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Custom wood cube w/ dual loop [COMPLETED] - Page 2

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
dmfree88,
I am woefully outdated, hence my design goal to make the case easy for future upgrades. My motherboard is an EVGA 790i Digital, and my processor is an Intel Q9550 (quad core, 2.83 GHz). On the plus side, I have a decent video card, a Sapphire 7870 2 GB, which is PCI 3.0 and ready for the new motherboard.

I also run Windows off a dedicated 80-gb solid state drive, and I have a separate 128 GB solid state drive for applications. I mounted those in the HTPC case near the front of the power supply, as they didn't stick out as much as the hard drives.

As promised, additional pics as I am close to completion:

Installed the HTPC case with the motherboard and connected the loops. Unfortunately, I could not connect the graphics card loop because the EK FC7870 full coverage water block I purchased does not fit the Sapphire 7870 card. Unfortunately, I relied on EK's website, which shows my Sapphire card as the ONLY 7870 card where they did a physical match (as opposed to visual), so I bought both with confidence 2 months ago and never bothered to actually verify it myself. Apparently, Sapphire changed from the reference design before I bought my card, so I'll have to come up with a plan B to resolve this. I'll spare everyone the colorful language my poor dogs had to listen to when I figured this out.

Anyway, onto the pics. First, the installed HTPC case:



A couple of notes from the picture above: First, what looks like tape on the wood is actually nylon strips. These are to provide a slick surface for the top cover to slide on and off the case. I've used it to repair sticky wood-on-wood drawers on old furniture in the past, and it works great. If you want any for your project, you can find it at Woodcraft.

Second, you will notice the brace that I installed between the reservoirs. This was needed for two purposes - I needed a solid surface to support the front trim, since that is not fixed to the reservoirs (they were just mounted flush to the front trim), and I needed some support for the case top (hence the tape on top).

Third, I added some liquid to the processor/mobo. I've always used a mix of distilled water and 10% coolant (ethylene glycol), but I only have green, which I'm not sure works with my case color, but more on that later.

Fourth, I need to find a solution to hold the tubes coming from below (especially the rear ones) onto the side of the case. I don't really care for them flopping about. Suggestions appreciated...

I need to clean up the wires when I have time, but I took this picture to show how I got the power and SATA cables down to the lower section. I removed the center HDD cage from the HTPC case, as it was useless anyway, and drilled a 1" hole through the bottom of the HTPC case and the plywood base of the HTPC case. I added a simple plastic grommet to keep the sharp metal from cutting into the cables, and all of it comes out a couple of inches above the HDD cage in the lower section.



Here is a picture of the top showing the cover being slid into place along the nylon rails. BTW, I noticed in this picture that in my haste to finish, I missed a bit of stain between the reservoirs and the center brace. I'll need to touch that up:



Installing the HDD cage in the front. As I wrote earlier, it is very accessible. Undo the thumbscrew from below, and it pops right out. After taking the pic, I noticed the mesh was dusty, so that's been clean up since then.



HDD cage fully installed (and the dusty mesh cleaned up). Nice flush fit all the way around, and hopefully it doesn't look like a removable part:



Another angle of the HDD cage, with a view of the side radiators as well:



Full reveal of the front. I was running a test of the loop, and unplugged power to the left-side pump, but forgot to turn off power to the radiator fans, so the left reservoir fogged up a bit during the test.



Picture with the HTPC door open. I don't have a lot of fancy front devices - just a DVD RW drive and a few built-in connectors:



A view of the side of the case, showing the radiator grill (holding the radiator by the black screws):



A view from the back. I need to get some kind of latch for for the top, otherwise it just freely slides on and off. Also, note that I added a mesh cover for the back opening of lower section, and I can adjust the speed controls of the pumps without removing the mesh by using a small screwdriver. One nice surprise was the amount of area I had between the back of the case and the back of the HTPC case, so connections won't hit the back wall. I actually didn't intend that - I just made the case long enough for the radiators, and the amount of space I needed was longer than the HTPC case was deep.



I posted this close-up of the HTPC case against the stain for CaptainZombie, who requested a pic of the contrast:



comments appreciated. One week turnaround (actually longer considering I needed to wait for parts before starting construction), and I spent around $200, half of which was the HTPC case, although that doesn't include the water cooling parts. However, I had a lot of materials, including the trim boards, stain, and poly, left over from the construction of my desk. If I had to build it from scratch with no materials, it likely would have cost around $350-400.
post #12 of 17
Love it thumb.gif
post #13 of 17
T
Quote:
Originally Posted by atxgo View Post

dmfree88,
I am woefully outdated, hence my design goal to make the case easy for future upgrades. My motherboard is an EVGA 790i Digital, and my processor is an Intel Q9550 (quad core, 2.83 GHz). On the plus side, I have a decent video card, a Sapphire 7870 2 GB, which is PCI 3.0 and ready for the new motherboard.

I also run Windows off a dedicated 80-gb solid state drive, and I have a separate 128 GB solid state drive for applications. I mounted those in the HTPC case near the front of the power supply, as they didn't stick out as much as the hard drives.

As promised, additional pics as I am close to completion:

Installed the HTPC case with the motherboard and connected the loops. Unfortunately, I could not connect the graphics card loop because the EK FC7870 full coverage water block I purchased does not fit the Sapphire 7870 card. Unfortunately, I relied on EK's website, which shows my Sapphire card as the ONLY 7870 card where they did a physical match (as opposed to visual), so I bought both with confidence 2 months ago and never bothered to actually verify it myself. Apparently, Sapphire changed from the reference design before I bought my card, so I'll have to come up with a plan B to resolve this. I'll spare everyone the colorful language my poor dogs had to listen to when I figured this out.

Anyway, onto the pics. First, the installed HTPC case:



A couple of notes from the picture above: First, what looks like tape on the wood is actually nylon strips. These are to provide a slick surface for the top cover to slide on and off the case. I've used it to repair sticky wood-on-wood drawers on old furniture in the past, and it works great. If you want any for your project, you can find it at Woodcraft.

Second, you will notice the brace that I installed between the reservoirs. This was needed for two purposes - I needed a solid surface to support the front trim, since that is not fixed to the reservoirs (they were just mounted flush to the front trim), and I needed some support for the case top (hence the tape on top).

Third, I added some liquid to the processor/mobo. I've always used a mix of distilled water and 10% coolant (ethylene glycol), but I only have green, which I'm not sure works with my case color, but more on that later.

Fourth, I need to find a solution to hold the tubes coming from below (especially the rear ones) onto the side of the case. I don't really care for them flopping about. Suggestions appreciated...

I need to clean up the wires when I have time, but I took this picture to show how I got the power and SATA cables down to the lower section. I removed the center HDD cage from the HTPC case, as it was useless anyway, and drilled a 1" hole through the bottom of the HTPC case and the plywood base of the HTPC case. I added a simple plastic grommet to keep the sharp metal from cutting into the cables, and all of it comes out a couple of inches above the HDD cage in the lower section.



Here is a picture of the top showing the cover being slid into place along the nylon rails. BTW, I noticed in this picture that in my haste to finish, I missed a bit of stain between the reservoirs and the center brace. I'll need to touch that up:



Installing the HDD cage in the front. As I wrote earlier, it is very accessible. Undo the thumbscrew from below, and it pops right out. After taking the pic, I noticed the mesh was dusty, so that's been clean up since then.



HDD cage fully installed (and the dusty mesh cleaned up). Nice flush fit all the way around, and hopefully it doesn't look like a removable part:



Another angle of the HDD cage, with a view of the side radiators as well:



Full reveal of the front. I was running a test of the loop, and unplugged power to the left-side pump, but forgot to turn off power to the radiator fans, so the left reservoir fogged up a bit during the test.



Picture with the HTPC door open. I don't have a lot of fancy front devices - just a DVD RW drive and a few built-in connectors:



A view of the side of the case, showing the radiator grill (holding the radiator by the black screws):



A view from the back. I need to get some kind of latch for for the top, otherwise it just freely slides on and off. Also, note that I added a mesh cover for the back opening of lower section, and I can adjust the speed controls of the pumps without removing the mesh by using a small screwdriver. One nice surprise was the amount of area I had between the back of the case and the back of the HTPC case, so connections won't hit the back wall. I actually didn't intend that - I just made the case long enough for the radiators, and the amount of space I needed was longer than the HTPC case was deep.



I posted this close-up of the HTPC case against the stain for CaptainZombie, who requested a pic of the contrast:



comments appreciated. One week turnaround (actually longer considering I needed to wait for parts before starting construction), and I spent around $200, half of which was the HTPC case, although that doesn't include the water cooling parts. However, I had a lot of materials, including the trim boards, stain, and poly, left over from the construction of my desk. If I had to build it from scratch with no materials, it likely would have cost around $350-400.

Thanks that looks quite nice. I was considering building a HTPC out of wood. I like how you incorporated the case with the cabinet.
post #14 of 17
yeah thats very sweet. Hope to see you put something beekcake in it and really push the envelope tongue.gif. You are sparking future ideas for many! thumb.gif very sweet!
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Intel Overclocker
(12 items)
 
Media PC
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 4790k Delidded + Lapped ASRock Z97 Extreme4 MSI Twin Frozr GTX 660  Corsair Vengeance Pro 2400mhz DDR3 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
OCZ Deneva 2 R series 400GB SSD WD Green 4TB HDD Asus DRW-24B1ST Phanteks PH-TC14PE_RD 
OSPowerCaseMouse
Windows 10 Seasonic 650w M12II Phanteks Enthoo Pro M with Acrylic side Cobra e-blue 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
intel core 2 quad q8200 Dell studio stock Dell studio Stock Corsair Force 3 SSD 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
External powered Seagate expansion desk Dell studio stock Stock Windows 10 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 GA-990FXA-UD5 MSI 7870 Hawk Edition Gskill 1600 2x4 GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Corsair Force Series 3 22x Samsung w/ lightscribe dvd/cd burner Noctua NH-D14 Win 7 pro x64 
MonitorPowerCase
Acer x173w Seasonic M12II 650watt Semi-Modular PSU Apevia x-dreamer4 (with side window and red) 
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post #15 of 17
Great work. I love wood builds, as that's primarily what I do as well. I really like the hard drive cage; well camouflaged
post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for the comments.

I ran the loop through a test overnight, and no leaks, so I set it up for operation. Here is a picture of the new case in its home under the desk. Just to the left of the desk, partially hidden is my UPS (APC 1500 RS). I organized the wire spaghetti by using a combination of cable sleeves and j-channel under the desk.



Desktop items include a 23" widescreen monitor and two 19" monitors. Keyboard is a Logitech G15, and the mouse is a Microsoft game mouse. Left of the keyboard is a 3DConnexion controller, which is indispensable for 3D design work, but also great for just scrolling as alternative to a wheel mouse. Near the 3DConnexion is a usb hub and volume control for the Logitech speakers.

I didn't like the green liquid originally, but it is growing on me. Now if I can just resolve my graphics card issue, I can make both loops operational.
post #17 of 17
only problem with green liquid is you cant tell if your getting algae build up... wait is that a bad thing? LOL.

Very perdy though. Really spot on, goes great with the room and the desk. If I were you I wouldn't be able to stop smiling everytime i walked into that room lol. Great job tho really! very nice
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Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
OCZ Deneva 2 R series 400GB SSD WD Green 4TB HDD Asus DRW-24B1ST Phanteks PH-TC14PE_RD 
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Windows 10 Seasonic 650w M12II Phanteks Enthoo Pro M with Acrylic side Cobra e-blue 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
intel core 2 quad q8200 Dell studio stock Dell studio Stock Corsair Force 3 SSD 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
External powered Seagate expansion desk Dell studio stock Stock Windows 10 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 GA-990FXA-UD5 MSI 7870 Hawk Edition Gskill 1600 2x4 GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Corsair Force Series 3 22x Samsung w/ lightscribe dvd/cd burner Noctua NH-D14 Win 7 pro x64 
MonitorPowerCase
Acer x173w Seasonic M12II 650watt Semi-Modular PSU Apevia x-dreamer4 (with side window and red) 
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Intel Overclocker
(12 items)
 
Media PC
(8 items)
 
 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7 4790k Delidded + Lapped ASRock Z97 Extreme4 MSI Twin Frozr GTX 660  Corsair Vengeance Pro 2400mhz DDR3 
Hard DriveHard DriveOptical DriveCooling
OCZ Deneva 2 R series 400GB SSD WD Green 4TB HDD Asus DRW-24B1ST Phanteks PH-TC14PE_RD 
OSPowerCaseMouse
Windows 10 Seasonic 650w M12II Phanteks Enthoo Pro M with Acrylic side Cobra e-blue 
CPUMotherboardRAMHard Drive
intel core 2 quad q8200 Dell studio stock Dell studio Stock Corsair Force 3 SSD 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
External powered Seagate expansion desk Dell studio stock Stock Windows 10 
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
FX-8350 GA-990FXA-UD5 MSI 7870 Hawk Edition Gskill 1600 2x4 GB 
Hard DriveOptical DriveCoolingOS
Corsair Force Series 3 22x Samsung w/ lightscribe dvd/cd burner Noctua NH-D14 Win 7 pro x64 
MonitorPowerCase
Acer x173w Seasonic M12II 650watt Semi-Modular PSU Apevia x-dreamer4 (with side window and red) 
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