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Overclocking monitor pass 144hz safe? - Page 3

post #21 of 24
I enjoy marks answers
Edited by Miller31 - 8/24/13 at 7:46pm
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartan F8 View Post

The human eye does not see in HZ. Many people with good sleep and some caffeine can likely see a difference between 240hz and 480hz if it is at fast motion. If your assumption was true having lightboost would be a waste of time and no one would see any gains from it.

So yeah big difference between 85hz and 144hz at least for me and anyone i have shown. A very good place to see this is the UFO frame test site here http://www.testufo.com/#test=framerates

neato i'm gonna have to try that on CRTs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cavi Mike View Post

The image stays on the screen for a moment with CRT's - it blends the previous frame with the next. It wasn't necessary for higher framerates back in those days.

I think that is probably PART of the reason they still kick ass for low resolution games, ie why they look better for older 2d games.

All i know for sure is that @ 85hz pair with my GTX480 Far Cry 3 Blood Dragon is smoother than silk.
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Chris-PC
(17 items)
 
Core 2 Haf
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Acer 5920G
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post #23 of 24
It is probably frame dropping anyway you're better of getting or fabricating a lightboost kind of setup.
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cavi Mike View Post

The image stays on the screen for a moment with CRT's - it blends the previous frame with the next.
Not quite accurate.
See High Speed Video of CRT versus LCD. The CRT image does faintly blend into the next, but that isn't why CRT's have good motion clarity. The motion clarity of a CRT is because the image fades away so quickly. Also, shorter-persistence CRT's (less blending into next frame) have less motion blur than longer-persistence CRT's (blends more into next frame)

But, yes, CRT's does look a lot better for at low resolutions than LCD's because of CRT's natural antialiasing and lack of native resolution / lack of scaling degradation.
Quote:
It wasn't necessary for higher framerates back in those days.
That part is correct.

The science show that motion blur is dictated by the LENGTH of the visible frame.
Reducing motion blur is done by shortening the refreshes.
There are two main ways to shorten the refreshes:
1. Black gaps between refreshes (briefer flickers, like CRT flicker, plasma flicker, LightBoost flicker)
2. OR adding more Hz (more refreshes)

LightBoost still requires high framerates, only because LightBoost is like owning a CRT that only strobes at 100-120Hz. That was a vendor decision, because it was originally designed for 3D Vision at 50/50Hz or 60/60Hz per eye, but also had an intentional secondary motion blur reduction benefit, too. (See LightBoost FAQ). LightBoost would benefit 60Hz if the hardware was able to strobe at only 60Hz. (You can also use software-based black frame insertion in conjunction with LightBoost, to block out every other strobe -- some compiles of MAME emulator can do this -- www.blurbusters.com/mame for the "60Hz LightBoost" effect.)
Edited by mdrejhon - 8/25/13 at 3:51pm
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