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TURBO BOOST for 2500k not functioning - Page 2

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sazerac View Post

Bios flashing still confuses and scares me. I do not have a UPS and my house is f@cking old and not reliable.

Need to clear something up, I was reading VID in coretemp when I was watching my initial OC's voltages. Now using CPU-Z for voltage, CoreTemp for temps(not run in tandem). So leaving everything stock I had more room than I thought before. Got to about 4.2ghz but the voltage ended up at 1.4V after 10minutes under max load with small fft p95 with 94% ram used.
So I set the vCore to 1.25 and just went for 3.9, 10min test p95, then up to 4.2ghz. Everything was fine so I bumped the vCore to 1.275, and got up to 4.6ghz no problem with temps under 70C. Didn't p95 this for long, just about 15min. Kinda got nervous because the OC was so easy and 4.6ghz is getting up there. So I went back to 4.5ghz and did 1344 and 1792 p95 tests for 20min each, no errors. Then blend test with 94% RAM for 8hours 49min no errors. Temps under 70C.
Can I call this a stable clock at this point? I may run another p95 for 12 hours tonight.

Now I should lower the voltage on my 4.5ghz OC and see how low I can get it stable?

Q:
Still confused on how to set the offset to make the turbo work while OC'd??


STABLE-
4500mhz, 1.275V, MaxTemp: 63-67-68-67, 9hours p95 passed
4500mhz, 1.25V, 10min small fft passed
4600mhz, 1.275V, 15min stable, MaxTemps under 70C

UNSTABLE-
4500mhz, 1.225V, BSOD with p95

I feel based on the temps of the 4.6ghz clock and the fact that my voltage is still pretty low for 4.5-4.6 that I could get around 4.8+ stable under 80C but I don't know if I want to try.


Yeah if you got flaky power at your place, it would definitely be best to not flash your BIOS until you get a UPS. Regarding Speed Step/Turbo, etc... I've taken a few screen captures of my BIOS to show you the settings I have relating to the overclock and the power management. I know I got a different motherboard but it should generally along the same lines with your board. In short you just need to be sure that Speed Step and Turbo are Enabled. Set C1E and the C-States to Enabled. And be sure that the power plan in Windows is set to "Balanced". This is what I've done on my board and it jumps between 1.6 GHz and 4.4 GHz as the CPU load changes.







With your overclock, I would say you are extremely close to stable. Personally, I've always been told to test the CPU overclocking using small FFTs (8k-16k, for example) as it stresses the CPU the most. But you've got the right idea testing almost all your available RAM. 8+ hours is quite a long time with Prime95 and some people are OK with that. Some prefer 12, 18, or even 24 hours...personally I like to get a good 12-18 hours with small FFTs and that has never failed to root out any instability.

That said, I think you're shaping up with a pretty good overclock. If you're comfortable pushing your CPU further, go for it - high frequency doesn't kill a CPU. Excessive heat or excessive voltage will be what damages the CPU. Your temps are excellent and your voltage is still quite reasonable. thumb.gif

Also, I think it might be worth mentioning Intel's Tuning Plan as it might interest you. Your CPU qualifies for an overclocking warranty for $20. Basically, the way it works is you get one replacement 2500K if you damage the chip from overclocking it. I know some people buy into the tuning plan as a safety net since the cost of a new CPU is quite steep for some. Food for thought. smile.gif
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks again, progress this time.

Now I have the OC to 4500mhz and 1.275V(1.272 actual), and it keeps voltage steady under stress. In fact, it raises a little bit, from 1.272V to 1.28V under small fft 4 thread p95 test. It does not go up with single thread tests.
Q: Is this normal for manual voltages?

Will play around with the vdroop and turn it back on to see if the turbo works that way.


Is there a way to set "offset"? Still a little unclear on what/how this works and I see it in most guides.

I also only have one value for cpu ratio, and it is the non turbo value, because it was 3300 originally. Still not getting any turbo past my 4500mhz OC, even with 1 thread p95 enabled. I was getting turbo to work at stock clock speed when running 1 thread p95.
So I can't set the turbo cpu ratio to my knowledge.

Still need some tweaking but already pretty happy with what I have, I have my cpu 1.2ghz(36%) higher than stock, and my temps are barely higher(~2C) than stock.
Based on what I saw, the stock settings drop the voltage way down to like 0.9+ when idle, but jump too high for normal sometimes up to 1.4+.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Now I have the OC to 4500mhz and 1.275V(1.272 actual), and it keeps voltage steady under stress. In fact, it raises a little bit, from 1.272V to 1.28V under small fft 4 thread p95 test. It does not go up with single thread tests.
Q: Is this normal for manual voltages?

Yup this is normal. It sounds like you have LLC (Load Line Calibration) set high. If that's the case, it will indeed raise the voltage slightly when you are slamming the CPU with a heavy load.

Quote:
Is there a way to set "offset"? Still a little unclear on what/how this works and I see it in most guides.

I presume you're talking about the offset voltage on the CPU? If so, one of the screen shots of my BIOS above shows how to set the voltage. You've probably noticed that your CPU voltage goes up and down with the speed of the CPU. The way it works is each multiplier has it's own "VID" (Voltage Identifier)...basically, this is how much voltage the CPU thinks it needs. Let's say, for example, you are getting 1.250 V under load for a particular multiplier and you actually need 1.275V to be stable. This means that you adjust the offset voltage to +0.025 to make up the difference (i.e. 1.250 V + 0.025 = 1.275 V). Now with a +0.025 offset, 0.025 V will be added to the VID of every multiplier on the CPU. You'll likely notice this with the CPU idle (at 1.6 GHz)...let's say for example, the voltage at 1.6 GHz goes down to 1.000 V. With the new +0.025 offset, the idle voltage will now be 1.025 V.

Using the offset is really just a matter of feeling out how much voltage you need. If you're unstable and you need a bit more voltage, just push the offset a little higher. In my case, it turns out the VID was higher than what I needed. So I have a negative offset (i.e. I intentionally lower the CPU voltage for each multiplier). The reason using the offset voltage is good is because it will lower the voltage to your CPU when it clocks down at idle (i.e. lower multipliers have a lower VID). OTOH, there's usually a setting to put the voltage to "Manual" instead. This isn't preferred for day-to-day use since it will keep your CPU voltage fixed no matter the multiplier that is being used.

Quote:
I also only have one value for cpu ratio, and it is the non turbo value, because it was 3300 originally. Still not getting any turbo past my 4500mhz OC, even with 1 thread p95 enabled. I was getting turbo to work at stock clock speed when running 1 thread p95.
So I can't set the turbo cpu ratio to my knowledge.

OK this is normal. When overclocking the Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge chips, basically what you're doing is just telling the CPU to turbo even more than it normally would. So if you set the CPU ratio to 45x, for example, instead of the CPU stopping at, say, 3.7 GHz it'll just keep going up to 4.5 GHz. So the way your CPU is working is completely normal. Unfortunately, the way the items in the BIOS are labeled is a bit confusing.

Quote:
Still need some tweaking but already pretty happy with what I have, I have my cpu 1.2ghz(36%) higher than stock, and my temps are barely higher(~2C) than stock.
Based on what I saw, the stock settings drop the voltage way down to like 0.9+ when idle, but jump too high for normal sometimes up to 1.4+.

Very nice...it's a good overclock you got going! thumb.gif
Edited by francisw19 - 9/12/13 at 9:17am
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
I tried turning VDroop to auto, and noticed no change in voltages. My voltage is a constant 1.272 unless loaded 100% then it jumps to 1.280. I believe Vdroop is my LLC setting.
If I change VCore back to auto, I believe I will not be able to reach 4.5ghz+ because my voltages tested before were 1.35++
Quote:
there's usually a setting to put the voltage to "Manual" instead. This isn't preferred for day-to-day use since it will keep your CPU voltage fixed no matter the multiplier that is being used.

So this sounds like what I am doing? I thought that setting the voltage to manual was the preferred method of OC'ing to get the VCore as low as possible with the highest stable clock speed.
For your MOBO it sounds like you are able to set the VCore to Auto, then apply an offset to change the min/max VCore?

Edit: So it seems from some reading that MSI boards don't use an offset.
turn the VCore to auto to see what happens, and it looks ok i guess. It does spike up at 1.4 briefly under load, haven't really tested it though. Overall the VCore is lower more often.
Edited by Sazerac - 9/12/13 at 5:23pm
post #15 of 16
Quote:
So this sounds like what I am doing? I thought that setting the voltage to manual was the preferred method of OC'ing to get the VCore as low as possible with the highest stable clock speed.
For your MOBO it sounds like you are able to set the VCore to Auto, then apply an offset to change the min/max VCore?

Edit: So it seems from some reading that MSI boards don't use an offset.
turn the VCore to auto to see what happens, and it looks ok i guess. It does spike up at 1.4 briefly under load, haven't really tested it though. Overall the VCore is lower more often.

Yup Manual voltage is OK for working on your overclock. But as mentioned above, you want to use the Offset Mode day-to-day once you have your overclock finished. With that, you'll allow the vCore to lower as your CPU clocks down at idle. Lowering the voltage at idle is better for the CPU long-term - less voltage, less heat, etc... thumb.gif

Also I just took a peak at the manual...it wasn't totally clear on which settings were available for the "CPU Core Voltage". Do you just have "Auto" and "Manual" only?
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Only Manual or Auto. Bogus. I still haven't tested a long p95 with the vcore on auto @4.5ghz. But I haven't had any problems with temps or bsod. Nothing. So I guess this is about as good as it gets, other than setting up other OC profiles that are higher clock at a defined VCore for a specific task.

edit: ran p95 small fft for about 20min and it maxed out at 1.32V, temps 69C and lower. This sounds within spec for the cpu and should be ok if those temps and VCore stand up to further testing right?
Edited by Sazerac - 9/18/13 at 5:03pm
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