel ISRT :
How to use my SSD
Half as SSD Cache
& Other Half as System Drive

5.(I will add questions as i face them here)
post #2 of 7
A little clarification on multiboot.

There is only one boot drive, no matter where you put the Windows files. The computer will read the boot sector on that drive (the boot drive, usually the drive on the first SATA port) to boot.

In order to boot a non Microsoft OS, you'll have to use a third party boot loader and have it call both the non MS OS(s) and Windows.

And you don't want to install a drive, put an OS on it, then remove that drive, install another and put a different OS on that drive. While that can be done and will work, it's just a really bad PITA to use.
Edited by billbartuska - 8/18/13 at 9:22am
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Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
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post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

A little clarification on multiboot.

There is only one boot drive, no matter where you put the Windows files. The computer will read the boot sector on that drive (the boot drive, usually the drive on the first SATA port) to boot.

In order to boot a non Microsoft OS, you'll have to use a third party boot loader and have it call both the non MS OS(s) and Windows.

And you don't want to install a drive, put an OS on it, then remove that drive, install another and put a different OS on that drive. While that can be done and will work, it's just a really bad PITA to use.

I will mostly use my primary OS

i want Linux for College Programming related work
XP for Backward Compatibilty and i love XP
MacOS X just for the fun of it

...
i wont be jumping from OS to OS .

And why should i remove that drive before install another OS on another drive ................. can't i just select the Path within the installation
Please tell me in detail about your last point !

thumb.gif
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Dupe Post
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by John117 View Post


...
i wont be jumping from OS to OS .

And why should i remove that drive before install another OS on another drive ................. can't i just select the Path within the installation NO!
Please tell me in detail about your last point !

thumb.gif

A little about post up, boot up, and OS installs:

When you install an OS (any OS on any computer) the install program writes a snippet of code (actually a tiny 256 bit program) to the first sector of drive 0 which is almost always the drive connected to the first SATA port.

From then on when the computer posts, the BIOS copies that tiny program from the boot sector into memory and it executes. That program tells the BIOS where the boot loader program is located and then runs the boot loader. The boot loader either starts (boots) the OS , or, in a multi boot setup, displays a splash screen that gives you a choice of which OSs to boot up.

If you stop and think about it, the above is pretty much the only way a computer could be made to boot. Something, somehow has to get the boot process started and the above is a universally accepted way for all OSs.

So, you see that no matter where you put the actual Windows files (ie the installed to drive/partition) the SATA 1 drive (Drive 0 in disk manager) is ALWAYS the boot drive because that's where the BIOS looks for the boot sector.

You can "trick" the BIOS by, after a successful install, you remove that drive and substitute another, and then install an OS onto that one too. Then, with both drives plugged in you can change OSs by rebooting, entering the BIOS, and changing the boot drive in the BIOS and restarting. Some BIOSs even give you a key press at boot up to choose the boot drive (easier than having to make changes in the BIOS).

There are many, non-obvious, unintended consequences to the above trick (besides having to enter the BIOS to change OSs). For example, each OS will have it's own My Documents folder, it's own User Account Controls, and Programs (X86) folder. So it becomes a mess trying to keep track of security, documents and programs. Also, prior to Vista, it was a simple task to edit the boot loader (you could do it in notepad!). Since Vista, there is a completely different, much more complex boot loader that has it's own editing program (BCDEdit, or EasyBCD for novices).

MS has done an excellent job facilitating multiboot. Just install the OSs i the order MS released them, (ie XP then Win7) and everything is taken care of for you automatically.

For multi booting with windows combined with non windows installs you need a third party boot loader. Since Bill Gates has no idea (nor cares) what Linus Torvalds is doing.

Hope that helps....
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Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
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post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billbartuska View Post

A little about post up, boot up, and OS installs:

When you install an OS (any OS on any computer) the install program writes a snippet of code (actually a tiny 256 bit program) to the first sector of drive 0 which is almost always the drive connected to the first SATA port.

From then on when the computer posts, the BIOS copies that tiny program from the boot sector into memory and it executes. That program tells the BIOS where the boot loader program is located and then runs the boot loader. The boot loader either starts (boots) the OS , or, in a multi boot setup, displays a splash screen that gives you a choice of which OSs to boot up.

If you stop and think about it, the above is pretty much the only way a computer could be made to boot. Something, somehow has to get the boot process started and the above is a universally accepted way for all OSs.

So, you see that no matter where you put the actual Windows files (ie the installed to drive/partition) the SATA 1 drive (Drive 0 in disk manager) is ALWAYS the boot drive because that's where the BIOS looks for the boot sector.

You can "trick" the BIOS by, after a successful install, you remove that drive and substitute another, and then install an OS onto that one too. Then, with both drives plugged in you can change OSs by rebooting, entering the BIOS, and changing the boot drive in the BIOS and restarting. Some BIOSs even give you a key press at boot up to choose the boot drive (easier than having to make changes in the BIOS).

There are many, non-obvious, unintended consequences to the above trick (besides having to enter the BIOS to change OSs). For example, each OS will have it's own My Documents folder, it's own User Account Controls, and Programs (X86) folder. So it becomes a mess trying to keep track of security, documents and programs. Also, prior to Vista, it was a simple task to edit the boot loader (you could do it in notepad!). Since Vista, there is a completely different, much more complex boot loader that has it's own editing program (BCDEdit, or EasyBCD for novices).

MS has done an excellent job facilitating multiboot. Just install the OSs i the order MS released them, (ie XP then Win7) and everything is taken care of for you automatically.

For multi booting with windows combined with non windows installs you need a third party boot loader. Since Bill Gates has no idea (nor cares) what Linus Torvalds is doing.

Hope that helps....

Ok ............. I get .............. the PITA part

SO When i install many OS i should do it in 1 Physical HDD , not more than 1
So
Case 1
Multi boot : XP, 7 ,8
All in one HDD

Case 2
XP , 7 , ubuntu
Here too all in one HDD

...................................................................................
I heard something called Grubloader , which allows you to select OS before boot ................. is it applicable only when All the OS is installed in 1 physical HDD ?

And please answer my other questions
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by John117 View Post

Ok ............. I get .............. the PITA part

SO When i install many OS i should do it in 1 Physical HDD , not more than 1
So
Case 1
Multi boot : XP, 7 ,8
All in one HDD

Case 2
XP , 7 , ubuntu
Here too all in one HDD

...................................................................................
I heard something called Grubloader , which allows you to select OS before boot ................. is it applicable only when All the OS is installed in 1 physical HDD ?

And please answer my other questions

AAARRRGGGG!!!

Well, yes and no, as to case 1 and 2. It's a fine point, but:
You can install to any Drive or Partition that you want to. It doesn't matter in the slightest.
What you "Install to" is just where the Windows Install program puts the Windows files.
It's just that the SATA 1 Drive (Drive 0 in disk manager) will be the boot drive and that's where the BIOS will look for the boot sector.

For example:
Say you have 2 HDDs,
Drive 1 connected to the SATA 1 port, and this drive has two partitions, Partition A and Partition B
Drive 2 connected to the SATA 2 port, and is all one partition.

Say you install Windows XP to the first Partition (A) on Drive 1
Then I install Win 7 to the second Partition (B) on Drive 1
Then install Win 8 to Drive 2

Drive 1 will get the boot sector, and boot loader for Win XP, then each subsequent installation will modify the boot loader to include that new OS, Win7 located on Partition2, and then Win 8 located on Drive 2.



Now, if you remove Drive 2, the boot loader on Partition A of drive 1 will still be able to boot Win XP and Win 7, but not Win 8.

If you instead remove Drive 1 nothing will boot because the boot sector isn't there for the BIOS to read. There will be no way to boot Win 8 because there's no boot sector/boot loader on drive 2. (actually there is a boot sector, but the OS installs only modify the one on Drive 0

As for Grubloader, I have no idea. Whenever I need linux i just use a Knopix bootable CD.

Also be sure you have backups and that you actually try a restore of them before you start playing around with boot loaders.
You will FUBAR disks and destroy data.
Edited by billbartuska - 8/19/13 at 1:21pm
My System
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CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
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My System
(15 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX6300 Black M5A99X EVO R2.0 Nvidia GTS450 Team Vulcan PC3 12800 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Samsung 840 PRO Asus DRW-1608P (x2) Custom Water Cooling Win7 (Ult), Win 8.1 & Win Server 2012 R2 
MonitorKeyboardPowerCase
2 X Samsung 915N Ducky Shine III, Blue Cherry/Blue LEDs PCP&C 1kw Lian Li PC-71 (W/Window) 
MouseAudio
Logiteck G400s none 
  hide details  
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