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post #781 of 870
Hello guys,

I have a EVGA Supernova 1000 P2 Power Supply which I wanna do a custom sleeving on, I just wanna know is there any way to get rid of the double wires that goes into a single connector on the 24 pin connector?
    
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post #782 of 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by I-Siamak-I View Post

Hello guys,

I have a EVGA Supernova 1000 P2 Power Supply which I wanna do a custom sleeving on, I just wanna know is there any way to get rid of the double wires that goes into a single connector on the 24 pin connector?

No, Double wires are required. The only way around it is to solder three wires together at some point from Motherboard to PSU.
post #783 of 870
I couldn't find a reliable diagram for the Corsair AX760/860 so I picked up a cheap circuit tester and made one using a template I found on here. Hope this can help someone out.

post #784 of 870
Quick question : I have bought a multimeter, which I plan to use to do the pin outs diagram.

For the from/to diagram for the housings wiring, I just need the continuity mode, no questions there

However, if I want to test with the PSU running to know what type of voltage is supplied by which wire : do you confirm there is no harm for the PSU/the multimeter/myself if for instance I put the two multimeter pins on 2 different 12V connector pins ?

Another example : a "molex" mate'n lock 4 pin has 12v, GND, GND, 5V : what happens if I put the multimeter in 12v and 5v ?
If I remember my physics / "technology" courses, the multimeter measures a difference of potential, so I should read 7 or -7, is that correct ?
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post #785 of 870
i think you got the pinout all wrong. 17 is never empty, 20 is always empty.
did you get the cable working?
do you have a newer updated version of this pinout?
post #786 of 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZestyChicken View Post

So I'm working on developing the pin out for a Thermaltake Toughpower Grand RGB 850W Gold Full Modular. Basically I just followed the wires and based it on the standard 24 pin mapping.

Here's my question. The pin 17 on the motherboard connector is empty. This is just a ground. For cosmetic reasons, I want to fill this pin. Can I just route it to Pin 14 on PSU1 (18 pin) which is currently one of two pins fed from pin 24 on the motherboard connector. Bottom line - isn't a ground a ground?

Here's what I have so far (THIS IS UNTESTED AND IS A WORK-IN-PROCESS - ONLY POSTED TO GET INPUT FROM THE FORUM):

MOTHERBOARD
Pin Name
1 +3.3V
2 +3.3V
3 COM Ground
4 +5V
5 COM Ground
6 +5V
7 COM Ground
8 PWR_ON Power Good
9 +5V Standby
10 +12V1
11 +12V1
12 +3.3V
13 +3.3V
14 -12V
15 COM Ground
16 PS_ON# Power Supply On
17 COM Ground **************this pin is empty on the Thermaltake PSU cable************
18 COM Ground
19 COM Ground
20 NC -5 VDC
21 +5V
22 +5V
23 +5V
24 COM Ground

PSU 1 (18 pin)
Pin MB Pin Name
1 9 +5V Standby
2 9 +5V Standby
3 7 COM Ground
4 16 PS_ON# Power Supply On
5 15 COM Ground
6 22 +5V
7 21 +5V
8 23 +5V
9 13 +3.3V
10 12 +3.3V
11 11 +12V1
12 1 +3.3V
13 24 COM Ground
14 24 COM Ground
15 5 COM Ground
16 14 -12V
17 4 +5V
18 19 COM Ground

PSU 2 (10 pin)
Pin MB Pin Name
1 8 PWR_ON Power Good
2 8 PWR_ON Power Good
3 2 +3.3V
4 3 COM Ground
5 3 COM Ground
6 20 NC -5 VDC
7 10 +12V1
8 10 +12V1
9 18 COM Ground
10 6 +5V

i think you got the pinout all wrong. 17 is never empty, 20 is always empty.
did you get the cable working?
do you have a newer updated version of this pinout?
post #787 of 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jubijub View Post

Quick question : I have bought a multimeter, which I plan to use to do the pin outs diagram.

For the from/to diagram for the housings wiring, I just need the continuity mode, no questions there

However, if I want to test with the PSU running to know what type of voltage is supplied by which wire : do you confirm there is no harm for the PSU/the multimeter/myself if for instance I put the two multimeter pins on 2 different 12V connector pins ?

Another example : a "molex" mate'n lock 4 pin has 12v, GND, GND, 5V : what happens if I put the multimeter in 12v and 5v ?
If I remember my physics / "technology" courses, the multimeter measures a difference of potential, so I should read 7 or -7, is that correct ?

I read 7 volts on my multimeter when i connect the black (ground) test probe to the 5 volt and the red(positiv) test probe to the 12 volt on the 4 pin molex connector
post #788 of 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jubijub View Post

Quick question : I have bought a multimeter, which I plan to use to do the pin outs diagram.

For the from/to diagram for the housings wiring, I just need the continuity mode, no questions there

However, if I want to test with the PSU running to know what type of voltage is supplied by which wire : do you confirm there is no harm for the PSU/the multimeter/myself if for instance I put the two multimeter pins on 2 different 12V connector pins ?

Another example : a "molex" mate'n lock 4 pin has 12v, GND, GND, 5V : what happens if I put the multimeter in 12v and 5v ?
If I remember my physics / "technology" courses, the multimeter measures a difference of potential, so I should read 7 or -7, is that correct ?

First, just work safely. It's really easy to get seriously hurt if you don't know what you're doing when working with the sort of currents a PSU can put out, even if they're DC. It's surprising how many how-to sites and videos don't emphasize that enough; sometimes it seems like we've been using power supplies for so long they've become second nature, making me wonder if some us haven't become complacent about the safety aspects.

As for your questions about measuring voltage across the two live points used in your example, I think you're asking just in case you do so by accident or come across an incorrectly wired cable, but correct me if I'm mistaken. As long as your multimeter is set to measure (e.g., dc voltage) and you're not touching either of the metal parts on the test leads directly, no harm should come to you, the power supply, or the multimeter. That said, the difference noted above (12-5 = 7) by Daggi is similar to what's called a differential measurement, which has its purposes in things like (e.g.) data acquisition. To measure these two voltages properly, you need a ground reference, and you need to measure one voltage at a time.

You might find the following link interesting, though it doesn't go into detail about how to use a multimeter:

How To Measure Voltage

Lastly, the proper to check the voltage outputs of your psu is under load, which can be accomplished by hooking it up in your system and turning it on. It helps to first use one of those psu idiot checkers and ensure your wiring/cabling is correct, if you don't want to blow things up.

Again, be safe (and have fun)!
Edited by iamjanco - 5/27/17 at 9:55am
post #789 of 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daggi View Post

I read 7 volts on my multimeter when i connect the black (ground) test probe to the 5 volt and the red(positiv) test probe to the 12 volt on the 4 pin molex connector
Thanks, this is exactly what I wanted to know

Quote:
Originally Posted by iamjanco View Post

First, just work safely. It's really easy to get seriously hurt if you don't know what you're doing when working with the sort of currents a PSU can put out, even if they're DC. It's surprising how many how-to sites and videos don't emphasize that enough; sometimes it seems like we've been using power supplies for so long they've become second nature, making me wonder if some us haven't become complacent about the safety aspects.

As for your questions about measuring voltage across the two live points used in your example, I think you're asking just in case you do so by accident or come across an incorrectly wired cable, but correct me if I'm mistaken. As long as your multimeter is set to measure (e.g., dc voltage) and you're not touching either of the metal parts on the test leads directly, no harm should come to you, the power supply, or the multimeter. That said, the difference noted above (12-5 = 7) by Daggi is similar to what's called a differential measurement, which has its purposes in things like (e.g.) data acquisition. To measure these two voltages properly, you need a ground reference, and you need to measure one voltage at a time.

You might find the following link interesting, though it doesn't go into detail about how to use a multimeter:

How To Measure Voltage

Lastly, the proper to check the voltage outputs of your psu is under load, which can be accomplished by hooking it up in your system and turning it on. It helps to first use one of those psu idiot checkers and ensure your wiring/cabling is correct, if you don't want to blow things up.

Again, be safe (and have fun)!
Precisely, I am trying to be cautious smile.gif

I've seen a couple of vidz about voltage measurement, my question was exactly about differential measurement.
If you start from a known pin out then places where to find ground are obvious, my question was more out of curiosity: what if you don't know where the ground is ?
Daggi's answer shows there is no problem : you will simply get the potential difference between the two pins, which will give an odd value if the COM plug is not on a ground pin.

To build the cables though, all I need is continuity testing really, which is done unplugged
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Jubi-PC
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post #790 of 870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jubijub View Post

If you start from a known pin out then places where to find ground are obvious, my question was more out of curiosity: what if you don't know where the ground is ?

That's a fairly easy one to answer... most encased electrical components like power supplies, audio components, car engine electronics, etc., use their chassis as a common ground. If you ohm out a wiring connection to such a chassis and it reads 0 ohms, in all likelihood you've probably found a ground connection you can use (or one that shouldn't be there). There are exceptions to that of course (e.g., like checking continuity through a path that contains a diode imposing very little to no resistance when proper polarity with respect to the multimeter leads is observed),
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