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Watercooling my MSI GTX770s

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 
I had a post earlier about my 770s that were along the same lines, but regarded more my temps versus this loop, so sorry for the semi repost. D:

Well, I've decided at the beginning of the year, I'm most likely going to be water cooling. I've picked out everything, but I'm hesitant for one reason. VRM and etc cooling. I've posted some pictures of what my card looks like without the heatsink attached, and I wanted some feedback of what I should do before I go to watercooling, or if I should just wait until my next build and buy some references cards to put some blocks on. (I don't want to wait 2-4 years. :/ )

Here's how I want to set it up, if anyone feels that they could give suggestions on what a better set up would be, I would gladly appreciate it. Monsoon Series 2 Premium with a D5 pump (Pump/Res combo) to a XSPC EK240 up top, to CPU block, to XSPC EX140, to GFX cards, to XSPC EX360, back to Pump/Res combo. I like this set up because it allows me to maximise cooling in my noobish eyes. I realize that this might be overkill for my setup, but I just like the idea, and am willing to spend the money on it. I feel like this would be the best without going for rad boxes etc for my case, and with minimal modifications to my case. I realize it will be an extremely tight fit, but I've seen it done to my case. I might change out the 140MM rad for a 120 purely because 120MM fans have better static pressure. I'd be using Noctua A14 PWM on the 140MM rad, because that's what I currently have on my H110.

I'm currently fine with my temps, although I'd rather my top card run a little cooler. 36C on the top and 24-25C on the bottom card at idle. Load on BF3 I hit about 65C max on top card. That's with everything maxed and running a 144HZ monitor with V-sync off Also, my top card runs a bit hotter because I have two 1080P monitors and a 1366x768 monitor all hooked up. I used to have 28c on the top card with just one 1080 and the 1366. I'm probably going to hack up a DVI cable to allow me to remote switch off the second 1080P to keep the temps cooler while gaming.

So, really I am just wanting some OC headroom on these cards and I just think it would look amazing to have these cards in a crazy loop.


As you can see in the picture, there is plate covering almost everything, except for that row of caps, and, not really sure what the other is.



I realize that someone may comment that my temps are higher because of the thermal paste still on the card and not replacing it. I replaced it with AS5. biggrin.gif (and was able to keep the warrant sticker intact, wooo hoooo razor blades!)


Would that be enough with some good airflow over it to compensate for the lack of a huge heatsink above it? Granted, the heatsink doesn't actually touch any of this. It basically just hovers above it, and it is a blower style fan, so the air does hit it, but obviously not much considering how think the fan blades are and how small it is. I doubt the static pressure of these fans are anything fantastic.

I'm just stumped as what to do to get good airflow over the heatsinks, and to be able to keep a clean look. One of my first thoughts was to ziptie to 120MM fans over them to push air over them, because the front of the case will have a 360MM rad in push-pull exhaust.

For TL:DR Is it safe to run my GFX cards in SLI with the plate that comes on the card, or should I take that off and get some good heatsinks to put on every individual vram, vrm, etc on the card? (with good airflow over them, of course)
post #2 of 3
It didn't say in there what type of waterblock you intend to get. Alot of people building custom loops will have full cover blocks with cover VRM and Vram as well. It'll be more expensive to go that route but you will have the cooling capacity for it. Universal blocks are good, but you will probably want say a 70-90mm fan blowing straight down on the card around the block to cool the VRM and Vram. You could also glue little heatsinks down to the PCB plate that you see since there's some flat surfaces for ones to be glued down but its totally upto you. Vram for a GTX670 gets hot IMHO, so I'd imagine Vram with a 770 which I've heard can reach like 8Ghz if you got a good card, would be pretty toasty.

I'd either go 1. Most expensive, full block, covers all. or 2. Universal block, 70mm, 80mm or 90mm fan blowing right now on the PCB plate with maybe some added heatsinks glued down...
Philaphlous
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7-6700k Asus Z170i ITX Pro Gaming Asus STRIX GTX 970 Team Group DDR4 3600 16GB Xtreem 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Sandisk X400 512GB m.2 SSD Silverstone NT06-Pro Windows 10 64bit 23" Acer 1920x1080 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse Pad
Rapoo E9070 Silverstone ST45SF-G Silverstone ML07b Xtrack XXL 
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Philaphlous
(12 items)
 
  
CPUMotherboardGraphicsRAM
Intel i7-6700k Asus Z170i ITX Pro Gaming Asus STRIX GTX 970 Team Group DDR4 3600 16GB Xtreem 
Hard DriveCoolingOSMonitor
Sandisk X400 512GB m.2 SSD Silverstone NT06-Pro Windows 10 64bit 23" Acer 1920x1080 
KeyboardPowerCaseMouse Pad
Rapoo E9070 Silverstone ST45SF-G Silverstone ML07b Xtrack XXL 
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post #3 of 3
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakewalk_S View Post

It didn't say in there what type of waterblock you intend to get. Alot of people building custom loops will have full cover blocks with cover VRM and Vram as well. It'll be more expensive to go that route but you will have the cooling capacity for it. Universal blocks are good, but you will probably want say a 70-90mm fan blowing straight down on the card around the block to cool the VRM and Vram. You could also glue little heatsinks down to the PCB plate that you see since there's some flat surfaces for ones to be glued down but its totally upto you. Vram for a GTX670 gets hot IMHO, so I'd imagine Vram with a 770 which I've heard can reach like 8Ghz if you got a good card, would be pretty toasty.

I'd either go 1. Most expensive, full block, covers all. or 2. Universal block, 70mm, 80mm or 90mm fan blowing right now on the PCB plate with maybe some added heatsinks glued down...

The only place I have found they would do a full block for mine is in Germany and I would have to ship my card out for 4-6weeks.. No thanks. I was looking at the XSPC raystorm gpu block. I'd be open to other suggestions though.

Also, are you suggesting heatsinks attached the the black plate or remove that and attach them directly to the Vram, etc?


Edit: because I just woke up and I suck at typing on this horrid laptop
Edited by jameyscott - 8/27/13 at 7:57am
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