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NH-U12S vs NH-U12P SE2 - Page 2

post #11 of 17
I only tested it on a i7 2600k @1,4V, where i can rech 4,7GHz, I dont push the voltage any further, but at that clock the U14s performed ~2C better. (on a benchtable btw)...
And from my experience the 212 doesnt blow any high end cooler away at any clock wink.gif Maybe they perform similar...
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post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

The single point contact in middle of heatsink pressing down onto CPU assures even distribution of pressure between cooler and CPU is an added bonus of Thermalright mount.

It's no bonus if it then leaves the cooler free to rotate several degrees post-installation. This is why the Hyper212+/Evo bracket is such garbage (apart from being flimsy), the heatsink should never have leeway to move and disturb the TIM after it's set. It looks like if you didn't tighten the pressure bolt on the Thermalright mount, then maybe the bridge would lock the heatsink nice and straight, but then there goes your pressure distribution. The spring-loaded Noctua system also assures very even distribution of pressure with absolutely zero potential for twisting off axis.
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

As for the Prolimatech being loose until you mount the cooler. Do you leave systems setting around rattling the coolers on them?? I always seem to mount the cooler almost immediately after the mount is on motherboard... biggrin.gif

It's just the marker of sloppy design/testing practices. It's clear that the bracket was never supposed to be loose during installation from the way they padded the studs (which don't end up making contact with the PCB). They didn't make it scalable enough to adapt to different motherboard/socket depths, and it gives a bad impression when I'm installing the product. Which product am I going to buy the next time; the one with the superficial fault, or the one with no fault at all?

To be fair, I do have one gripe with the Noctua mounting assembly, and that's the way the backplate's rubber pad adheres to the back of the motherboard over time. It causes no harm, but it can sometimes be a pig to peel off the PCB.
Edited by Oubadah - 8/31/13 at 6:33pm
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post #13 of 17
212 blowing away high performance coolers at low load? rolleyes.gif What Elohim said. thumb.gif

Center pressure point mounting does have better weight distribution than side to side mounting.

Your opinion of a bracket needing to be tightly mounted on motherboard before cooler is mounted is just that... your opinion... and it's an opinion that has no bearing on the quality of mounts.

I find it interesting how your opinions of a couple of the best cooler companies on the market go against all the knowledge and experience used to design and build them.

But do continue armchair quarterbacking. biggrin.gif
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

Your opinion of a bracket needing to be tightly mounted on motherboard before cooler is mounted is just that... your opinion... and it's an opinion that has no bearing on the quality of mounts.

This coming from the guy who just wrote
Quote:
Center pressure point mounting does have better weight distribution than side to side mounting.

That would be an 'opinion' too, so I'm not sure exactly what point you're trying to make. If you have an aversion to 'opinions', then you're going to have a hard time on internet forums like this.

The fact is that the Noctua can tilt on both axes sufficiently to comply with any CPU surface that isn't severely malformed, whilst also ensuring that the heatsink will never twist (which appears to be possible with the Thermalright system).
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

I find it interesting how your opinions of a couple of the best cooler companies on the market go against all the knowledge and experience used to design and build them.

Yeah, like how for all those years my opinion that Crossfire was stuttery crap went against all the knowledge and experience used develop it, then what do you know, frame metering proves it and suddenly AMD releases a fix.
Edited by Oubadah - 9/1/13 at 4:18am
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post #15 of 17
Well, you have all the right to have an opinion and to buy whatever you feel is the best for you...
But objectively these so called flaws are no functional flaws if you know what you are dealing with. Sure, the Noctua might be more noob friendly, wich isnt a bad thing, but i find the TR Kit slightly easier to work with.



BUUUT, the Archon doesnt fit anyway... wink.gif
I'd get the U12S for sure, the Phanteks 12DX might be an alternative, the build quality is at least on par with the U12s and the mounting of the Phanteks is virtually identical to Noctuas.
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post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oubadah View Post

Quote:
Center pressure point mounting does have better weight distribution than side to side mounting.
That would be an 'opinion' too, so I'm not sure exactly what point you're trying to make. If you have an aversion to 'opinions', then you're going to have a hard time on internet forums like this.
No, that is a fact.
*Pressure in center of object distributes load equally in all directions.
*Side mounting exerts pressure at the sides.. and if both sides are not exactly the same pressure the pressure distribution on CPU is not equal. And there is no such thing as an exact measurement of length or weight.. There is always room for improvement in accuracy. biggrin.gif

Also, if you tested the spring tension of 100 spring you might get 10 pair that are the same... because each one is a little different... and that tension changes over time too. The longer the spring is compressed the lower it's pressure rating.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oubadah View Post

The fact is that the Noctua can tilt on both axes sufficiently to comply with any CPU surface that isn't severely malformed, whilst also ensuring that the heatsink will never twist (which appears to be possible with the Thermalright system).
No, the fact is that the spring tension differs depending on length of compression.. and if the lenght is differend than there is different pressure being exerted on each side of cooler base in contact with CPU
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oubadah View Post

Yeah, like how for all those years my opinion that Crossfire was stuttery crap went against all the knowledge and experience used develop it, then what do you know, frame metering proves it and suddenly AMD releases a fix.
Irrelevant to this discussion... and was still your opinion until proven.

I have explained why center pressure is what it is.. I also said Noctua / Phanteks, etc. are also good. They all perform great. That does not change the facts.

This conversation is done.
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elohim View Post

Sure, the Noctua might be more noob friendly

Nice try.
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyll View Post

No, that is a fact.
*Pressure in center of object distributes load equally in all directions.
*Side mounting exerts pressure at the sides.. and if both sides are not exactly the same pressure the pressure distribution on CPU is not equal. And there is no such thing as an exact measurement of length or weight.. There is always room for improvement in accuracy. biggrin.gif

Also, if you tested the spring tension of 100 spring you might get 10 pair that are the same... because each one is a little different... and that tension changes over time too. The longer the spring is compressed the lower it's pressure rating.

No, the fact is that the spring tension differs depending on length of compression.. and if the lenght is differend than there is different pressure being exerted on each side of cooler base in contact with CPU

Now you're just splitting hairs. I might as well argue that Thermalright's pressure point is probably never 100% dead centre, therefore the pressure distribution is never equal. Unless poorly manufactured (which has never been the case with Noctua), the differences you mention are going to be utterly negligible. As I've said, having the heatsink locked against rotation is far more valuable than whatever miniscule pressure distribution advantage Thermalright provides.
Edited by Oubadah - 9/1/13 at 3:31pm
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